INDUSTRIAL WORKPLACE E-LEARNING

We combine the most engaging visuals, the most accurate information, and the latest technology to create the best industrial eLearning courses you can buy.

Don’t Waste Your Money on Bad Training

Don’t waste another dollar on bullet-filled PowerPoints or clipart slideshows – visuals matter! Sight accounts for 83% of our sensory input. That’s why we pack our courses with high-quality visuals that blend all types of multimedia to increase learning and retention. And… to keep learners from falling asleep!

  • 3D models and animation of real-life equipment
  • 2D motion graphics, illustrations, arrows, highlights
  • Text that reinforces key concepts and supports narration
  • Narration that is short, sweet, and to the point
Crane and Hoist Rigging

It’s All About Learning

We understand that learning is about retaining good information. That’s why we build our visuals around key concepts that support course learning objectives. To ensure those learning objectives are met, we incorporate progress reviews throughout each online industrial eLearning course and finish with a comprehensive knowledge assessment.

  • Clearly defined learning objectives
  • Multiple choice, matching, drag-and-drop, fill-in-the-blank, and true/false question types
  • Configurable passing scores
  • Reporting to help identify knowledge gaps

Complete Compatibility

Our industrial eLearning courses are compatible with all modern browsers and operating systems. Take training on your desktop computer, tablet, or phone.

Complete Compatibility

Don’t Settle for Outdated Technology

You need eLearning with ultimate flexibility. That’s why we’ve taken the most advanced eLearning creation tools and pushed them even further to create a completely unique training platform. This technology allows us to easily modify passing scores, configure buttons and playback funtionality, update themes and styles, and more.

  • Deliver via SCORM or AICC
  • Compatible with all modern browsers and devices, including phones
  • Configure based on your needs
Current Technology
Training that speaks to everyone

Training That Speaks to Everyone

Whether you’re a local company employing international workers, or an international company with offices around the globe, we can help. Convergence courses offer a consistent training message in multiple language formats, and can be translated for an even broader audience upon request. Learn more about our translation and localization services.

  • Professionally translated into most common global languages
  • Supports any type of written character, from alphabetic letters to logograms
  • Custom localization and translation services available

My EHS Academy Course Libraries

EHS Training

Health & Safety (EHS)

221 Courses – 61+ Hours: Our online safety training videos are based on industry best practices and international standards established by OSHA, the EPA, and other leading safety organizations.
cranes and hoists

Cranes and Rigging

11 Courses – 4.6 Hours: Our online crane safety training videos are based on standards established by OSHA and other leading safety organizations. These courses cover general requirements for crane safety in manufacturing and general industry.

driver safety training

Driver Safety Training

21 Courses – 3.3 Hours: Our online driver safety training videos are based on standards established by OSHA and other leading safety organizations. These courses cover general requirements for fleet and workplace driving safety.

electrical safety training

Electrical Safety Training

6 Courses – 2.4 Hours: Our online electrical safety training videos are based on standards established by OSHA and other leading safety organizations. These courses cover general requirements for electrical safety in manufacturing and general industry.

Environmental Compliance Training

Environmental Compliance Training

20 Courses – 7.7 Hours: Our environmental compliance training videos are based on standards established by the EPA and other environmental agencies. Courses cover general requirements for environmental compliance in manufacturing and general industry.

equipment safety training

Equipment Safety Training

23 Courses – 6.5 Hours: Our online equipment safety training videos are based on standards established by OSHA and other leading safety organizations. These courses cover general requirements for equipment safety in manufacturing and general industry.

Ergonomic Safety Training

Ergonomics – Workplace Injury Prevention Training

5 Courses – 1.5 Hours: Our online workplace injury prevention training videos are based on standards established by OSHA and other leading safety organizations. 

fire protection & prevention training

Fire Protection & Prevention Training

2 Courses – 1.8 Hours: Our online fire protection training videos are based on standards established by OSHA and other leading safety organizations. These courses cover general requirements for fire protection and prevention training in manufacturing and general industry.

health & illness training

Health and Illness Training

8 Courses – 1.9 Hours: Our online occupational health training videos are based on standards established by OSHA and other leading safety organizations. These courses cover general occupational health training requirements for manufacturing and general industry.

lockout and energy control

Lockout and Energy Control

4 Courses – 1.4 Hours: Our online hazardous energy control training videos are based on industry standards established by OSHA and other leading safety organizations. These courses cover general hazardous energy control training requirements for manufacturing and general industry.

fire protection & prevention training

Personal Protective Equipment

8 Courses – 3.6 Hours: Our online PPE training videos are based on standards established by OSHA and other leading safety organizations. These courses cover general personal protective equipment (PPE) training requirements for manufacturing and general industry.

safety management

Safety Management

17 Courses – 5.2 Hours: Our online safety leadership training videos provide fundamental safety management skills to safety supervisors working in manufacturing and general industry.

working at heights

Working at Heights

6 Courses – 3.0 Hours: Our online fall safety training videos are based on standards established by OSHA and other leading safety organizations. These courses cover general fall hazard training requirements for manufacturing and general industry.

OSHA Training

OSHA 10 Construction

Successful completion of My EHS Academy’s online OSHA 10 course means you can get your OSHA 10 Construction Card and be on the job faster and safer. OSHA recommends Outreach Training Program courses as part of an orientation program for construction professionals and a number of states require the OSHA 10 CONSTRUCTION CARD to work on construction job sites or government projects.

OSHA Training

OSHA 10 General Industry

The OSHA 10 Hour General Industry Course is an OSHA-Authorized online training course that provides relevant safety material to help workers stay safe on the job. While anyone can take this online OSHA 10 General Industry course, it is specifically designed for: General Workers, Warehousing and Manufacturing Employees, Foremen and Job Supervisors, and Inspectors involved in General Industry activities. Upon completion, you will receive a U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OSHA 10 CARD.

OSHA Training

OSHA 10 en Español — OSHA 10 Horas Construcción

Este curso de formación en línea enseña a reconocer, evitar la reducción y prevención de los riesgos para la seguridad y salud en los lugares de trabajo. Este programa también proporciona información sobre los derechos de los trabajadores, las responsabilidades del empleador y cómo presentar una queja.

OSHA Training

OSHA 30 Construction

My EHS Academy’s OSHA 30 HOUR CONSTRUCTION COURSE features the required steps for completing OSHA Outreach training. Our OSHA 30 online training is a proven way to receive a valid OSHA 30 Hour Card and achieve the safety level required for work in the construction industry. This online course will benefit all workers and management at a construction office or work site. It’s intended for supervisors or workers with some safety responsibility. Upon completion of the course, professionals will receive a U.S. Department of Labor OSHA 30 Card.

My EHS Academy – All Courses

Complete list of training courses available on My EHS Academy.  Use the search feature to find the topic you are looking for.

Title Description Learning Objectives Hours Level Language
Rigging: Basic Lifting This course is designed to familiarize participants with the proper use of devices designed to lift and move loads. After completing this course, participants should be able to describe how to use a simple block and tackle, a compound block and tackle, a hoist, a jack, a winch, a turnbuckle, and a load leveler. They should also be able to describe the effects of sling angles and hitch patterns on a slings lifting ability. Identify the parts of a simple block and tackle.
Describe the proper use of a simple block and tackle.
Identify the parts of a typical compound block and tackle.
Describe inspections that are typically performed before a compound block and tackle is used.
Explain what is involved in reeving a block and tackle.
Describe the proper use of a compound block and tackle.
Define the term "mechanical advantage."
Explain how to use a formula to select the appropriate block and tackle needed to lift a given weight.
Describe the basic operation of a chain hoist.
Describe the basic operation of a come-along.
Describe the basic operation of a ratchet jack.
Describe the basic operation of a screw jack.
Describe the basic operation of a hydraulic jack.
Describe basic safety precautions associated with using a jack.
Describe the basic operation of a winch.
Describe the effects of sling angles on a sling's lifting capacity.
Describe the effects of hitch patterns on a sling's lifting capacity.
Describe how a turnbuckle can be used to adjust sling length.
Describe how a load leveler can be used to balance a load.
2 Intermediate English
Suspensión de cargas: Levantamiento básico (Rigging: Basic Survey) Este curso se creó a fin de que los participantes conozcan el uso correcto de los dispositivos diseñados para levantar y trasladar cargas. Al finalizar el curso, los participantes deberán ser capaces de explicar cómo se utiliza un sistema de poleas simple y un sistema de poleas compuesto, un polipasto, un gato, un cabrestante, un tensor y un nivelador de carga. También deben ser capaces de describir la incidencia de los ángulos y los patrones de enganche de las eslingas en su capacidad de elevación. Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
• Identificar las partes de un sistema de poleas simple.
• Explicar el uso correcto de un sistema de poleas simple.
• Identificar las partes de un sistema de poleas compuesto típico.
• Describir las inspecciones que normalmente se realizan antes de usar un sistema de poleas compuesto.
• Explicar qué implica el enhebrado de un sistema de poleas.
• Explicar el uso correcto de un sistema de poleas complejo.
• Definir el término “ventaja mecánica”.
• Explicar el modo de usar una fórmula para elegir el sistema de poleas adecuado que se necesita para levantar un peso determinado.
• Describir el funcionamiento básico de un polipasto de cadena.
• Describir el funcionamiento básico de un aparejo de palanca.
• Describir el funcionamiento básico de un gato de trinquete.
• Describir el funcionamiento básico de un gato de tornillo.
• Describir el funcionamiento básico de un gato hidráulico.
• Describir las precauciones básicas de seguridad relacionadas con el uso del gato.
• Describir el funcionamiento básico de un cabrestante.
• Describir la incidencia de los ángulos de la eslinga en su capacidad de elevación.
• Describir la incidencia de los patrones de enganche en la capacidad de elevación de la eslinga.
• Explicar cómo se puede usar un tensor para ajustar la longitud de la eslinga.
• Explicar cómo se puede usar un nivelador de carga para equilibrarla.
2 Intermediate Spanish
Rigging: Ladders and Scaffolds This course is designed to familiarize participants with various types of ladders and scaffolds that enable personnel to work at elevated heights. After completing this course, participants should be able to describe how to select the proper ladder for a job and then use the ladder safely. They should also be able to describe general safety precautions associated with using scaffolds and the basic operation and use of various types of fixed scaffolds and powered scaffolds. Describe various types of ladders and their ratings.
Explain how to select the proper ladder for the job.
Explain how to use a ladder safely.
Describe general safety precautions associated with stationary, or fixed scaffolds.
Describe the assembly, use, and disassembly of a systems scaffold.
Describe the assembly, use, and disassembly of a tubular welded frame scaffold.
Describe the basic components and operation of a pneumatic scaffold.
Describe the basic components and operation of a hydraulic scaffold.
2 Intermediate English
Suspensión de cargas: Escaleras y andamios (Rigging: Ladders and Scaffolds) Este curso se creó para que los participantes conozcan los distintos tipos de escaleras y andamios que le permiten al personal trabajar en alturas elevadas. Al finalizar el curso, los participantes deberán ser capaces de explicar cómo elegir la escalera adecuada para un trabajo y, luego, usarla de forma segura. Además, deben ser capaces de describir las precauciones generales de seguridad relacionadas con el uso de andamios y el funcionamiento básico y el uso de varios tipos de andamios fijos y motorizados.. Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
• Describir los diversos tipos de escaleras y sus calificaciones.
• Explicar la forma de elegir la escalera adecuada para un trabajo.
• Explicar cómo usar una escalera de manera segura.
• Describir las precauciones generales de seguridad relacionadas con los andamios fijos o inmóviles.
• Explicar el montaje, uso y desmontaje de un sistema de andamios.
• Explicar el montaje, uso y desmontaje de un andamio de armazón tubular soldado.
• Describir los componentes y el funcionamiento básicos de un andamio neumático.
• Describir los componentes y el funcionamiento básicos de un andamio hidráulico.
2 Fundamental Spanish
Safety: Basics This course is designed to familiarize participants with hazards that they may encounter on the job and ways that they can protect themselves from these hazards. After completing this course, participants should be able to describe causes of on-the-job accidents, explain how company safety policies can help prevent accidents, describe actions that can be taken to make a work site safe, and explain how workers can protect themselves from electrical hazards and fire hazards. Describe causes of on-the-job accidents.
Explain how good housekeeping can prevent accidents.
Explain why it is important to follow all company safety policies.
Explain why it is important to report on-the-job injuries, accidents, and near misses.
Explain why it is important for workers to know and follow company evacuation procedures.
Describe typical personal protective equipment, and explain when and why each type of equipment is used.
Describe how to inspect and care for personal protective equipment.
Describe safe procedures for lifting heavy objects.
Describe common workplace hazards.
Describe rules and guidelines for general work site safety.
Describe safety requirements for working in confined spaces.
Describe safe practices for operating or working near motorized vehicles.
Describe safe lockout/tagout procedures.
Describe safe practices for working around barriers and barricades.
State the purpose of the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard and the function of Material Safety Data Sheets.
Describe rules and guidelines for working safely around hazardous substances.
Describe how to inspect and work safely with ladders.
Describe how to inspect and work safely with scaffolds.
Describe typical work site electrical hazards.
Describe safe practices for working around electrical hazards.
Describe actions that should be taken when an electrical shock occurs.
Explain how fires start.
Describe common fire prevention practices.
Identify the classes of fires and the type of extinguisher to use for each class.
Describe actions that should be taken if a fire occurs.
2 Intermediate English
Seguridad: Conceptos básicos (Safety: Basics) Este curso se creó a fin de que los participantes conozcan los riegos que pueden presentarse en el trabajo y las formas mediante las cuales pueden protegerse de ellos. Al finalizar el curso, los participantes deberán ser capaces de explicar las causas de los accidentes en el trabajo y cómo las políticas de seguridad de la empresa pueden ayudar a prevenirlos, describir las medidas que se pueden tomar para crear un lugar de trabajo seguro y explicar cómo los trabajadores pueden protegerse de los riesgos eléctricos y de incendios. Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
• Describir las causas de los accidentes en el lugar de trabajo.
• Explicar de qué manera una buena limpieza puede prevenir accidentes.
• Explicar por qué es importante respetar todas las políticas de seguridad de la empresa.
• Explicar por qué es importante informar todas las lesiones, accidentes y posibles riesgos en el lugar de trabajo.
• Explicar por qué es importante que los trabajadores conozcan y sigan los procedimientos de evacuación de la empresa.
• Describir los equipos de protección personal típicos y explicar cuándo y por qué se utiliza cada tipo.
• Explicar cómo inspeccionar y cuidar los equipos de protección personal.
• Describir los procedimientos seguros para levantar objetos pesados.
• Describir los riesgos comunes del lugar de trabajo.
• Describir las normas y pautas para la seguridad general del lugar de trabajo.
• Describir los requisitos de seguridad para trabajar en espacios reducidos.
• Describir las prácticas de seguridad para operar vehículos motorizados o trabajar cerca de ellos.
• Describir los procedimientos seguros de bloqueo/etiquetado.
• Describir las prácticas de seguridad para trabajar cerca de barreras y barricadas.
• Indicar el propósito de la Norma de comunicación de peligro (Hazard Communication Standard, HCS) y la función de las hojas de datos de seguridad del material.
• Describir las normas y pautas para trabajar de forma segura cerca de sustancias peligrosas.
• Indicar cómo inspeccionar las escaleras y trabajar de forma segura con ellas.
• Indicar cómo inspeccionar los andamios y trabajar de forma segura con ellos.
• Describir los peligros eléctricos comunes del lugar de trabajo.
• Describir las prácticas de seguridad para trabajar cerca de peligros eléctricos.
• Indicar las medidas que se deben tomar en caso de que ocurra una descarga eléctrica.
• Explicar cómo se originan los incendios.
• Describir las prácticas comunes para prevenir incendios.
• Identificar las clases de incendios y los tipos de extintores que se usan para cada clase.
• Indicar las medidas que se deben tomar en caso de que ocurra un incendio.
2 Fundamental Spanish
Material Handling: Tank Trucks This course is designed to familiarize participants with basic concepts of material handling using tank trucks. After completing this course, participants should be able to describe characteristics of liquids that can affect liquid handling operations, and they should be able to describe precautions, procedures, and equipment associated with handling hazardous liquids. They should also be able to describe features of a typical tank truck and typical procedures for loading and unloading a tank truck. Explain how toxicity, viscosity, volatility, temperature, and pressure can affect liquid handling operations.
Describe how static electricity can affect the handling of bulk liquids.
Describe how operators can identify hazardous materials.
Identify precautions, procedures, and equipment associated with handling hazardous chemicals.
Describe the major features of a typical tank truck.
Identify associated equipment used with tanks during liquid transfers.
Identify equipment commonly associated with tank trucks.
Identify methods of transferring bulk liquids.
Describe the basic tasks involved in transferring bulk liquids.
Identify items that should be checked during pre-transfer and post-transfer inspections.
Describe typical procedures for top-loading a tank truck.
Describe how bottom-loading a tank truck differs from top-loading a tank truck.
Describe typical procedures for pressurized top unloading from a tank truck by pressurizing with air.
Describe common safety concerns and regulations associated with tank trucks.
2 Intermediate English
Patógenos de transmisión hemática (Bloodborne Pathogens) Los patógenos de transmisión hemática son microorganismos infecciosos que causan enfermedades y que viven en la sangre humana. El virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH), que es el virus que causa el sida, y el virus más común que causa la hepatitis B (VHB) son los dos patógenos de transmisión hemática más conocidos. Este curso analiza de qué forma los empleadores pueden ayudar a proteger a los operarios contra los agentes patógenos de transmisión hemática mediante una norma que regula esta problemática y la reducción al mínimo del riesgo de exposición.
 
Este curso incluye los siguientes temas:
• Tema 1: La sangre como material peligroso
• Tema 2: Los riesgos de la exposición ocupacional
• Tema 3: Reducción de riesgos
• Tema 4: Norma de la OSHA para patógenos de transmisión hemática
Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
• Explicar qué son los patógenos de transmisión hemática.
• Describir los efectos generales de la exposición al virus VIH.
• Describir los efectos generales de la exposición al virus HBV.
• Enumerar algunas categorías de trabajo que posiblemente corren riesgos de exposición a patógenos de
transmisión hemática.
• Describir algunos de los factores que determinan el nivel de riesgo para la exposición ocupacional
a patógenos de transmisión hemática.
• Explicar la regla principal presente en las precauciones estándar.
• Describir las vías de exposición a los patógenos de transmisión hemática en el lugar de trabajo.
• Describir algunas de las medidas de protección para reducir los riesgos de la exposición ocupacional.
• Describir los requisitos generales de la norma de la OSHA sobre los patógenos de transmisión hemática.
• Describir los requisitos generales del plan escrito de control de la exposición.
1.25 Fundamental Spanish
Back Safety (BBBSA00CEN) Back pain is one of most common health problems facing the work force today. It is estimated that back injuries cost industry over $80 billion every year, and the cost is growing. Eighty percent of the population will suffer back pain at some time in their lives. However, you can protect your back if you understand the causes of back pain and know how to avoid them. This course will help your understanding of how to keep your back healthy. Topic I: Posture
• Explain what is meant by the term good posture.
• Describe techniques that can be used to help maintain good posture.
 
Topic II: Safe Lifting
• Describe proper techniques for lifting and moving an object.
• Describe proper techniques for carrying a long load, stacking a load, and performing activities that involve twisting or turning.
 
Topic III: Exercises
• Describe basic exercises that can be done in an office.
• Describe basic exercises that can be done at home or in a gym.
1 Intermediate English
Seguridad para la espalda (Back Safety) El dolor de espalda es uno de los problemas de salud más comunes que enfrenta la fuerza de trabajo en la actualidad. Se estima que las lesiones de espalda le cuestan al sector más de $80,000 millones cada año y que el costo es cada vez mayor. El ochenta por ciento de la población sufre dolores de espalda en algún momento de su vida. Sin embargo, usted puede proteger su espalda si conoce las causas de los dolores y sabe cómo evitarlas. Este curso lo ayudará a saber cómo mantener su espalda saludable.
 
Este curso incluye los siguientes temas:
• Tema 1: Postura
• Tema 2: Cómo levantar objetos de manera segura
• Tema 3: Ejercicios
Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
• Explicar qué significa el término buena postura.
• Describir las técnicas que se pueden utilizar para ayudar a mantener una buena postura.
• Describir las técnicas correctas para levantar y mover objetos.
• Describir las técnicas correctas para trasladar una carga de gran longitud, apilar una carga y realizar actividades que involucren dar vuelta o girar.
• Describir ejercicios básicos que se pueden hacer en la oficina.
• Describir ejercicios básicos que se pueden hacer en el hogar o el gimnasio.
1.25 Fundamental Spanish
Clases de incendios y extintores (Classes of Fires and Extinguishers) Un incendio puede ocurrir prácticamente en cualquier momento y en cualquier lugar. Con el fin de actuar de forma segura ante un caso de emergencia, el personal debe ser capaz de identificar el tipo de incendio y seleccionar el tipo correcto de extintor para apagar el fuego. Este curso lo ayudará a reforzar su conocimiento sobre cómo identificar las diferentes clases de incendios y los distintos tipos de extintores. Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
Tema 1: Conceptos básicos sobre los incendios 
• Describir los tres elementos de la combustión.
• Describir las cinco clases de incendios.
 
Tema 2: Extintores y agentes extintores
• Describir los tipos comunes de extintores y agentes extintores de incendios.
 
Tema 3: Identificación de los extintores
• Describir las distintas formas de identificar los diferentes tipos de extintores de incendios.
1.25 Fundamental Spanish
Ingreso a espacios reducidos (Confined Space Entry) Parte de su trabajo puede implicar ingresar y trabajar en espacios reducidos. Si debe trabajar en espacios reducidos, su vida puede depender de estar debidamente informado sobre los riesgos del lugar y estar preparado de forma adecuada para protegerse ellos. Este curso lo ayudará a reforzar su conocimiento sobre los riesgos relacionados con los espacios confinados y lo que puede hacer para protegerse de ellos. Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
Tema 1: Características de los espacios reducidos 
• Describir las características de un espacio reducido.
• Nombrar algunos ejemplos de espacios reducidos.
• Explicar de qué forma se diferencia un espacio reducido para el que se exige un permiso de un espacio reducido que no requiere un permiso.
 
Tema 2: Riesgos de los espacios reducidos
• Describir los tipos principales de riesgos que se encuentran en los espacios reducidos que requieren permiso.
 
Tema 3: Norma de la OSHA sobre los espacios reducidos
• Describir los requisitos generales de la norma de la OSHA sobre los espacios reducidos que requieren permiso.
• Describir los requisitos generales para el programa de los espacios que requieren permiso por escrito.
 
Tema 4: Medidas de protección en espacios reducidos
• Describir los requisitos generales de un permiso de entrada típico.
• Describir algunas de las medidas de protección que se utilizan para proteger a los operarios que trabajan en espacios reducidos.
 
Tema 5: El empleado en espacios reducidos
• Describir las responsabilidades generales de un empleado en espacios reducidos.
1.25 Fundamental Spanish
Seguridad a la hora de conducir (Driving Safety) Como profesional, se espera que tenga un desempeño bueno en lo que hace. En cuanto a la conducción, esto significa esforzarse para conducir de manera segura y sin causar accidentes. Este curso está pensado para ayudarlo a evitar las consecuencias devastadoras que puede tener un accidente automovilístico. Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
Tema 1: Comprensión de los accidentes automovilísticos 
• Explicar los factores que, generalmente, están relacionados con los accidentes automovilísticos.
• Explicar la diferencia entre no estar en falta y no causar accidentes.
 
Tema 2: Manejo preventivo
• Explicar los términos manejo preventivo y administración del espacio.
• Analizar las técnicas específicas del manejo preventivo y la administración del espacio.
 
Tema 3: Estado del conductor
• Explicar los estados de ánimo que pueden causar accidentes: frustración y enojo, prisa, distracción y estado de somnolencia.
• Analizar la importancia que tiene el alcohol en los accidentes automovilísticos.
 
Tema 4: Características de seguridad y estado del vehículo
• Analizar la importancia que tiene el estado del automóvil.
• Explicar los cinturones de seguridad, las bolsas de aire y los sistemas de frenos antibloqueo.
1.25 Fundamental Spanish
Protección contra caídas (Fall Protection) En este curso, le demostraremos en qué momento es necesaria la protección contra caídas y los medios básicos para lograr este tipo de protección. Además, analizaremos los tipos básicos de equipos que se pueden utilizar para proporcionar protección contra caídas y aprenderemos cómo seleccionar, usar y cuidar adecuadamente un sistema personal de protección contra caídas. Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
Tema 1: Introducción
• Describir las condiciones de trabajo en las que es necesario usar protección contra caídas y los objetivos de esta norma.
• Identificar los medios básicos para lograr la protección contra caídas.
• Identificar los temas principales que se deben incluir para proporcionarle al personal la capacitación adecuada sobre la protección contra caídas.
• Explicar la diferencia entre la prevención de caídas y la detención de caídas.
 
Tema 2: Equipo de protección contra caídas
• Identificar y describir los componentes básicos de un sistema típico de detención de caídas.
 
Tema 3: Selección, uso y cuidado
• Describir la selección, el uso y el cuidado correctos de un sistema de detención de caídas.
1.25 Fundamental Spanish
Fire Safety (BBFSA00CEN) Employees have more control than they may realize over preventing fires in the workplace. For this reason, it is important for employees to know some basic safety methods for preventing fires and some basic techniques for managing a fire in case one breaks out. This course will reinforce your understanding of how to prevent and manage fires in the workplace. Topic I: How Fires Start
• Explain how fires start.
 
Topic II: Preventing Fires
• Describe two general categories of fire prevention methods and list examples of each.
 
Topic III: Managing Fire Situations
• Describe some common workplace evacuation procedures.
• Explain how to select and use common types of fire extinguishing equipment.
1 Intermediate English
Seguridad contra incendios (Fire Safety) Los empleados tienen más control de lo que creen sobre la prevención de incendios en el lugar de trabajo. Por este motivo, resulta importante conocer algunos métodos básicos de seguridad para prevenirlos y algunas técnicas básicas para controlarlos en caso de que se produzcan. Este curso reforzará su conocimiento sobre cómo prevenir y controlar los incendios en el lugar de trabajo.
 
Este curso incluye los siguientes temas:
• Tema 1: Cómo se originan los incendios.
• Tema 2: Prevención de incendios
• Tema 3: Manejo de las situaciones de incendio
Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
• Explicar cómo se originan los incendios. 
• Describir dos categorías generales de los métodos de prevención de incendios y enumerar ejemplos de cada una. 
• Describir algunos procedimientos comunes de evacuación del lugar de trabajo.
• Explicar cómo seleccionar y utilizar las clases comunes de equipos de extinción de incendios.
1.25 Fundamental Spanish
Globally Harmonized System Overview (BBGHS00CEN) The Globally Harmonized System for the Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS) was developed by the United Nations in an effort to better align regulations and standards governing the handling and transport of hazardous materials across different countries. This course covers the key elements brought about by the GHS and discusses how those elements have been incorporated into U.S. regulations, including OSHA's Hazard Communication Standard. Topic I: GHS History and Application
• Discuss the background of the GHS.
• Explain the need for the GHS.
• Describe the benefits of the GHS.
• Discuss the application and adoption of the GHS.
 
Topic II: Hazard Classification
• Define the GHS process of hazard classification.
• Describe the elements covered by GHS classification.
• Identify physical, health, and environmental hazards covered by the GHS.
 
Topic III: Labels
• Discuss the GHS label elements.
• Describe how GHS elements are incorporated into OSHA's Hazard Communication Standard.
• Identify specific considerations in the application and placement of labels.
 
Topic IV: Safety Data Sheets
• Discuss the purpose of the safety data sheet (SDS).
• Identify and explain the 16 elements of the SDS.
1 Intermediate English
Comunicación de riesgos (Hazard Communication) Por ley, usted tiene derecho a saber cómo protegerse de los riesgos que puedan existir en su lugar de trabajo. La información sobre estos riesgos se proporciona mediante etiquetas de advertencia, documentos y capacitación. Este curso reforzará su conocimiento sobre cómo obtener información sobre los riesgos del lugar de trabajo. Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
Tema 1: Programa escrito de comunicación de riesgos (HAZCOM) 
• Describir el objetivo y el contenido básicos de un programa escrito de comunicación de riesgos.
• Identificar los medios que suelen usar los operarios para obtener esta información y la capacitación que se describe en un programa escrito de comunicación de riesgos.
 
Tema 2: Tipos de riesgos
• Definir el término riesgo físico e identificar ejemplos de los tipos de riesgos físicos.
• Definir el término riesgo para la salud e identificar ejemplos de los tipos de riesgos para la salud.
• Definir los términos efectos graves para la salud y los efectos crónicos para la salud e identificar ejemplos de cada uno de ellos.
 
Tema 3: Etiquetas de advertencia
• Describir los requisitos de etiquetado de las sustancias peligrosas en el lugar de trabajo.
• Describir un diamante de materiales peligrosos de la NFPA®.
• Describir una etiqueta del sistema de identificación de materiales peligrosos (HMIS).
 
Tema 4: Hojas de datos de seguridad
• Describir la información que generalmente aparece en las hojas de datos de seguridad.
1.25 Fundamental Spanish
Preservación auditiva (Hearing Conservation) Si su trabajo exige la exposición a altos niveles de ruido, es fundamental que tome medidas para protegerse los oídos. La exposición poco frecuente a ruidos fuertes puede no ser peligrosa, pero la exposición prolongada puede causar la pérdida irreversible de la audición. Este curso analiza cómo el ruido puede dañar su capacidad auditiva y las medidas que puede tomar para minimizar sus consecuencias.
 
Este curso incluye los siguientes temas:
• Tema 1: Niveles de ruido peligrosos
• Tema 2: Programa de preservación auditiva
• Tema 3: Equipos de protección auditiva
Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
• Definir los siguientes términos: sonido, onda sonora y ruido.
• Describir dos características de las ondas sonoras: intensidad y frecuencia.
• Describir en qué consiste un programa de preservación auditiva eficaz.
• Describir cómo los tapones para oídos y las orejeras brindan protección para los oídos.
1.25 Fundamental Spanish
Job Safety Analysis A Job Safety Analysis is a hazard identification tool used to help reduce incidents, accidents, and injuries in the workplace. This course will instruct workers on how to develop, implement, review, and modify a Job Safety Analysis. By the end of this course you will be able to:

 

• Define Job Safety Analysis
• Explain why a Job Safety Analysis should be conducted
• Describe the process for conducting a Job Safety Analysis
• Identify potentially hazardous jobs in your workplace
• Identify the key steps in a job
• Use a team approach to brainstorm potential hazards associated with each job step
• Ask Leading Questions that help identify hazards
• Describe how to eliminate or control hazards within a Job Safety Analysis
• Periodically review your Job Safety Analysis in order to identify improvement opportunities
• Modify the Job Safety Analysis 

 

1 Intermediate English
Laboratory Safety (BBLASA0CEN) This course looks at the hazards that are found within the laboratory and some ways to protect lab workers from those hazards. Also included is an overview of the OSHA Lab Standard, the elements of a Chemical Hygiene Plan, and some of the basic rules of good chemical hygiene. Chemical storage requirements and some general procedures to follow in case of an emergency are also covered. Topic I: Hazards in the Laboratory
• Describe two broad categories of chemical hazards
• Explain the difference between acute and chronic health effects from chemical exposure
• Describe the four routes of chemical exposure
 
Topic II: Minimizing the Risks
• Describe four basic principles of safety in the laboratory
• Describe three main types of personal protective equipment used in the laboratory
 
Topic III: The OSHA Lab Standard
• State the primary requirement of the OSHA Lab Standard and describe some methods of meeting that requirement
• Describe the general requirements of the written Chemical Hygiene Plan and explain some ways those requirements can be met
 
Topic IV: Chemical Hygiene Practices
• Describe some basic chemical hygiene practices that will help minimize exposure to hazardous chemicals in the lab
 
Topic V: Chemical Storage
• Describe some general guidelines for chemical storage
• List five classes of chemicals that should be considered for storage purposes
 
Topic VI: Emergency
• Explain some general procedures to follow in the event of an emergency in the lab
1 Intermediate English
Bloqueo/etiquetado (Lockout/Tagout) La energía peligrosa descontrolada es una posible causa de accidentes de trabajo. Este curso analiza la energía peligrosa y el aislamiento de los equipos con procedimientos de bloqueo/etiquetado como una forma de controlarla. Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
Tema 1: Energía peligrosa 
• Enumerar los tipos de fuentes de energía.
• Definir el término “energía peligrosa”.
• Comparar la energía activa y la energía residual.
• Analizar el objetivo y el alcance de las normas de bloqueo/etiquetado de la OSHA.
 
Tema 2: Programas de control de energía
• Explicar qué es un programa de control de energía.
• Comparar los procedimientos de bloqueo y etiquetado.
• Describir las características de los dispositivos de bloqueo y etiquetado.
• Describir la capacitación de los empleados y los controles necesarios para el programa de control de energía.
 
Tema 3: Puesta en práctica
• Indicar los pasos básicos para poner en práctica los controles de energía.
• Describir los pasos básicos para quitar los dispositivos de bloqueo/etiquetado de los equipos.
• Analizar las situaciones especiales que pueden tener lugar durante el bloqueo/etiquetado.
1.25 Fundamental Spanish
Developing an Office Safety Mindset Every worker has the right to a safe workplace, and every employer has the responsibility to provide a safe environment. This course, which is divided into two topics, identifies and describes several workplace safety issues that need to be addressed to ensure a safe and healthful working environment. Specifically, topic one, Safety Orientation, discusses establishing safe work habits and ensuring proper lighting, air quality, and venting for optimum workplace safety. Topic two, Safety in the Workplace, discusses proper processes and procedures for a number of workplace safety issues. Describe and establish safe work habits 1 Intermediate English
Equipo de protección personal (Personal Protective Equipment) Distintos tipos de vestimenta de protección protegen a los trabajadores de muchos riesgos relacionados con el trabajo. Este equipo de protección resguarda la cabeza, las manos y los pies de los operarios. En algunas situaciones, un operario puede necesitar un equipo que cuente con protección respiratoria y protección contra caídas. Este curso lo ayudará a desarrollar y reforzar su conocimiento sobre los tipos de vestimenta y equipos que pueden protegerlo de los riesgos relacionados con el trabajo. Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
Tema 1: Vestimenta de protección 
• Describir la vestimenta básica que se puede utilizar para protegerse de los riesgos relacionados con el trabajo.
• Describir los tipos de guantes que se utilizan para proteger las manos de los riesgos relacionados con el trabajo.
• Describir los tipos de calzado que se utilizan para proteger los pies de los riesgos relacionados con el trabajo.
 
Tema 2: Equipo de protección
• Describir el casco de seguridad típico y otra protección para la cabeza a fin de evitar los riesgos relacionados con el trabajo.
• Especificar los tipos y usos de los equipos de protección más frecuentes necesarios para proteger los ojos y los oídos.
 
Tema 3: Protección respiratoria
• Describir los equipos que se utilizan para brindar protección respiratoria.
 
Tema 4: Protección contra caídas
• Describir el equipo habitual que se utiliza como protección contra caídas.
1.25 Fundamental Spanish
Protección respiratoria (Respiratory Protection) Si no hay suficiente oxígeno en el aire que se inhala, el cuerpo no puede seguir funcionando. Si el aire contiene partículas que son lo suficientemente pequeñas para entrar en los pulmones, se podrían dañar los tejidos de los pulmones y otras partes del cuerpo. Si el aire que se inhala contiene gases tóxicos, estos gases pueden reaccionar con los líquidos del cuerpo y tener consecuencias perjudiciales para la sangre, los pulmones y otros órganos vitales. En este curso, analizaremos los respiradores con purificadores de aire, los respiradores con suministro de aire, y el uso y cuidado de estos equipos. Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
Tema 1: Purificadores de aire 
• Explicar qué es un purificador de aire e identificar los tipos comunes.
• Describir los equipos desechables típicos de respiración con filtrado en la máscara y explicar cómo se utilizan.
• Describir el típico respirador con cartucho o filtro químico y explicar cómo se lo puede utilizar.
• Explicar cómo elegir el cartucho adecuado para un respirador con cartucho químico.
• Describir la típica máscara de gas y explicar cómo se la puede utilizar.
 
Tema 2: Respiradores de suministro de aire
• Identificar los tipos básicos de respiradores de suministro de aire.
• Describir el típico respirador de línea de aire y explicar cómo se lo puede utilizar.
• Describir el típico equipo de respiración autónomo (SCBA) y explicar cómo se lo puede utilizar.
• Describir el típico respirador portátil de escape y explicar cómo se lo puede utilizar.
 
Tema 3: Uso y cuidado de los respiradores
• Identificar los factores que inciden en la elección del respirador.
• Describir las reglas generales para el control y el uso seguro de los respiradores.
• Describir las reglas generales para la limpieza y el almacenamiento de los respiradores.
1.25 Fundamental Spanish
Respirator Fit Testing (BBRFT00CEN) This unit will look at various factors that can affect how well a respirator fits. The unit will also address how to put on a disposable respirator and ensure that it fits properly. Fit checks and tests that can be performed to ensure that a respirator will provide adequate protection will also be presented. Topic I: Fitting
• Explain how proper respirator fit is determined.
• Identify factors that may prevent a respirator from properly fitting an individual.
 
Topic II: Disposable Respirators
• Describe how to ensure a proper fit with a disposable filter mask respirator.
 
Topic III: Fit Checks
• Describe basic procedures for performing exhalation and inhalation fit checks.
 
Topic IV: Testing
• Describe basic procedures for performing qualitative testing.
• Describe basic procedures for performing quantitative testing.
1 Intermediate English
Prueba de ajuste correcto del equipo de respiración (Respirator Fit Testing) Esta unidad analizará los diversos factores que pueden afectar el buen ajuste de un respirador. La unidad también abordará cómo colocarse un respirador desechable y asegurarse de que quede bien ajustado. También se examinarán los controles y las pruebas de ajuste que se pueden realizar para garantizar que un respirador brinde la protección adecuada. Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
Tema 1: Ajuste 
• Explicar de qué forma se determina el ajuste adecuado del respirador.
• Identificar los factores que pueden evitar que un respirador se ajuste correctamente a una persona.
 
Tema 2: Equipos de respiración descartables
• Describir el modo de garantizar un ajuste correcto con un equipo de respiración descartable con filtro en la máscara.
 
Tema 3: Verificaciones de ajuste
• Describir los procedimientos básicos para realizar verificaciones de ajuste de exhalación e inhalación.
 
Tema 4: Pruebas
• Describir los procedimientos básicos para realizar pruebas cualitativas.
• Describir los procedimientos básicos para realizar pruebas cuantitativas.
1.25 Fundamental Spanish
Orientación a la seguridad (Safety Orientation) Dado que cada profesión tiene riesgos potenciales, es importante estar al tanto de los problemas de seguridad. Este curso abarca los siguientes problemas de seguridad comunes asociados con el lugar de trabajo: los hábitos de trabajo seguros, los equipos de protección personal, la comunicación de riesgos y la seguridad contra incendios. Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
Tema 1: Hábitos de trabajo seguros 
• Enumerar las condiciones que pueden afectar la aptitud del operario para el trabajo.
• Identificar las buenas prácticas de limpieza que fomentan la seguridad en el lugar de trabajo.
• Describir los problemas de seguridad relacionados con el uso apropiado de las herramientas y escaleras.
• Explicar cómo levantar objetos pesados de manera segura.
• Indicar los métodos para aislar las fuentes de energía.
• Describir los pasos para actuar en caso de descargas eléctricas.
 
Tema 2: Equipo de protección personal
• Enumerar los tipos de equipos de protección personal que se usan normalmente para proteger a los operarios en el trabajo.
• Nombrar los tipos de equipos de protección personal que se pueden necesitar para riesgos especiales.
• Identificar los tipos de protección contra caídas.
 
Tema 3: Comunicación de riesgos
• Describir los tipos de datos que generalmente aparecen en las hojas de datos de seguridad.
• Comparar los colores y los números que se usan en un diamante de materiales peligrosos.
• Describir las etiquetas y las señales que se pueden usar para proporcionar información sobre los riesgos del lugar de trabajo.
 
Tema 4: Seguridad contra incendios
• Describir los pasos básicos para actuar en caso de un incendio.
• Comparar los usos de las diferentes clases de extintores de incendios.
1.25 Fundamental Spanish
Safety Data Sheets (BBSDS00CEN) A safety data sheet (SDS) contains important information about working safely with hazardous chemical products and preventing exposure to them. This course covers the different sections of an SDS to help you become familiar with its format and understand its contents. Topic I: Introduction to Safety Data Sheets
• Describe the purpose of an SDS.
• Compare SDSs with material safety data sheets (MSDSs).
• List benefits of an SDS.
 
Topic II: Sections 1 Through 8
• Name the headings of sections 1 through 8 of an SDS.
• List some of the information found in sections 1 through 8 of an SDS.
 
Topic III: Sections 9 Through 16
• Name the headings of sections 9 through 16 of an SDS.
• List some of the information found in sections 9 through 16 of an SDS.
1 Intermediate English
Hojas de datos de seguridad (Safety Data Sheets) Una hoja de datos de seguridad (SDS) contiene información importante sobre cómo trabajar de forma segura con productos químicos peligrosos y cómo evitar exponerse a ellos. Este curso abarca las diferentes secciones de una SDS para ayudarlo a familiarizarse con el formato y comprender su contenido. Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
Tema 1: Introducción a las hojas de datos de seguridad 
• Describir el propósito de una SDS.
• Comparar las SDS con las hojas de datos de seguridad del material (MSDS).
• Enumerar los beneficios de una SDS.
 
Tema 2: Secciones 1 a 8
• Mencionar los encabezados de la SDS de las secciones 1 a 8.
• Enumerar algunos de los datos que aparecen en la SDS en las secciones 1 a 8.
 
Tema 3: Secciones 9 a 16
• Mencionar los encabezados de la SDS de las secciones 9 a 16.
• Enumerar algunos de los datos que aparecen en la SDS en las secciones 9 a 16.
1.25 Fundamental Spanish
Operación segura de montacargas (Safe Forklift Operation) En este curso se analizarán algunas de las técnicas que generalmente se utilizan para manejar un montacargas, incluidas algunas situaciones especiales que es probable que ocurran. Además, se examinan varios problemas de seguridad del tránsito relacionados con la operación de montacargas. Finalmente, analizaremos cómo manipular cargas con seguridad usando un montacargas. Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
Tema 1: Cómo maniobrar un montacargas 
• Describir cómo maniobrar un montacargas.
 
Tema 2: Seguridad de tránsito
• Explicar cómo manejar un montacargas para que usted, los demás y las propiedades estén protegidos de daños.
 
Tema 3: Cómo manipular cargas
• Describir las pautas generales relacionadas con la manipulación segura de cargas con un montacargas.
1.25 Fundamental Spanish
Understanding Forklifts (BBUFL00CEN) Forklifts are used for a wide variety of material handling tasks. They use hydraulic and mechanical power to lift and move loads easily. But because of this power, improper operation of a forklift can have devastating consequences. Therefore, it is important that if you are responsible for operating a forklift, you have the appropriate skills, knowledge and training to do your job safely. Topic I: Forklift Basics
• Describe the various types of forklifts.
• Describe the differences between a forklift and a car.
 
Topic II: Forklift Components
• Describe the basic components of a forklift.
• Describe a forklift’s operating controls and gauges.
 
Topic III: Principles of Stability
• Describe the factors that affect the stability of a forklift.
1 Intermediate English
Workplace Ergonomics (BBWOPE0CEN) One of the leading causes of injury in the workplace is physical stress associated with repetitive motion and working in awkward positions. Making the workplace more user-friendly in an effort to prevent or minimize these types of injuries is the focus of a field of study called ergonomics. This course is a tool that you can use to reinforce your understanding of what ergonomics is and how it can help reduce workplace injuries. Topic I: Ergonomics Basics
• Describe musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs).
• Explain the term ergonomics.
 
Topic II: Ergonomic Risk Factors
• Describe ergonomic risk factors associated with MSDs.
• Describe work activities that involve ergonomic risk factors.
 
Topic III: Common MSDs
• Describe common MSDs.
• Explain the importance of reporting signs and symptoms early.
 
Topic IV: Controlling Ergonomic Hazards
• Explain what a job hazard analysis is.
• Describe some things you can do to reduce MSD hazards.
1 Intermediate English
Ergonomía en el lugar de trabajo (Workplace Ergonomics) Una de las principales causas de lesiones en el lugar de trabajo es el estrés físico relacionado con los movimientos repetitivos y el trabajo en posiciones incómodas. Lograr que el lugar de trabajo sea más fácil de usar a fin de evitar o minimizar este tipo de lesiones es el enfoque de un campo de estudio que se llama ergonomía. Este curso es una herramienta que se puede utilizar para reforzar su conocimiento sobre la función de la ergonomía y la forma en que puede ayudar a reducir las lesiones en el lugar de trabajo. Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
Tema 1: Aspectos básicos de la ergonomía 
• Explicar los trastornos musculoesqueléticos (MSD).
• Explicar el término ergonomía.
 
Tema 2: Factores de riesgo ergonómicos
• Describir los factores de riesgo ergonómicos relacionados con los MSD.
• Describir las actividades laborales que involucran factores de riesgo ergonómicos.
 
Tema 3: Trastornos musculoesqueléticos comunes
• Describir los MSD comunes.
• Explicar la importancia de informar los signos y síntomas de manera temprana.
 
Tema 4: Control de los riesgos ergonómicos
• Explicar qué es un análisis de riesgos laborales.
• Describir algunas medidas que se pueden tomar para reducir el riesgo de desarrollar un MSD.
1.25 Fundamental Spanish
Warning Signs and Labels (BBWSAL0CEN) This course discusses warning signs and labels, including the types of signs and tags, hazardous product labels, and shipping labels. Topic I: Signs and Tags
• Describe types of information that can be found on signs and tags.
 
Topic II: Hazardous Product Labels
• Describe types of information that can be found on hazardous product labels.
 
Topic III: Shipping Labels
• Describe types of information that can be found on shipping labels.
1 Intermediate English
Etiquetas y señales de advertencia (Warning Signs and Labels) En este curso, se analizan las señales y las etiquetas de advertencia, incluidos los tipos de señales y etiquetas, las etiquetas de productos peligrosos y las etiquetas de envío. Después de completar este curso, podrá cumplir los siguientes objetivos:
Tema 1: Señales y etiquetas 
• Describir el tipo de información que se incluye en las señales y etiquetas.
 
Tema 2: Etiquetas de productos peligrosos
• Describir el tipo de información que se incluye en las etiquetas de productos peligrosos.
 
Tema 3: Etiquetas de envío
• Describir el tipo de información que se incluye en las etiquetas de envío.
1.25 Fundamental Spanish
HAZWOPER 8 Hour Refresher with ID Card This convenient HAZWOPER Refresher course is updated annually to reflect any changes in regulations and meets the requirements of OSHA CFR 1910.120 for 8 hours of annual refresher training.  This course serves as continuing education training for workers who have taken the prerequisite 24 or 40 hour HAZWOPER course.  To ensure that our customers are getting the most up to date training, this course is updated every year and as any changes to the regulation occur.
 
WHO SHOULD TAKE THIS COURSE?
This course is designed for workers who remove hazardous waste, or are exposed or potentially exposed to any kind of hazardous substance or health hazard in the course of their work.  Keep in mind that any worker exposed to hazardous or potentially hazardous substances must, at a minimum, take this refresher course annually to ensure adequate training.  More information on when a HAZWOPER refresher course should be taken can be read on OSHA's site here.
 
After completing this course, you will have immediate access to a personalized certificate of completion that can be printed from your computer.  A wallet ID card is also included with your purchase and will be mailed out upon course completion.
TOPICS COVERED INCLUDE:
• Environmental Law Updates
• Hazard Recognition
• Hazard Assessment
• Engineering Controls
• Air Monitoring
• Toxicology/Chemical Characteristics
• Chemical Decontamination
• Case Studies
• Site Characterization
 
Need to purchase the HAZWOPER 8 hour refresher for a team? No problem! Call our Education Advisors today at 1-866-546-1212 to get set up.
8 Fundamental English
Emission Controls One of the critical concerns of industries that deal with hazardous chemicals is the release or discharge of these substances into the air. This course identifies different types of emissions and their effects on the environment and describes methods that can be used to prevent or control emissions. AIR POLLUTION
Define the terms emissions and air pollution.
Describe various forms of emissions and their sources.
Describe ways that emission levels can be monitored. EMISSION PREVENTION AND CONTROLS
Describe how emissions can be reduced at the source.
Describe how vapor recovery and condensation can prevent emissions from reaching the environment. SCRUBBERS
Describe the basic operation of a wet scrubber.
Describe the operation of a gas scrubber system.
Describe operator responsibilities associated with gas scrubber systems. CARBON ADSORPTION
Describe the operation of a fixed-bed carbon adsorption system.
Describe the operation of a regenerable fixed-bed system. PARTICULATE CONTROL
Describe the operation of a cyclone.
Describe the operation of a baghouse.
Describe operator responsibilities associated with baghouses.
Describe the operation of an electrostatic precipitator. INCINERATION
Describe the basic operation of an incinerator.
Identify process variables that must be monitored and controlled in order for an incinerator to operate safely and efficiently.
1 Intermediate English
OSHA Standards on Steel Erection According to OSHA, 56,000 steel erectors continue to suffer 35 fatal accidents per year, a rate of one death per 1,600 workers. OSHA estimates that 30 of those deaths, as well as nearly 1,150 annual lost-workday injuries, will be averted by compliance with provisions of the 2002 steel erection standard which is the basis for this course.

This 2-hour interactive online course covers requirements to protect employees from the hazards associated with steel erection activities involved in the construction, alteration, and/or repair of single and multi-story buildings, bridges, and other structures where steel erection occurs. The requirements of this subpart apply to employers engaged in steel erection unless otherwise specified. This subpart does not cover electrical transmission towers, communication and broadcast towers, or tanks.

At the conclusion of this course you will be able to:

• Categorize OSHA safety and health standards for steel erection construction by general topic
• Identify and comprehend general steel erection construction terms used in the description of OSHA  safety and health standards for steel erection construction
• Integrate OSHA safety and health standards for steel erection construction into your own standards for steel erection construction
• Be able to understand OSHA safety and health standards for falling object protection as well as fall protection.

2 Fundamental English
Back Safety: Protection and Treatment Basics Did you know that back injuries account for nearly 20% of all injuries and illnesses in the workplace and cost the nation an estimated 20 to 50 billion dollars per year?  OSHA reports that in 2004, a total of 401,000 nonfatal injuries and illnesses were incurred by workers in the construction industry. The back was the part of the body most frequently injured. Back injuries and other cumulative trauma disorders can be associated with such activities as manual material handling, hand tool usage, awkward postures and prolonged equipment operation. This 1-hour interactive online course helps you learn how to protect yourself and those around you from back pain, and how to properly treat back ailments should they arise. At the conclusion of this course, you will be able to: 
• Identify the most common causes of back pain
• Discuss the right ways to move to prevent back injury
• Describe the diagnosis and treatment of back pain
1 Fundamental English
OSHA Safety: Drilling The oil and gas industry employs hundreds of thousands of people and is a vital component of the national economy.  Worker safety and health are important to this industry and it is essential to be aware of potential hazards present in the workplace.  This 4-hour interactive online course discusses OSHA standards and directives that dictate OSHA safety procedures for oil and gas well drilling.  This course also identifies common hazards and possible solutions to reduce incidents that could lead to injuries or fatalities. At the conclusion of this course, you will be able to:
• Discuss the procedure for safely placing and assembling the various parts of equipment that make up the rig, and preparing the rig for drilling.
• Describe the process of actually drilling the well and the equipment and drilling fluids utilized for the task.
• Discuss the potential hazards and possible solutions of casing operation procedures.
• List the types of equipment that need regular maintenance and the procedures to ensure safety maintenance compliance.
• Define the two basic components of well control and how to prevent blowouts.
• Explain the general safety and health procedures related to the oil and gas well drilling industry including crane, derrick, and hoist safety, fire safety, PPE, and chemical safety, etc.
4 Fundamental English
OSHA Safety: Stairways and Ladders Ladders come in an array of shapes and sizes designed to fit specific needs. Some ladders are designed for specific projects and fixed on buildings while others can be taken from job site to job site. This 1-hour interactive online course discusses stepladders, portable ladders, fixed ladders, and all OSHA safety equipment requirements to keep you and your employees out of harms way.

Ladders are often times not sufficient at a job site and either stairways must be built or existing stairs utilized. When such circumstances arise there are similar OSHA requirements that must be followed to ensure that accidents don’t happen. At the completion of this course you will be familiar with these requirements and be capable of putting your knowledge to good use on the job.

At the conclusion of this course, you will be able to:
• Define all OSHA standards for ladders made on the job site and those manufactured
• Name OSHA specifications for temporary stairways
• Distinguish how to keep ladders and temporary stairways safe
• Understand the General Requirements when providing stairways and ladders
1 Fundamental English
Medical Waste Stream: Identification and Handling All institutions serving the public generate waste.  However, wastes from health care facilities have a unique component, medical wastes, which are of particular concern. Medical waste includes a wide variety of materials – from used bedding to bandages, from syringes to pathological wastes.  The nature of medical wastes and other waste streams generated by health care facilities will be discussed in this 1-hour interactive online course, and information will be provided as to which wastes are considered special wastes unique to medical facilities.  By knowing which wastes are potentially hazardous, the student will be able to develop more proficient means of handling, collection, transportation and disposal. At the conclusion of this course, you will be able to:

• Recognize the number of waste streams generated in hospitals and other medical facilities
• Identify wastes which require special handling from wastes that do not
• List a schedule of wastes to guide medical personnel in their proper handling and disposal
• Estimate the medical waste generation quantities from various health care facilities

1 Fundamental English
OSHA Safety: Introduction to Powered Industrial Trucks Approximately 100 fatalities and 36,340 serious injuries in general industry and construction occur annually due to powered industrial truck related accidents. With such staggering statistics, an employer is morally and legally obligated to take every safety precaution possible when dealing with powered industrial trucks. This 1-hour interactive online course focuses not only on the new OSHA standards for properly training employees to operate industrial trucks, but also the rules and regulations that must be followed to safely operate an array of work-oriented vehicles. At the completion of this course you will be able to: 

• Explain how to properly train your employees to use powered industrial trucks
• Discuss the circumstances where refresher training is required and when to conduct performance evaluations
• Identify how to keep a truck stable
• Recognize the different classes of powered industrial trucks

1 Fundamental English
OSHA Recordkeeping: General Recording Criteria When an injury or illness occurs in the workplace, are you aware of the OSHA standards for recording such an event? This 2-hour interactive online course is designed to teach you when and how to record such things as days away from work, restricted work or transfer to another job, medical treatment beyond first aid, loss of consciousness, or a workplace death. You will learn not only the general requirements that apply to such events, but also how and when to return an employee to the workplace. At the completion of this course you will be able to:

• Recognize what should be recorded as a work related injury or illness
• Discuss how to report days away from work due to a work related injury or illness
• Describe how to report restricted work due to a work related injury or illness
• Explain the difference between medical treatment and first aid
• Discuss how to report loss of consciousness
• Identify what is considered a significant injury

2 Fundamental English
OSHA Standards: Bloodborne Pathogens The OSHA BBP Standard is a published set of regulations designed to protect you against the health hazards of exposure to bloodborne pathogens — exposures that may cause diseases that may be transmitted by blood or other body fluids. The OSHA BBP Standard requires that controls and compliance methods be put in place by employers and followed by employees in order to eliminate or minimize the scope of the exposure. These controls and compliance methods must be included by law in your employer’s BBP Exposure Control Plan. In addition, OSHA requires training for any employee whose job duties may potentially involve contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials on the job. 

This training is divided into 3 topics:
• In Topic 1, we will discuss the OSHA BBP Standard and your employer’s Exposure Control Plan, which outlines the protective measures your employer will take to eliminate or to minimize your exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials.

• In Topic 2, will discuss the OSHA BBP Standard in terms of specific pathogens, including Hepatitis B virus, Hepatitis C virus, and HIV.

• In Topic 3, we will discuss the benefits of the Hepatitis B vaccination and the OSHA requirements of what to do if you are exposed to bloodborne pathogens in the workplace. 

Employees covered under OSHA’s bloodborne pathogens standard include health care workers in medical, dental, and laboratory settings who have the potential for occupational exposure, including housekeeping and maintenance personnel.

At the conclusion of this course, you will be able to:
• Explain the engineering controls, work practice controls, and personal protective equipment used to reduce exposure to blood and other potentially infectious material
• Describe the OSHA BBP Standard, the characteristics of BBPs, including HBV, HIV, and HCV and how the immune system responds
• Describe the benefits of the Hepatitis B vaccine
• Describe the OSHA requirements regarding the exposure incident, evaluation, and follow-up and the OSHA requirements regarding specific workplace practices
1 Intermediate English
Safe Work Permits This course summarizes the various components of the Safe Work Permit process that should be used within a facility or organization for work being performed by construction and maintenance contractors and employees. The Safe Work Permit process is based around a written form and is a communication tool used to inform employees of safety requirements. Maintenance and construction type activities can then be coordinated with appropriate personnel within the facility to help avoid safety concerns and potential conflicts. The Safe Work Permit can be critical for the success of a site safety program and can be applied to a variety of facilities, including manufacturing facilities, construction sites, etc. At the end of this course, you will be able to:
• List the benefits for using a Safe Work Permit Process
• Identify the purpose of safe work permitting
• List the responsibilities of the various project team members with respect to safe work permitting
• State the factors that may affect how Safe Work Permits are covered by project leaders
• List the reasons for on-site inspections
• Name three additional permits that can be involved along with the Safe Work Permit
1 Intermediate English
Worksite Safety 01: OSHA Safety Introduction The Occupational Safety and Health Administration was founded in 1971 to address the rights and responsibilities of employees and employers in the national workplace in a cohesive manner. The mission of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is to send every worker home whole and healthy every day. Since the agency was established in 1971, workplace fatalities have been cut by 62 percent and occupational injury and illness rates have declined 40 percent. This Introductory course covers a bit of the history and functions of OSHA and how it serves to benefit workers in ways that were unprecedented before its existence.
 
OSHA recommends Outreach Training Program courses as an orientation to occupational safety and health for workers.  Workers must receive additional training, when required by OSHA standards, on the specific hazards of their job.
 
Please note: This course is not a part of the OSHA 10 Hour Construction Program. 
Upon completion of this module, students should be able to: 

• Define the acronym “OSHA” and explain what OSHA does.
• Name the publication that contains the OSHA standards and the four broad categories of business/industry covered by these standards.
• List at least three employer responsibilities required by the OSHA standards.
• Summarize a worker’s rights and list at least three worker responsibilities covered under the OSHA standard.
• Know how to find out more about OSHA and where to seek OSHA’s help.

1 Fundamental English
Worksite Safety 02: OSHA Electrical Safety OSHA’s electrical standards were put in place to help minimize deaths and injuries from dangers such as electrocution, burns, electric shock, fires, and explosions. This course examines the main causes of different types of hazards and details precautions for preventing accidents. It looks specifically at the requirements of 29 CFR 1926, Subpart K – which covers the design characteristics of safe systems for use when installing and using electrical systems. 
 
OSHA recommends Outreach Training Program courses as an orientation to occupational safety and health for workers.  Workers must receive additional training, when required by OSHA standards, on the specific hazards of their job.
 
Please note: This course is not a part of the OSHA 10 Hour Construction Program. 
Upon completion of this module, students should be able to: 

• Describe four types of injuries that can result from contact with electricity
• Name at least three warning signs that an electrical hazard may exist
• List at least five electrical hazards that may exist on a construction site
• Describe at least three methods for protection from electrical hazards

2 Fundamental English
Worksite Safety 04: OSHA Struck-By & Caught-Between Accidents “Struck-by” and “caught-between” accidents are major causes of injuries and fatalities on construction worksites. Struck-by incidents are classified as accidents where workers are hit by swinging booms, falling objects (such as bricks from a scaffold), or flying objects (such as particles flying off an object being drilled or ground by a power tool). Caught-between accidents are often fatal occurrences when a worker is unwittingly caught in the gears of machinery; pinned between a vehicle and a wall, or even caught by the clothing or hair on a moving part and pulled into danger. This interactive online course provides information to assist the learner in the identification, avoidance, and control of these hazards in the workplace. While workers may need additional training based on OSHA standards and the specific hazards of their jobs, RedVector’s Worksite Safety courses can help inject entry-level workers with critical knowledge on a variety of OSHA-regulated safety and health topics.

OSHA recommends Outreach Training Program courses as an orientation to occupational safety and health for workers. Workers must receive additional training, when required by OSHA standards, on the specific hazards of their job.
 
Please note: This course is not a part of the OSHA 10 Hour Construction Program. 

Lesson Objectives: Struck-By Accidents
 
Terminal Objective: Given current OSHA and industry information regarding construction worksite illnesses, injuries and/or fatalities, the student will be able to recognize Caught-in or -between hazards in construction.
 
Enabling Objectives:
• Identify common caught-in or -between hazards
• Describe types of caught-in or -between hazards
• Protect themselves from caught-in or -between hazards
• Recognize employer requirements to protect workers from caught-in or -between hazards
Lesson Objectives: Caught-In or -Between Hazards
 
Terminal Objective: Given current OSHA and industry information regarding construction worksite illnesses, injuries and/or fatalities, the student will be able to recognize Caught-in or -between hazards in construction.
 
Enabling Objectives:
• Identify common caught-in or -between hazards
• Describe types of caught-in or -between hazards
• Protect themselves from caught-in or -between hazards
• Recognize employer requirements to protect workers from caught-in or -between hazards
1.5 Fundamental English
Worksite Safety 05: OSHA Personal Protective Equipment Hazards in your workplace can be sharp edges, falling objects, flying sparks, chemicals, noise, or many other potentially dangerous situations. OSHA requires all employers to protect their employees from workplace hazards, and when they can’t control a hazard at its source, they need to provide workers with accoutrements such as hard hats, gloves, respirators, goggles, safety shoes, and other gear to minimize the likelihood of a mishap. This course covers many common forms of PPE and how to choose it, wear it and care for it.
 

OSHA recommends Outreach Training Program courses as an orientation to occupational safety and health for workers.  Workers must receive additional training, when required by OSHA standards, on the specific hazards of their job.

 
Please note: This course is not a part of the OSHA 10 Hour Construction Program. 

Upon completion of this module, students should be able to: 

• Describe the two primary means of protecting employees from workplace hazards, prior to considering personal protective equipment (PPE)
• List at least four of the seven items that should be covered during PPE training
• Identify at least three elements of an appropriate PPE program
• Match the PPE described in this lesson to at least one hazard for which it is appropriate protection

1 Fundamental English
Worksite Safety 06: OSHA Scaffolds An estimated 2.3 million construction workers, or 65 percent of the construction industry, work on scaffolds frequently. In 1996, when OSHA issued the revised Scaffold Standard for construction, the agency estimated that by protecting these millions of workers from scaffold falls, 4,500 injuries and 50 deaths from scaffold-related accidents would be prevented every year. This course will familiarize you with the facts you need to know to be in compliance with OSHA 1926.451, Subpart L, and keep yourself safe during scaffold work.
 

OSHA recommends Outreach Training Program courses as an orientation to occupational safety and health for workers.  Workers must receive additional training, when required by OSHA standards, on the specific hazards of their job.

 
Please note: This course is not a part of the OSHA 10 Hour Construction Program.

Upon completion of the lesson, participants will be able to: 

• Name the three types of scaffolds and describe their main characteristics
• List at least three of the four main hazards to which persons working on a scaffold are exposed, and describe at least one method of hazard prevention for each of the hazards.
• Identify the three essential elements of safe scaffold construction, and give at least three examples of incorporating each of the elements.

1 Fundamental English
Worksite Safety 07: OSHA Cranes & Other Hoists Moving large, heavy loads is critical to the manufacturing and construction industries, but unfortunately, cranes, derricks, hoists, and other lifting devices pose significant safety issues for both their operators and for workers in proximity to them. The rules are complex and often out of date; here, we give OSHA-Subpart N-recommended, ANSI-based tips for safe usage and cover cranes, derricks, hoists, elevators and conveyors.
 
OSHA recommends Outreach Training Program courses as an orientation to occupational safety and health for workers.  Workers must receive additional training, when required by OSHA standards, on the specific hazards of their job.
 
Please note: This course is not a part of the OSHA 10 Hour Construction Program. 
Upon completion of the lesson, participants will be able to: 

• List the four major causes of crane accidents
• Describe the preplanning that is required before putting a crane into use
• State the two main precautions that apply to working with cranes near power lines

1 Fundamental English
Worksite Safety 08: OSHA Power Tools and Excavations It might seem silly to think of non-powered hand tools as hazardous, but anyone who’s ever hit a finger with the full force of a hammer blow or staple-gunned their hand might beg to differ. Power tools are relatively safe when used properly and well maintained, but an electric shock resulting from a defective or modified device can be deadly. This course will teach you the basics for keeping yourself and your coworkers out of harms way when using tools.
 

OSHA recommends Outreach Training Program courses as an orientation to occupational safety and health for workers.  Workers must receive additional training, when required by OSHA standards, on the specific hazards of their job.

 
Please note: This course is not a part of the OSHA 10 Hour Construction Program. 

Upon completion of the lesson, participants will be able to:
• List at least three basic hand and power tool safety rules
• Identify at least two precautions that are essential to safe use of:
• Name at least two guarding techniques or principles that apply to hand and power tools
1 Fundamental English
Worksite Safety 09: OSHA Materials Storage The handling and storage of materials used in the construction trade involves diverse operations such as hoisting heavy steel bars with a crane, driving a truck loaded with concrete blocks, manually carrying bags, and stacking drums, lumber or loose bricks. When any of these things are done the wrong way, serious injuries and extensive costs can result. Avoid pitfalls by reading about OSHA’s rules in this course.
 

OSHA recommends Outreach Training Program courses as an orientation to occupational safety and health for workers.  Workers must receive additional training, when required by OSHA standards, on the specific hazards of their job.

 
Please note: This course is not a part of the OSHA 10 Hour Construction Program. 

Upon completion of the lesson, participants will be able to:  

• List the three main injuries that occur during material handling, storage, use and disposal
• Describe at least two ways to prevent injury when performing manual lifting
• Explain at least three ways to eliminate hazards that may lead to injury when using forklifts, cranes or slings to handle materials
• Describe at least three actions that can reduce or eliminate hazards when storing, using or disposing of materials

1 Fundamental English
Developing and Implementing an EPA RMP Any facilities that manufacture, use, store or otherwise handle certain extremely hazardous chemicals will be subjected to the EPA’s Chemical Accident Prevention regulations at 40 CFR part 68.To comply with this regulation, a facility must develop and submit an EPA Risk Management Plan, or RMP, and implement it in the facility. The primary goal of an EPA RMP is to protect communities from the release of toxic or flammable chemicals that are prone to cause immediate, serious harm to public and environmental health. Thus, it is important for the practitioners to have in-depth knowledge on how to develop an EPA Risk Management Plan so it can be applied in their respective facilities.
 
This course will provide the practitioners and participants with an overview of the EPA Risk Management Plan, the history of the RMP Rule, and requirements for compliance with the EPA's 112(r) Risk Management Program rule (40 CFR Part 68). The different program levels of an EPA RMP will be discussed, in addition to steps for developing a Risk Management Plan. The course will also address the differences between OSHA PSM and EPA RMP Program Regulations, different elements of a RMP Plan, and how to conduct a hazard assessment. Details on dispersion modeling and consequence modeling and the selection and application of these models will be covered in this course, as well as risk communication strategies and the requirements for an Emergency Response Program.
By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• List the different requirements for developing a Risk Management Plan following the EPA's 112(r) Risk Management Program rule (40 CFR Part 68)
• Discuss how to conduct a hazard assessment
• Describe how to perform an offsite consequence analysis
• List the different types of dispersion models and discuss how they are used for various situations
• Develop an Emergency Response Program
• Develop a Risk Communication Strategy
2 Fundamental English
Worksite Safety 10: OSHA Demolition Demolition is one of the most spectacular – and dangerous – undertakings in the construction industry. A tremendous number of safety precautions are taken and meticulous planning that goes into each such undertaking. This course will familiarize you with some of the basics of safe demolition practices and the attendant OSHA standard.
 

OSHA recommends Outreach Training Program courses as an orientation to occupational safety and health for workers.  Workers must receive additional training, when required by OSHA standards, on the specific hazards of their job.

 
Please note: This course is not a part of the OSHA 10 Hour Construction Program. 

Upon completion of the lesson, participants will: 

• Have a basic knowledge of the preparatory operations necessary before demolition takes place
• Know the basics of the different types of demolition (mechanical vs. explosives)
• Know the basics for demolishing special structures
• Be familiar with safe work practices
• Be familiar with safe blasting procedures
• Know the safety basics for transporting explosives

1 Fundamental English
Worksite Safety 11: OSHA Hazards in Communication There are already more than 650,000 hazardous chemical products in circulation around any number of workplaces in the U.S., and hundreds more are introduced every year. More than 30 million workers may be exposed to a chemical hazard or to multiple chemical hazards. If you haven't yet been poisoned, remember: There's still time! Make sure it doesn't happen to you by familiarizing yourself with the HCS – OSHA's Hazard Communication Standard, which is discussed in this course.

Also covered in this course is ear-drum-damaging occupational noise, and what OSHA requires employers and employees to do to monitor the levels and minimize exposure. We'll also look at precautions for dealing with one especially dangerous toxic substance that is widely found in the construction industry: Silica.
 
Please note: This course is not a part of the OSHA 10 Hour Construction Program. 

Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:

• Name the basic components of the Hazard Communications Standard
• Review the labeling of chemical containers
• Identify an MSDS and be able to read and understand it accurately
• Discuss health and environmental hazards as well as physical hazards
• Describe a Written Hazard Communication Program
• Explain the requirements of Employee Training

0.5 Fundamental English
Health Effects Caused by Mold In the past twenty years, great progress has been made to understand the effects that mold has on human health. This course will provide a basic but clear understanding of what types of mold are dangerous, to what groups of people, and the factors that increase the negative impact on humans. At the conclusion of this course, you will be able to:
• Identify the most common health symptoms of mold exposure.
• Categorize the 4 groups of people that are most at risk of the negative health consequences related to mold exposure.
• List the types of mold that are less noxious and more noxious to humans.
• Engage the debate about fungal health effects.
1 Fundamental English
Personal Protective Equipment For Mold Remediation Contractors and Consultants From head to toe, the correct personal protective equipment is no accident. It is a series of informed choices to protect hands, lungs, eyes, clothes, skin, and feet from the potential health effects of the work environment. This course is designed to inform remediation contractors and consultants of the requirements and numerous options available to help their team remain safe and healthy while in a hazardous work environment. At the conclusion of this course, you will be able to:
• Identify the basics of the OSHA regulations related to PPE
• Describe how to perform a respirator fit test
• Distinguish the necessary hand protection that also provides the dexterity you need /li>
• Break down the particulate filter rating system /li>
• Describe the selection criteria of disposable protective suits
1 Fundamental English
Mold Safety and Health Workplace safety and health for the remediation contractor is much more than just another policy. It’s about people and profit. This course will help you understand the unique concerns of this industry and how to turn hassle into habit. From hazard communication and project documentation to practical on-site safety tips, this course will prepare you to lead your team toward a practice of better and safer projects. At the conclusion of this course, you will be able to:
• Recognize the signs of heat related disorders and the initial steps to take in response
• Explain the difference between “General Industry” OSHA regulations and their regulations for “Construction”
• List the most common safety concerns on the project site
• Demonstrate recent changes to the hazard communication requirements for your company
1 Fundamental English
Mold Remediation Buildings inevitably get wet, both inside and out, and they must be allowed to dry or mold will grow in them. This course provides an overview of mold remediation. We will review guidelines on cleaning and remediation methods for clean water damage. We will also cover some possible situations and useful methods or techniques for remediation. By the end of this course, you will be able to:

• Describe the equipment used to assess mold
• Recall the types of materials that may have to be discarded when contaminated with mold or mold spores
• List questions to consider before starting remediation
• Name the suggested cleaning methods for various materials and furnishings
• Prioritize the steps to mold remediation in HVAC systems
• Identify the first step in remediating mold in a confined space
• Differentiate between limited and full containment
• List techniques for communicating with the building inhabitants

1 Fundamental English
Crane Safety Cranes are the workhorses that are utilized for economic growth and to complete major construction activities around the country- not only construction, but mining, logging, maritime operations, and maintenance of industrial facilities.There are hazards that come with the operation of cranes and can result in serious injuries and death. This webcast is designed to provide the basic information necessary for safe operation of cranes. By the end of this webcast you will be able to:
• Explore OSHA regulations for the safe use of cranes.
• Identify different types of cranes and hoists and the guidelines for their use.
• State the procedures for proper inspection and maintenance.
• Recall the guidelines for proper equipment testing.
• Prioritize the proper precautions for crane operators and co-workers. Identify the elements of a crane safety program.
2 Fundamental English
More Than Mold – Health Effects Associated With Mold and Water Damage Mold is probably one of the most common pollutants responsible for building-related illnesses. It’s certainly the one with the highest profile. This course is designed to teach you everything practical you might need to know about what is required for mold to grow, how mold spreads, and how mold might affect the health of occupants in a building and the workers that clean mold up.

This course will debunk some myths about toxic mold and tell you some things about mold you may not have heard before. It’s more than mold. As you will understand after taking this course, health symptoms associated with mold exposure are often due to a complex and poorly understood mixture of agents other than or in addition to mold.
 
This course goes into detail regarding the types of mold that grow indoors and the allergens, irritants and mycotoxins associated with mold growth. This course covers other things to be aware of when trying to develop an exposure assessment or remediation protocol regarding mold and the presence of water damage.
 
This course is helpful for anyone in the mold assessment or mold remediation business and for those suffering in sick buildings or buildings affected with mold or water damage that wants to better understand how damp conditions might be effecting their health.
 
This course is helpful for anyone in the mold assessment or mold remediation business and for those suffering in sick buildings or buildings affected with mold or water damage that wants to better understand how damp conditions might be effecting their health.

At the conclusion of this course, you will be able to:
• Identify requirements for mold to grow
• Describe how mold grows and spreads
• Recognize health effects associated with mold
• Identify agents other than mold that may be responsible for health effects associated with water damage
3 Fundamental English
Worksite Safety 03: OSHA Fall Protection Each year, on average, between 150 and 200 workers are killed and more than 100,000 injured because of falls at construction sites. OSHA’s construction industry safety standard for fall protection 29 CFR,Subpart M, outlines systems and procedures designed to prevent employees from falling off, onto, or through working levels and to protect employees from being struck by falling objects. Here, we outline the basics and provide some “do’s” and “don’ts” for novices and those who need a refresher course.

OSHA recommends Outreach Training Program courses as an orientation to occupational safety and health for workers.  Workers must receive additional training, when required by OSHA standards, on the specific hazards of their job.
 
Please note: This course is not a part of the OSHA 10 Hour Construction Program.

Lesson Objectives: Fall Protection
 
Terminal Objective: Given current OSHA and industry information regarding construction worksite illnesses, injuries and/or fatalities, the student will be able to recognize fall hazards in construction. Specifically, the student will be able to:
 
Enabling Objectives:
• Identify major fall hazards
• Describe types of fall hazards
• Protect him/herself from fall hazards
• Recognize employer requirements to protect workers from fall hazards
1 Fundamental English
Safety: Electrical Part 1 – Fundamentals, Materials & Equipment Grounding Welcome to this 2-hour interactive online course that is the first of a two-part series which introduces you to many workplace situations that require you to work safely with electricity. You’ll learn how and why electricity can be dangerous. You’ll also learn about various methods used for protection. Safety begins with the careful installation of electrical components by means of approved wiring methods. You should use safety procedures and practices that insulate you from electricity’s power anytime you work with or near electrical equipment or components. Specifically, Part 1 looks at:

• Fundamentals of electricity & associated hazards
• Using proper materials and components
• Equipment grounding

By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Explain how electricity can harm you and your property.
• Identify the two steps that ensure electrical safety for you and your coworkers
• Discuss the importance of properly using quality electrical components.
• Identify the basic methods of protection when wiring electrical installations.
• Recognize the importance of safely grounding electrical equipment and systems.
2 Intermediate English
Safety: Electrical Part 2 – Hazardous Location, Clearances & Safety Practice (RV-10744) This 2-hour online course is the second of a two-part series which introduces you to many workplace situations that require you to work safely with electricity. You’ll learn how and why electricity can be dangerous. You’ll also learn about various methods used for protection. Safety begins with the careful installation of electrical components by means of approved wiring methods. You should use safety procedures and practices that insulate you from electricity’s power anytime you work with or near electrical equipment or components. Specifically, Part 2 looks at:

• Hazardous locations
• Safe working clearances
• Safety practices
 
 

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

• Select the type of electrical equipment to use in a hazardous location
• List the safety practices required in an electrical work area
• Talk about the importance of a clear working space around electrical equipment
• Elevate your own level of safety training to be sure it matches the electrical work you’re performing

 

 

2 Intermediate English
Developing an Employee Safety Training Program People working in facilities, and in industry, need a solid foundation with respect to safety training, and leading people, and employees. So, this course will provide you with that solid foundation that will help you in developing a valid, and detailed, safety training program for your group. This program can then be applied to your organization’s specific safety program’s requirements for employee training. This course will provide you with information on Emergency Action Plans, Medical Emergency Plans, Lockout/Tagout requirements, Confined Space Entry Procedures, and other critical topics. At the end of this course, you will be able to:

• Discuss basic requirements for employee safety trainings
• Describe how to provide control of employees in the areas of lockout/tagout, cutting and welding, emergency action plan, and other site policies
• Review typical medical emergency plans and accident report forms
• Identify the PPE personal protective equipment that can be required for employee sites

1 Fundamental English
Environmental Safety Environmental safety is becoming more and more critical for industrial and commercial companies as they are required to comply with increasingly stringent regulations- from municipal, state, and federal governments. Some key areas of concern in this area of Environmental Safety are Air Quality, Surface and Ground Water, Toxic Substances, and Hazardous Wastes. Poor air quality has been linked to serious health conditions and damage to respiratory and cardiovascular systems. Surface and ground water quality applies to both drinking water and recreational waters. Contamination of water by infectious agents or chemicals can cause mild to severe illness. Protecting water sources and minimizing exposure to contaminated water sources are important parts of environmental safety. And then Toxic substances and hazardous wastes. The health effects of toxic substances and hazardous wastes may be more difficult to determine exactly. There’s actually research underway to better understand how these types of exposures can impact the environment and our health. In the meantime, there is a focus on reducing any exposures in this area. By the end of this course, you will be able to:

• Define air quality standards, ambient air quality, point sources, and fugitive sources.
• Explain an energy management program, primarily process heating, process cooling, and compressed air systems
• Discuss waste water and ambient water quality basics, as well as waste water management
• Describe water conservation techniques, water monitoring and water reuse
• Identify noise factors in environmental safety and how to reduce noise hazards

1 Intermediate English
Fire Alarm Essentials In this course we will improve your recognition and comprehension of fire alarm systems and components when you experience them in your work and on-site observations. We have included many photographs to help you visualize the explanations. At the end of this course, you will be able to:

• Differentiate between Class A and Class B fire alarm circuits
• Recognize the electrical solenoid and its contribution to fire alarm systems
• List types of fire alarm circuiting
• Identify some fire alarm symbols utilized on contract documents

2 Intermediate English
Hazardous Waste: Treatment Hazardous waste can exist in liquid, solid or slurry forms. It may originate in a current manufacturing process or from clean-up of an abandoned site. This course will review the background and design considerations for different methods of treating hazardous waste. By the end of this course, you will be able to:

• Analyze five major sectors of chemical treatment for industrial and municipal wastewater streams, sludge and solids, and learn how they are utilized.
• Differentiate between four major types of physical treatment processes and summarize how they are used..
• Discuss the important factors and concepts in biological treatment, along with processes and types of reactors used.
• Describe the steps involved in incineration, main factors controlling incineration effectiveness, and effluent standards for incineration.
• State the methods and mechanisms utilized in stabilization.
• Describe five emerging technologies used in hazardous waste treatment.

1 Intermediate English
Confined Spaces in Construction This course will define "confined spaces" and discuss hazards associated with confined space entry. You will learn about emergency procedures associated with confined space entries so you can understand the roles and responsibilities of all involved. This course will provide imagery of various entry points and will identify abnormal behavior and inconsistencies as well as show the proper techniques for monitoring confined spaces. By the end of this course you will be able to:
• Identify risks associated with vertical or horizontal confined space entry
• Differentiate between a permit required as well as a non-permit required confined space
• List the key responsibility of entrance attendants and entry supervisors
• Review non-entry rescue guidelines
• Evaluate the appropriate lower and upper explosive limit levels for each hazard as well as the permissible exposure limit for flammable liquids and chemicals
1 Fundamental English
2015 International Fire Code Essentials – General Safety Precautions How well versed are you in the safety requirements laid out by the 2015 International Fire Code Essentials? In this online interactive course we give you detailed instruction in code administration, general precautions against fire, and emergency planning and preparedness. Developed in partnership with the International Code Council. At the end of this course, you will be able to:

• Develop a more detailed understanding of the most commonly applied general safety requirements of the 2015 International Fire Code.
• Understand code administration and requirements of each of the International Codes.
• Define the legal aspects, permits and inspections of the IFC.
• Describe the general precautions against fire and emergency planning and preparedness.

2 Fundamental English
2015 International Fire Code Essentials – Site and Building Services Fires can cause significant injury or loss of life. It is important to have services in place so fire fighters can quickly gain access to a building in the event of an emergency. This interactive online course teachers you about the International Fire Code and how it regulates building services. You will learn about fire service features including roadways for fire department access, water supply manual firefighting operations and means of identifying buildings through its address or other markings. You will also learn about selection and installation requirements for decorative materials and furnishings that could become sources of fuel for fires.
 
Developed in partnership with the International Code Council. 
 
By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Identify approved fire apparatus road requirements for buildings
• Describe fire service features and the necessary inspection and maintenance of these systems
• Describe proper installation, operation, and maintenance of building systems
• Define the requirements for interior finishing and decorative materials
2 Fundamental English
2015 International Fire Code® Essentials – Fire/Life Safety Systems and Features Unwanted fires injure and kill thousands annually and inflict a monetary impact on communities. Did you know that over 40 percent of the businesses that experience a fire never reopen because they lose their customer base? That is why fire code enforcement is an important public safety function.
 
In this interactive online course, you will learn about provisions requiring a fire protection system in the 2015 International Fire Code® (IFC®) and the 2015 International Building Code® (IBC®), including required documents, testing, and procedures for impairment and monitoring. You will also learn requirements for automatic sprinkler systems, including key terms, design and installation standards, types, and other vital requirements. Finally, you will explore means of egress systems and various components, such as load, width, distance, illumination, and maintenance.
 
Developed in partnership with the International Code Council®. 
By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Explain, with added detail, the most commonly applied fire/life safety systems and features of the 2015 International Fire Code® (IFC®)
• Determine requirements for all fire protection systems
• Recall different types of automatic sprinkler systems and when they are required
• Describe means of egress and the different components
2 Fundamental English
2015 International Fire Code Essentials – Special Processes and Building Uses Proper handling of flammable and combustible materials can significantly reduce hazards to property and people. This interactive online course teachers you about the 2015 International Fire Code® (IFC®) and regulations on handling and storage of combustible material. You will learn about sources of ignition, storage, use and handling of flammable and combustible liquids and the operation and maintenance of flammable finishing activities. You will also learn about combustible dust production operations and fire safety during construction and demolition.
 
Developed in partnership with the International Code Council. 
 
By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• List motor fuel-dispensing facility requirements
• Describe types of flammable finishing processes and safety requirements
• List required safeguards used to eliminate fire hazards when using powder coating equipment
• Identify the safety requirements for a spray room and spray booth
• Describe IFC requirements for exhaust duct separation distances at point of discharge
• List the commodity hazard classifications
• Describe fire safety requirements during construction and demolition
• Define the IFC regulations regarding activities of hazardous and special processes and uses
2 Fundamental English
2015 International Fire Code Essentials – Hazardous Materials Unwanted fires injure and kill thousands annually and inflict a monetary impact on communities. Did you know that over 40 percent of the businesses that experience a fire never reopen because they lose their customer base? That is why fire code enforcement is an important public safety function.

In this interactive online course, you will learn the basics of the fire code and how to properly apply the code to the most commonly encountered hazards. You will also review the general requirements for hazardous materials and some of the requirements for the proper storage and handling of compressed gasses and flammable and combustible liquids.
Developed in partnership with the International Code Council. 

By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe the specific general requirements for hazardous materials to protect building occupants from an accidental release.
• Identify the health, flammability, and chemical instability of a hazardous material using a hazard identification sign.
• Describe how to handle damaged gas containers that present fire safety and health implications
• Explain the storage, use, handling, and dispensing requirements of flammable and combustible liquids to prevent unwanted fires.
• Recall how many openings a storage tank should have to prevent fatal incidents from occurring.
2 Fundamental English
Lead Safety in Construction: Keeping You Safe and Compliant Lead exposure is a major health issue. Exposure to lead can cause brain damage, paralysis, kidney disease and even death however, there are many methods to protect workers from exposure. In this one-hour interactive course, we will discuss these and other acute and chronic symptoms. We’ll discuss how lead is used in construction and identify the workers that are the most vulnerable to these risks. You’ll be introduced to OSHA’s Lead Standard on the responsibility of employers and how it’s designed to protect workers. Finally, we’ll go over the methods to reduce exposure to lead, including engineering controls as well as the proper protection for workers such as the use of personal protective equipment. At the end of this course, you will be able to:

• Recognize the health hazards and how you can be exposed.
• Identify the specific risks that construction workers face.
• Explain elements of the OSHA standard.
• Discuss the responsibilities of employers.
• Select methods to reduce potential exposure and how personal protective equipment can help.
• Demonstrate the basics of an effective worker protection program that you can implement at your workplace.

1 Fundamental English
Work Zone Safety and Traffic Control Failure to follow traffic control device procedures could result in serious injury or death for workers, motorists, pedestrians, and the disabled. This interactive online course teaches you how to plan for the installation and removal of Temporary Traffic Control (TTC). This course will provide training on developing transportation management plans, safely guiding users through roadway operations, providing acceptable levels of operations, evaluating unsafe conditions and ongoing maintenance needs, and managing all personnel involved in the planning. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• List key elements of worker safety and TTC management
• Describe qualifications for flaggers
• Identify traits for automated flagger assistance devices
• Identify the proper way to implement turn prohibitions to avoid unsafe conflict
• Identify appropriate situations in which sidewalk closures are necessary for safety and to accommodate work zone operations
• Select the proper warning sign indicators
• Identify acceptable lane width in various situations to promote safety and efficiency
2 Fundamental English
Protecting Your Team Against Workplace Violence Workplace violence can occur at or outside the workplace and can range from threats and verbal abuse to physical assaults and homicide, one of the leading causes of job-related deaths. It can occur at any time and be perpetrated by anyone you may come in contact with at work. However it manifests itself, workplace violence is a growing concern for employers and employees nationwide. This interactive, online course will present the factors that contribute to violence in the workplace and how to spot problem behavior and prevent violent incidents. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Define workplace violence and explain the four categories of workplace violence
• Present key facts about workplace violence
• List risk factors for potential violence in the workplace
• Describe several ways to prevent violence at work
• Prioritize post-incident reporting and response procedures
• List the key elements in a workplace violence prevention policy
• Discuss how to handle situations of workplace violence
• Describe how to react with first responders during workplace or targeted violence situation
1 Fundamental English
Active Shooter and Other Acts of Targeted Violence Active shooter or threat suspects are bent on killing as many people as quickly as possible in most cases. Knowing how to react in a targeted violence situation can increase your chances of survival.
 
This interactive online course will teach you about various types of targeted violence. You will learn how to improve your chances of survival by preparing for targeted violence. You will also learn about the precautions for targeted violence and the indicators and traits to look out for so you'll know what to expect in various situations. Finally, you'll be trained on how to react to targeted violence by identifying roles and responsibilities and relaying communication effectively so that you can calmly interact with first responders.
 
By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe active shooter and active threat profiles
• Identify ways to prepare for targeted violence situations
• Describe options for dealing with an active shooter or threat
• List recommendations for interacting with first responders during targeted violence situations
 
1 Fundamental English
Fire and Smoke Dampers Simplified Fire and smoke dampers are essential components of fire and life safety systems of a building. Their operation prevents the spread of fire and smoke and allows building occupants to safely exit a building during a fire. Fire and smoke dampers are also vital to the integrity of fire and smoke rated building assemblies. Improper specifications, installation, actuation or simply the lack of fire and smoke dampers can result in damage to a building or worse, loss of human life. This interactive online course will discuss fire walls, fire barriers, smoke barriers, fire partitions and horizontal assemblies. At the end of this course, you will be able to:

• Identify the four types of fire and smoke dampers and correctly differentiate each type.
• Identify the type and rating of a fire damper's fusible link.
• Specify the appropriate type of fire or smoke damper for an HVAC duct penetration given a building's occupancy, construction type and wall/ceiling classification.
• Specify the appropriate actuation methods for a fire/smoke damper knowing the type of fire alarm system installed in a building.
• Specify the appropriate fire or smoke damper given the above conditions and the UL listing of the damper.

1 Intermediate English
Hazardous Waste Essentials Are you confused by all of the jargon and acronyms used regarding hazardous waste and remediation? What do you know about the latest real or perceived threats to groundwater or air quality? Do you want to learn whether your neighbor’s stash of trash and rusted drums is merely annoying or legally hazardous? This interactive online course covers the origins of hazardous waste and the legislation set in place by the U.S. government and other global entities to mitigate risk and encourage pollution prevention. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
 
Define hazardous waste and identify its origins
Discuss the history of hazardous waste in the U.S.
Describe hazardous waste legislation
Relate the relationship between the Resource and Conservation Recovery Act and the basic Superfund process 
Explain hazardous waste management in terms of risk assessment and pollution prevention
Discuss hazardous waste management in countries outside the U.S.
1 Intermediate English
2015 International Fire Code®: Significant Changes Maintaining the life safety of building occupants, the protection of emergency responders, and limiting the damage to a building and its contents is of paramount importance. The purpose of 2015 International Fire Code®: Significant Changes is to familiarize fire officials, building officials, plans examiners, fire inspectors, design professionals and others with many of the important changes in the 2015 International Fire Code (IFC®). This interactive, online course is designed to assist code users in identifying the specific code changes that have occurred and, more important, in understanding the reasons behind the changes. It is also a valuable resource for jurisdictions in their code adoption process.

 

Developed in partnership with the International Code Council®.

By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Determine when emergency power systems shall automatically provide secondary power after primary power is lost
• Identify the type of power required for electrical loads where interruption of the primary power could create hazards or hamper rescue or fire-fighting operations
• List the conditions in which the fire code official is authorized to permit the removal of existing occupant-use hose lines
• Recognize where ionization smoke alarms should be installed
• Recall the building occupancy type in which carbon monoxide detection is and is not required
• Determine in which cases sprinkler detection is and is not required
2 Fundamental English
General Electrical Hazard Awareness for Site Safety Electrical safety is essential for all businesses. Understanding necessary electrical standards and compliances is essential for keeping your employees and your site safe. Has your organization defined what electrical risks you may have? Are you fully in compliance? Do you have all the proper electrical personal protective equipment needed? If OSHA audited your site today, would you have any electrical safety violations? This interactive online course is geared towards all businesses regardless of industry and will focus on what you need to know as well as useful tips and best practices regarding overall general electrical safety within your organization. At the end of this course, you will be able to:

• Define the three electrical hazards
• Recall the different effects of shock on the body
• List the three different arc flash boundaries and the PPE needed to enter each one
• Identify standards that help your company meet compliance for the safety of workers and clients
• List the four categories of personal protective equipment and the items in each

1 Intermediate English
NFPA 70E® – 2018 Updates Have you reviewed the recent changes from NFPA 70E® 2018? Electrical safety is essential for all businesses and industries and there are many companies that need assistance and guidance in keeping their workers safe. This interactive online course will cover the most recent updates and changes from NFPA 70E® 2018 as well as offer some education on what we need to be doing to stay compliant from an electrical safety perspective as it relates to these new updates. Upon completion, you will walk away with a much better understanding of what can be done to reach electrical compliance. At the end of this course, you will be able to:
 
• Recall the 2018 changes to NFPA 70E®
• Recall the steps necessary to protect your employees
• List the three different arc flash boundaries and the PPE needed to enter each one
• Name the four categories of personal protective equipment and the items in each
• Recall the six point plan for electrical safety
1 Intermediate English
General Electrical Hazard Awareness and NFPA 70E® 2018 Electrical safety is essential for all electrical workers. Understanding necessary electrical standards and compliances is essential for keeping yourself safe. Are you able to identify the electrical risks you may be exposed to? Have you reviewed the recent changes from NFPA 70E 2018? Are you fully in compliance? Do you have all the proper electrical personal protective equipment needed? If OSHA audited your site today, would you be in violation? This interactive online course is geared towards anyone working directly with electrically charged components and will focus on what you need to know as well as useful tips and best practices in regards to overall general electrical safety.  This course will also cover the most recent updates and changes from NFPA 70E 2018 as well as offer some education on what we need to be doing to stay compliant from an electrical safety perspective as it relates to these new updates. Upon completion, you will walk away with a much better understanding of what can be done to reach electrical compliance.  At the end of this course, you will be able to: 
• Define the three electrical hazards
• Recall the different effects of shock on the body
• List the three different arc flash boundaries and the PPE needed to enter each one
• List the 4 categories of personal protective equipment and the items in each
• Establish and verify an electrically safe work condition using the 8 steps from Article 120.5 of the NFPA 70E
1 Intermediate English
Lab Safety: Electrical Safety in the Laboratory This interactive course on Electrical Safety in the Laboratory emphasizes the need for safety when using electricity, and discusses how to reduce the potential for accidents involving electrical shock, fire and explosions. Using a powerful combination of audio, full-motion video, text and colorful graphics, this course provides the most cost-effective safety and regulatory compliance training available today. The course is divided into a number of logical sections so information is easily understood… and retained. 0.5 Intermediate English
Lab Safety: Flammables & Explosives in the Laboratory This interactive course on Flammables and Explosives in the Laboratory discusses the nature of flammable and explosive materials, as well as hazards associated with their use. It also reviews the proper handling procedures and personal protective equipment that should be used when working with these substances. Using a powerful combination of audio, full-motion video, text and colorful graphics, this course provides the most cost-effective safety and regulatory compliance training available today. The course is divided into a number of logical sections so information is easily understood… and retained. 0.5 Intermediate English
Lab Safety: GHS Safety Data Sheets in the Laboratory This interactive course on GHS Safety Data Sheets in the Laboratory reviews the composition of GHS Safety Data Sheets, the information that's contained in each section and how SDS's are different from Material Safety Data Sheets. Using a powerful combination of audio, full-motion video, text and colorful graphics, this course provides the most cost-effective safety and regulatory compliance training available today. The course is divided into a number of logical sections so information is easily understood… and retained. 0.5 Intermediate English
Lab Safety: Handling Compressed Gas Cylinders in the Laboratory This interactive course on Handling Compressed Gas Cylinders in the Laboratory examines how gas cylinders work, the hazards that are associated with them and the need for caution when using or storing a cylinder. Using a powerful combination of audio, full-motion video, text and colorful graphics, this course provides the most cost-effective safety and regulatory compliance training available today. The course is divided into a number of logical sections so information is easily understood… and retained. 0.5 Intermediate English
Lab Safety: Laboratory Ergonomics This interactive course on Laboratory Ergonomics discusses the need to set up work areas correctly, as well as how to minimize the strain of using laboratory equipment, tools and instruments. Using a powerful combination of audio, full-motion video, text and colorful graphics, this course provides the most cost-effective safety and regulatory compliance training available today. The course is divided into a number of logical sections so information is easily understood… and retained. 0.5 Intermediate English
Lab Safety: Laboratory Hoods MARCOM's interactive course on Laboratory Hoods emphasizes how to properly use laboratory hoods and how to test them to ensure correct functioning… as well as discusses how hoods can protect an experiment, the facility, and most importantly, the employee. Using a powerful combination of audio, full-motion video, text and colorful graphics, this course provides the most cost-effective safety and regulatory compliance training available today. The course is divided into a number of logical sections so information is easily understood… and retained. 0.5 Intermediate English
Lab Safety: Orientation to Laboratory Safety This nteractive course on Orientation to Laboratory Safety shows both new employees and seasoned veterans the importance of safety in the laboratory… as well as reviews the OSHA regulations and good safety practices that apply to the laboratory environment. Using a powerful combination of audio, full-motion video, text and colorful graphics, this course provides the most cost-effective safety and regulatory compliance training available today. The course is divided into a number of logical sections so information is easily understood… and retained. 0.5 Intermediate English
Lab Safety: OSHA Formaldehyde Standard This interactive course on The OSHA Formaldehyde Standard provides training that is required by this standard, and focuses on the rules and procedures that the standard establishes for working with this potentially dangerous chemical. Using a powerful combination of audio, full-motion video, text and colorful graphics, this course provides the most cost-effective safety and regulatory compliance training available today. The course is divided into a number of logical sections so information is easily understood… and retained. 0.5 Intermediate English
Lab Safety: Planning for Laboratory Emergencies This interactive course on Planning for Laboratory Emergencies discusses how to minimize damage and prevent injuries if an emergency should occur. Using a powerful combination of audio, full-motion video, text and colorful graphics, this course provides the most cost-effective safety and regulatory compliance training available today. The course is divided into a number of logical sections so information is easily understood… and retained. 0.5 Intermediate English
Lab Safety: Preventing Contamination in the Laboratory This interactive course on Preventing Contamination in the Laboratory emphasizes the need to recognize situations that could lead to contamination, and discusses what can be done to prevent contamination from occurring. Using a powerful combination of audio, full-motion video, text and colorful graphics, this course provides the most cost-effective safety and regulatory compliance training available today. The course is divided into a number of logical sections so information is easily understood… and retained. 0.5 Intermediate English
Lab Safety: Safe Handling of Laboratory Glassware This interactive course on Safe Handling of Laboratory Glassware discusses the nature of various types of glassware, and the problems it can cause… as well as the need for employees to use and maintain laboratory glassware safely. Using a powerful combination of audio, full-motion video, text and colorful graphics, this course provides the most cost-effective safety and regulatory compliance training available today. The course is divided into a number of logical sections so information is easily understood… and retained. 0.5 Intermediate English
Lab Safety: Safety Showers & Eye Washes in the Laboratory This interactive course on Safety Showers and Eye Washes in the Laboratory reviews the correct ways to use this equipment, and emphasizes the need for quick action after a chemical splash or spill. Using a powerful combination of audio, full-motion video, text and colorful graphics, this course provides the most cost-effective safety and regulatory compliance training available today. The course is divided into a number of logical sections so information is easily understood… and retained. 0.5 Intermediate English
Emergency Management Guide This 4-hour online course offers step-by-step guidelines for creating and maintaining a comprehensive emergency management program-including planning, response, and recovery-for a variety of common hazards, such as:

• Fire
• Hazardous materials incidents
• Floods and flash floods
• Hurricanes
• Tornadoes
• Severe winter storms
• Earthquakes
• Technological emergencies

The goal of this course is to familiarize you with the core operational considerations of emergency management, including:

• Direction and control
• Communications
• Life safety
• Property protection
• Community outreach
• Recovery and restoration
• Administration and logistics

This course is of interest to utility managers, high-rise building managers, industrial complex managers, or any small or large business operator.

There is a test included at the end of this course.

After completing this course, you  should understand how to:
• Form a planning team.
• Conduct a vulnerability analysis.
• Develop and implement a plan.
• Build emergency management capabilities.
• Identify hazards that may threaten your facility.
• List sources for additional information.
4 Fundamental English
Fire! Designing Means of Escape Understanding fire is the first step toward designing features to prevent and protect against it. We cannot eliminate the potential for fire, but we can achieve a high level of fire safety by applying fundamental life safety principles during building planning, design, and operation.

This 2-hour online course focuses on one of the important life safety protection features-adequate means of egress-in the context of two of the leading codes used in the U.S. today:  the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA®) Life Safety Code, and the International Code Council (ICC) International Fire Code.

There is a test at the end of this course.

The goal of this course is to provide an overview of basic fire safety design considerations affecting number and capacity of means of egress in an occupied space.

After completing this course, you should be able to:

 

• Describe characteristics of fire and common flammable substances
• Identify major codes and regulations that affect fire safety design
• Discuss fundamental life safety principles and their application to means of egress
• Complete simple calculations of occupant load and exit capacity

2 Advanced English
Asbestos Management This three hour online interactive course is based on the Environmental Protection Agency's Handbook for Managing Asbestos in Place. Asbestos containing materials are still found in hundreds of thousands of buildings, so it is important for members of the construction industry to know how to deal with it. Asbestos is dangerous when its fibers are released into the air, so removing the asbestos is not always the best course of action. This course focuses on how to start and run a successful asbestos operations and maintenance program. This course includes a multiple choice quiz at the end of each section. At the conclusion of this course, the student will be more familiar with:
• The purpose and scope of an O&M program

• How to start an O&M program

• How to implement and manage an O&M program

• Training and work practices involved with an O&M program

• Regulations related to asbestos management programs

3 Advanced English
Asbestos: What Is It and Who Should Remove It? Thousands of building products contain the mineral asbestos. Asbestos was widely used from the 1940s to the 1970s because it is strong, flexible, and flame resistant. However, it can lead to some very serious health problems if it is not handled and removed correctly. This interactive online course is aimed at informing the student about the health risks concerning asbestos, and the methods of safely removing it.  After completing this course, you will be able to:

• Describe the composition of asbestos and how it is used.
• Explain the health risks of asbestos exposure.
• List the EPA asbestos regulations.
• Illustrate how asbestos should be safely removed.

3 Advanced English
OSHA Electrical Regulations This five hour interactive online course is a brief review of Electrical Regulations as posted under Subpart K, Part 1926, from OSHA's Safety and Health Regulations for Construction. The course covers:

• General Requirements

• Wiring Design and Protection

• Wiring Methods, Components and Equipment for General Use

• Specific Purpose Installations

• Hazardous Locations

• Special Systems

• Lockout and Tagging of circuits

• Maintenance of Equipment

• Environmental Deterioration of Equipment

• Batteries and Battery Charging

This course includes a multiple choice quiz at the end of each section.

After completing this course, you will be able to:

• Describe the general OSHA requirements for electrical applications.
• State the OSHA requirements for wiring design and protection.
• List the OSHA requirements for wiring methods, and components and equipment for general use.
• Explain the OSHA requirements for specific purpose equipment and installations, hazardous locations, and special systems.
• Describe the OSHA requirements for lockout and tagging of circuits, maintenance of equipment, environmental deterioration of equipment, and batteries and battery charging.

5 Intermediate English
OSHA Fatal Accidents & Prevention Safety should be at the top of every professional's priority list. Controlling safety in the workplace means supplying the proper equipment, training and instructions. Unsafe working conditions or improperly trained workers can result in serious injuries, and even death. This online course is developed from OSHA accident reports and is taken directly from OSHA's Fatal Facts. It covers numerous types of accidents, including the following:

• Falls

• Struck By Nail

• Explosions

• Struck by Collapsing Crane Boom

• Caught in or Between

• Crushed by Falling Wall

• Struck by Falling Object

• Electrocution

Each section of the course includes a summary of an actual accident and the site conditions at the time of the accident. The student will be given details about the accident and then go over recommendations from OSHA on how that accident could have been prevented. At the conclusion of each section a very brief multiple choice quiz follows.

At the conclusion of this course, the student will::
• Implement OSHA safety requirements for the prevention of falls and being struck by a nail.
• Demonstrate the OSHA safety requirements for the prevention of explosions and being struck by a collapsing crane boom.
• Apply OSHA safety requirements for the prevention of being caught in or between, and crushed by a falling wall.
• Institute OSHA safety requirements for the prevention of being struck by a falling object, and electrocution.
2 Intermediate English
Preventing and Investigating Accidents This two hour interactive online course is taken from OSHA material and is broken down into two sections: (a) preventing accidents and (b) investigating accidents. The first part focuses on how employers can prevent accidents by conducting a job hazard analysis. The process is broken down into four sections:
• Breaking down the job
• Identifying hazards
• Recommending safe procedures and protection
• Revising the job hazard analysis
However, accidents do happen, even when safety precautions are taken, so the second part of the course focuses on how to investigate an accident if and when one happens.

The following investigative procedures will be discussed:

• Inspecting the accident site
• Interviewing victims and witnesses
• Preparing an accident report

After completing this course, you will be able to:
• Discuss different types of construction jobs and identify hazards as the first steps in preventing accidents.
• Understand recommended safe procedures and practices for preventing accidents.
• Comprehend the job hazard analysis to understand the hazards inherent to your job
• Discuss proper procedures for investigating accidents, interviewing witnesses and preparing an accident report.
2 Fundamental English
OSHA Demolition This interactive online course is a brief review of Regulations regarding Demolition as posted under Subpart T, Part 1926, from OSHA's Safety and Health Regulations for Construction. The course covers rules for the following topics:

• Preparatory Operations

• Stairs, Passageways & Ladders

• Chutes

• Removal of Materials through Floor Openings

• Removal of Walls, Masonry Sections & Chimneys

• Manual Removal of Floors

• Removal of Walls, Floors & Material with Equipment

• Storage

• Removal of Steel Construction

• Mechanical Demolition

After reading over the OSHA material, a multiple choice quiz follows.

At the conclusion of this course the student will be familiar with Subpart T, Part 1926 of OSHA’s Safety and Health Regulations for Construction. They will become more knowledgeable in requirements for:
• Illustrate the demolition preparatory operations required by OSHA.
• Ensure implementation of OSHA requirements for the demolition of stairs, passageways and ladders, chutes, and the removal of materials through floor openings.
• Explain OSHA requirements for the removal of walls, masonry sections and chimneys, manual removal of floors, and removal of walls, floors and material with equipment.
• Apply OSHA requirements regarding storage, removal of steel construction, and mechanical demolition.
1 Intermediate English
OSHA Signs, Signals & Barricades This one hour interactive online course is a brief review of Signs, Signals and Barricades Regulations as posted under Subpart G, Part 1926, from OSHA's Safety and Health Regulations for Construction. The course covers:

• Accident Prevention signs and tags

• Signaling

• Barricades

After reading over the OSHA material, a brief multiple choice quiz follows. 

At the conclusion of this course the student will be familiar with Subpart G, Part 1926 of OSHA’s Safety and Health Regulations for Construction- Signs, Signals and Barricades. They will become more knowledgeable in requirements for:

• Accident prevention signs and tags
• Signaling
• Knowing where to find the requirements for the Barricades portion in the American National Standards Institute Manual.
• Be familiar with Subpart G, Part 1926 of OSHA's Safety and Health Regulations.

1 Intermediate English
OSHA Concrete and Masonry Construction This online course is a brief review of Concrete and Masonry Construction Regulations as posted under Subpart Q, Part 1926, from OSHA's Safety and Health Regulations for Construction. The course covers:

• Requirements for equipment and tools

• Requirements for cast-in-place concrete

• General requirements for formwork

• Requirements for precast concrete

• Requirements for lift-slab operations

• Requirements for masonry construction

After reading over the OSHA material, a multiple choice quiz follows.

At the conclusion of this course the student will be familiar with Subpart Q, Part 1926 of OSHA’s Safety and Health Regulations for Construction- Concrete and Masonry Construction. They will become more knowledgeable in requirements for:
• Describe the scope, application, and definitions of the OSHA regulations regarding concrete and masonry construction.
• List the OSHA general requirements and requirements for equipment and tools.
• Explain the OSHA requirements for cast-in-place, formwork, and precast concrete.
•  Illustrate the OSHA requirements of lift-slab operations and masonry construction.
2 Intermediate English
OSHA Fire Protection & Prevention This four hour interactive online course is a review of OSHA''s Fire Prevention and Protection Regulations taken directly from Subpart F, Part 1926, Safety and Health Regulations for Construction. It is broken up into 5 parts:

• Fire Protection and Prevention

• Flammable & Combustible Liquids Part I

• Flammable & Combustible Liquids Part II

• Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LP-Gas)

• Temporary Heating Devices

This course includes a multiple choice quiz at the end of each section.

After completing this course, you will be able to:

• State the OSHA requirements for fire protection and prevention.
• Illustrate the OSHA requirements for flammable & combustible liquids.
• Describe the OSHA requirements for liquefied petroleum gas (LP-Gas).
• List the OSHA requirements for temporary heating devices.

4 Intermediate English
OSHA Welding and Cutting This two hour interactive online course is a brief review of Government Regulations regarding Welding and Cutting as posted under Subpart J, Part 1926, from OSHA's Safety and Health Regulations for Construction. The course reviews the following topics:

• Gas Welding and Cutting

• Arc Welding and Cutting

• Fire Prevention

• Ventilation and Protection in welding, cutting and heating

• Welding, Cutting and Heating in way of preservative coatings

After reading over the OSHA material, a brief multiple choice quiz follows.

After completing this course, you will be able to:
• Explain OSHA requirements for gas welding and cutting.
• Describe OSHA requirements for arc welding and cutting.
• Follow OSHA requirements for fire prevention.
• Ensure implementation of OSHA requirements for ventilation and protection in welding, cutting and heating.
• Apply OSHA requirements for welding, cutting and heating in way of preservative coatings.
2 Intermediate English
Safety – An Introduction (General Industry) Safety deals with immediate or acute hazards while health deals with long term or chronic hazards. Safety and health should be a primary concern both at work and at home.While this 1-hour interactive online course is not a comprehensive course in safety, it serves to introduce the student to some common hazards and preventative methods. Sometimes simple is better, especially when it comes to an important subject like safety. If there is too much information presented at one time, the student might not retain any of it. This course gives the student regulatory contacts and references if they want more information.

There will be a multiple-choice quiz at the end of this course.

After completing this course, you should be familiar with:

• Various hand tools and machinery hazards
• The effects of carbon monoxide
• The proper type of fire extinguisher to use with a particular type of fire
• How to store and use gasoline safely
• Procedures for reducing the risk of cumulative trauma disorders
• Regulating organizations
• General hazard reduction methods
• The hazards of electric shock
• Computer workplace ergonomics
• The basics of chemical hazards
• Falling hazards

1 Fundamental English
OSHA Underground Construction This interactive online course is a brief review of Government Regulations regarding Underground Construction, Caissons, Cofferdams and Compressed Air as posted under Subpart S, Part 1926, from OSHA's Safety and Health Regulations for Construction. The course is broken into sections:

• Underground Construction Part I

• Underground Construction Part II

• Caissons & Cofferdams

• Compressed Air

After reading over the OSHA material, a brief multiple choice quiz follows each section.

At the conclusion of this course the student will be familiar with Subpart S, Part 1926 of OSHA’s Safety and Health Regulations for Construction. They will become more knowledgeable in requirements for:
• Describe the OSHA regulations regarding underground construction.
• Apply OSHA regulations regarding compressed air.
• Implement OSHA regulations regarding caissons.
• Observe the OSHA regulations regarding cofferdams.
4 Intermediate English
OSHA Tools – Hand and Power This interactive online course is a brief review of Government Regulations regarding Tools- Hand and Power as posted under Subpart I, Part 1926, from OSHA's Safety and Health Regulations for Construction. The course covers:

• Hand Tools

• Power-operated hand tools

• Abrasive wheels and tools

• Woodworking tools

• Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic

• Air receivers

• Mechanical power transmission apparatus

After reading over the OSHA material, a brief multiple choice quiz follows. 

After completing this course, you will be able to:

• Follow OSHA general requirements for hand and power tools.
• Illustrate the OSHA requirements for abrasive wheels and tools, woodworking tools ,and jacks-lever and ratchet.
• Adhere to OSHA requirements for screw and hydraulic tools and air receivers.
• Apply the OSHA requirements for mechanical power transmission apparatus.

3 Intermediate English
Excavation Safety and Shoring/OSHA New construction projects usually involve excavation for utilities or foundations. The safety of personnel in excavations is regulated by OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration). If personnel enter a trench that is over 5 feet in depth*, a OSHA excavation safety plan is needed. OSHA dictates standards for shoring, sloped sidewalls, hazardous atmosphere, access, and other aspects of excavation projects.

A total of 48 fatalities from cave-ins of excavations, was reported for 2003, by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. OSHA reports that failure to use shoring and follow regulatory procedures results in most deaths.

This four hour interactive online course will give the student a basic understanding of OSHA approvable shoring, sloped sidewall trenches, and safety measures for excavations. As a engineer, or OSHA defined competent person, you will learn valuable skills in identification of site conditions, selection of shoring, construction, and inspection.

* The specified trench depth is different in some states; and poor site conditions may dictate shoring at shallower depths.

At the conclusion of this course, the student will achieve the following goals:

• Knowledge of Federal Regulations for Excavation Safety as governed by the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA).
• Ability to analyze site conditions and recommend shoring that is in compliance with OSHA regulations.
• Skills in shoring design, and the applicability and limitations of shoring options. However the class does not cover engineering and design work, beyond OSHA limitations.
• Learn to use Internet websites to access regulations and information on shoring.
• Acquire competence in inspection of constructed shoring for compliance with OSHA safety regulations.
• Increase skills to assist in obtaining OSHA "Competent Person" status.

4 Advanced English
Safety: Machine Operation

In this 4-hour interactive online course, you'll gain a better understanding of the work practices necessary to operate industrial machinery, such as a bench-top drill press or a 10-ton mechanical power press, safely. You'll learn how the principles and practices used to keep you safe from injury can be incorporated into your daily routine.

Providing a safe work environment is the responsibility of your employer. It's your responsibility to work as safely as possible at all times, especially when using power-driven machinery. Awareness and sound practice of the safety procedures you'll learn offer your best defense against work-place injuries. In this course, you'll learn the skills needed to become a productive and safe industrial machine operator.

This course includes helpful exercises and a test at the end of each section.

At the completion of this course, you will be able to:

• Recognize the basic machine motions that can present a hazard to you
• Recognize the types of machinery most likely to be hazardous to you
• Understand the types of injuries caused by accidents commonly associated with unsafe machine-operating procedures
• Discuss the importance of machine guarding and how to incorporate methods of guarding to avoid physical injury
• Recognize the four basic types of machine guards commonly used in industry
• Control various forms of hazardous machine energy through the use of lockout/tagout procedures
• Understand how and why to properly use personal protective equipment for added protection when using industrial equipment

4 Intermediate English
Safety: Material-Handling

This 2-hour interactive online course introduces you to the safe techniques and work practices commonly used when handling manufacturing and industrial materials. You'll learn the procedures necessary to avoid physical injury to yourself and those working with you, for both manual handling methods and mechanical handling methods. You'll also learn procedures that minimize damage to the materials you're moving as well as to facility property. Knowing the proper procedures will also give you the insight to decide when mechanical handling is necessary, or perhaps preferred, over traditional physical handling.

This course includes helpful exercises and a test at the end of each section.

At the completion of this course, you will be able to:

• Recognize the hazards associated with handling materials
• Know the types of injuries that can be caused by these hazards
• Understand how to effectively use safe material-handling practices
• Know how to avoid physical injury when handling loads
• Know and follow the rules for safe operation of powered industrial material-handling equipment
• Understand and respect the limits and restrictions placed on powered material-handling mechanisms

2 Fundamental English
Safety: Trades As you learn the skills and tasks needed to perform your job, you may have little interest in safety. However, a thorough knowledge of safe practices is an important part of working in any industrial setting. Every industrial worker (no matter what job they do) should be familiar with accident prevention techniques, fire safety methods, and the use of personal protective equipment.

Injuries in the workplace cost many millions of dollars in medical costs, lost wages, and production losses each year. Many injuries can be prevented by understanding how accidents and injuries can occur. This 3-hour interactive online course is designed to help you understand why safety in the work-place is so important, and to present you with some information about safety that goes beyond the common sense you already have.

This course includes helpful exercises and a test at the end of each section.

At the conclusion of this course, you will be able to:

• Name the agencies and organizations that make and enforce safety regulations, and explain an employee's responsibilities under those regulations
• List the physical hazards associated with chemicals and describe how to avoid those hazards
• Name several electrical shock hazards and the techniques used to prevent shocks
• List the steps in a lock out and tag procedure
• Explain the importance of machine guarding, and name several types of machine guards
• Name the four classes of fire and how to extinguish each of them
• Describe the proper technique used to lift a heavy load
• Explain how to avoid hand injuries when using hand tools and power tools
• List some of the hazards involved in welding and hot cutting operations and how to prevent them
• Explain how job analysis and the science of ergonomics are used to improve the workplace
• Explain the importance of using personal protective equipment (PPE) and name several types of PPE

3 Fundamental English
Safety: Welding Part 1 – Gas Cylinders & Oxy-fuel Systems Welding and cutting are processes used in manufacturing to join and separate pieces of metal by heating them to their melting point. These processes are also commonly used in construction, demolition, maintenance, and repair work.

This 3-hour interactive online course is the first of a two-part series that covers the important safety facts and practices involving the high-pressure and low-pressure gases used in welding. You'll learn general welding safety as well as specific safety practices. You'll also learn about controlling heat sources from welding operations to protect yourself from harm and your facility from fire. Specifically, this course looks at:

• Safety in welding and cutting
• Safe handling and storage of gas cylinders
• Use of Oxy-fuel welding and cutting systems

At the conclusion of this course, you will be able to:

• Identify common welding gases and understand how they're used in welding operations
• Point out the hazards associated with welding gases
• Safely handle and store different types of gas cylinders
• Safely operate a basic gas welding setup
• Recognize the safety considerations involved in the setup and operation of electric arc-welding equipment
• Identify welding equipment malfunctions and take corrective action

3 Intermediate English
Automotive Turn Signal & Hazard Flashers – Federal Requirements This 1-hour interactive online course covers the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Department Of Transportation Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 108 (FMVSS108) and how it applies to turn signal and hazard warning flasher modules.

It answers the questions 'What are turn signals/hazard flashers and how do they work?' and 'Who has to comply?' This course includes a multiple-choice quiz at the end.

After completion of the course, the student should:

• Have a thorough understanding of the federal requirements for turn signal and hazard warning flashers.
• Understand the testing and performance requirements required by FMVSS108.

1 Fundamental English
Safety: Fire Part 1 – Workplace Fire Hazards & Preventing Fires Fires are the most destructive and expensive of all accidents. However, fires can be effectively prevented through the combined use of technology and common sense. By understanding how fires get started and how to extinguish them, you'll have much of the knowledge you need to protect yourself from the dangers of fire. This 3-hour online course is the first of a two-part series and introduces you to the information you need to practice fire safety and prevention in the workplace. This course includes exercises and a test at the end of each section.

At the conclusion of this course, you will be able to:

• Describe the types of property losses and injuries associated with fires
• Explain how fires are ignited
• Identify the four classes of fire
• Describe the primary fire hazards found in the workplace
• Explain the various ways in which fires can be prevented

3 Fundamental English
Safety: Welding Part 2 – Equipment Use & Welder Protection Welding and cutting are processes used in manufacturing to join and separate pieces of metal by heating them to their melting point. These processes are also commonly used in construction, demolition, maintenance, and repair work.

This 2-hour interactive online course is the second in a two-part series and will teach you important safety facts and practices involving the high-pressure and low-pressure gases used in welding. This course covers welding equipment and protection of welders. Specifically, this course looks at:

• Safe operation of welding equipment
• Safe use of electric-arc welding equipment
• Protection of welders and welding facilities

This course includes exercises and a test at the end of each section.

At the completion of this course, you will be able to:

• Utilize fire prevention and protection methods specific to welding operations
• Discuss the importance of the hot-work-permit program in your facility
• Explain the correct use of protective clothing and equipment for welding
• Utilize proper ventilation when welding
• Effectively deal with confined spaces when performing welding operations

2 Intermediate English
Lead Safety This five hour interactive online course focuses on preventing and dealing with lead poisoning in the construction industry. Overexposure to lead is one of the most common overexposures found in industry, particularly the construction industry. The course is broken up into five sections, each covering a different aspect of lead exposure, or tasks associated with lead exposure. A quiz follows each section. The course tackles the following issues:
• Worker protection programs

• Engineering controls

• Housekeeping and personal hygiene practices

• Protective clothing

• Respiratory protection

• Medical surveillance

• A variety of work practices

• Setting up a Personal Protection Equipment Program

• The standards you should follow to pick the right PPE for the job

• How to use PPE

• How to manage the PPE program

• Information on different lead hazards, including names, descriptions, and symptoms

• Information on other hazardous materials associated with welding

At the conclusion of this course, the student will have a better knowledge of:
• Lead exposure in construction

• Tactics to limit lead exposure in construction

• Medical and Administrative tactics for dealing with lead exposure

• Personal Protection Equipment

• Lead Related Hazardous and Toxic Substances

• Hazardous and Toxic Substances related to Welding, Cutting and Brazing

5 Advanced English
Personal Protective Equipment People who work in the construction industry can encounter a variety of health hazards. Wearing personal protective equipment can reduce the risk of many of these hazards, and in some cases, save lives. This 1-hour interactive online course focuses on what is involved with facilitating a personal protective equipment program. The course examines how to identify and evaluate hazards in the workplace, how to determine if using PPE is an appropriate control measure, and if so, what type will be used. The course also covers employee training, and helpful information on selecting appropriate PPE.

 

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

• Develop an appropriate PPE plan for your worksite
• Identify the PPE responsibilities of supervisors, employees, and OSHA
• Discuss a variety of PPE equipment
• Recognize appropriate PPE Training subjects

 

1 Fundamental English
OSHA Pressure Vessel Chemical Cracking A pressure vessel is a storage tank or vessel that has been designed to operate at pressures above 15 p.s.i.g. Recent inspections of pressure vessels have shown that there are a considerable number of cracked and damaged vessels in workplaces. Cracked and damaged vessels can result in leakage or rupture failures. Potential health and safety hazards of leaking vessels include poisonings, suffocations, fires, and explosion hazards. Rupture failures can be much more catastrophic and can cause considerable damage to life and property. The safe design, installation, operation, and maintenance of pressure vessels in accordance with the appropriate codes and standards are essential to worker safety and health.

This 1-hour interactive online course is based on Section IV: Chapter 3 of the U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) Technical Manual, Pressure Vessel Guidelines. This course focuses on pressure vessels and low pressure storage tanks used in process, pulp and paper, petroleum refining, and petrochemical industries for water treatment systems of boilers and steam generation.

At the conclusion of this course, you will have a better understanding of:

• Recent cracking experience in pressure vessels such as those used for deaerator service, amine service, wet hydrogent sulfide storage, ammonia service, and pulp digester service
• Nondestructive Examination Methods (NDE)
• Safety assessment information
• Proper recordkeeping data for steel vessels and low pressure storage tanks

There will be a multiple choice quiz at the end of the course to gauge your understanding of the material.

1 Fundamental English
Environmental Risks in Construction This 2-hour interactive online course contains case summaries of six court decisions involving design professionals or contractors who performed environmental remediation work or encountered environmental conditions on job sites and incurred risk or liability as a result. Other cases that are discussed include potential Superfund liability of an engineer, suits against remediation engineers and contractors, asbestos liability of a construction contractor, and the question of whether damages are covered under a commercial general liability policy.

There will be a multiple-choice quiz at the end of this course.

At the conclusion of this course, the student will:
• Describe litigation theories used to create environmental liability against design firms and contractors.
• Manage the sensitive risk of environmental liability on projects.
• Explain how insurance may or may not cover claims related to mold and asbestos.
• Critically examine insurance policy language regarding environmental liability.
 

 

2 Intermediate English
Toxic Mold: Managing the Legal & Insurance Risks This 3-hour interactive online course contains practical, 'how-to-do-it,' advice on the current toxic mold litigation environment and how to avoid being the target of a mold claim. The course first reviews the background for mold litigation, including the reasons that mold has become a concern and the types of construction problems giving rise to mold infestation in facilities. Then it provides an in-depth discussion of the common law and statutory bases for liability for mold. It reviews several reported decisions that have addressed mold liability. Finally, the course addresses how the targets of mold claims can defend themselves, and how insurance has responded to these claims. It concludes by providing some risk management approaches to avoiding mold liability. This course was developed by Michael C. Loulakis, a nationally recognized construction lawyer who has 25 years of experience working with design professional liability issues.

 

After completing this course, you will be able to:

• Explain the current toxic mold litigation environment.
• Describe the types of construction problems that give rise to mold infestation in facilities.
• Discuss the common law, statutory law, and court decisions that have addressed mold liability.
• Describe how to insure and defend yourself against mold claims.
• Employ risk management approaches to avoid mold liability.

3 Intermediate English
Safety: Fire Part 2 – Fire Protection Equipment & Techniques Fires are the most destructive and expensive of all accidents. However, fires can be effectively prevented through the combined use of technology and common sense. By understanding how fires get started and how to extinguish them, you'll have much of the knowledge you need to protect yourself from the dangers of fire. This 2-hour interactive online course is the second in a two-part series and covers fire protection equipment – both fixed and portable – as well as fire protection techniques. This course includes exercises and a test at the end of each section.

At the conclusion of this course, you will be able to:

• Describe the operation of several different fixed fire protection systems
• Identify the proper type of portable fire extinguisher to use on a fire
• Describe the operation of several different types of fire extinguishers
• Explain how to defend yourself and others in a fire situation
• Describe how to safely evacuate a burning building

2 Fundamental English
Safety: Working with Chemicals This 3-hour interactive online course deals with the safe use of chemicals in the workplace. The two primary causes of chemical accidents are the misuse of chemicals and the improper disposal of chemical wastes. Understanding the hazards that chemicals can create is the first step in protecting yourself (and those around you) from harm.

The main goal of this course is to provide you with sound, practical knowledge about chemical use and disposal, both in the workplace and at home. You'll learn how to recognize common chemical hazards and how to deal with them. You'll learn how to perform a job analysis to look for potential chemical dangers in your daily tasks. Finally, you'll learn how to take precautions to avoid chemical accidents and make your job as safe as possible.

At the completion of this course, you'll be able to

• Recognize the six different ways in which a chemical can cause you physical injury
• Name the routes or paths of entry by which chemicals can enter the body
• Describe the basic types of injuries caused by chemicals
• Identify potential chemical dangers in your workplace
• Describe how to identify, store, and label hazardous chemicals
• List several methods used to prevent chemical accidents
• Explain why proper training is important to chemical handling
• Describe the types of personal protective equipment used and worn when handling chemicals
• Explain the role of governmental agencies in enforcing chemical regulations

3 Intermediate English
Análise de perigo do arco elétrico (Arc Flash Hazard Analysis – The Basics) A eletricidade se desloca na velocidade da luz, a incríveis 300 mil metros por segundo. Isso certamente é mais rápido do que qualquer humano pode reagir em situações elétricas perigosas. O aumento exponencial de calor de uma falha de arco pode causar uma explosão em fração de segundos, deixando destruição e morte. Os funcionários frequentemente expostos a equipamentos elétricos conectados precisam compreender o que é um arco elétrico, como ocorre e como pode ser evitado. Realizar uma Análise de perigo do arco elétrico pode ajudar a prevenir a possibilidade de falha de arco e garantir que os funcionários estejam usando os equipamentos de proteção pessoal adequados para protegê-los no caso de um arco elétrico.  Entender o perigo e como evitá-lo é questão de vida ou morte.    

A primeira parte deste curso online interativo de uma hora será para discutir as causas e os perigos de um arco elétrico, o histórico da análise de perigo do arco elétrico e os órgãos diretivos para prevenção do arco elétrico. A próxima parte da seção abrangerá os componentes da análise de perigo do arco elétrico e como a análise é usada para a implementação dos padrões de segurança da OSHA ao determinar as distâncias de trabalho, a escolha do equipamento de proteção pessoal e os funcionários treinados. Por último, o curso abrangerá a prevenção do perigo de arco – como os avanços na tecnologia estão permitindo que os funcionários realizem manutenção remota no equipamento e como novos dispositivos podem prevenir os arcos antes que eles ocorram.

Ao final deste curso, você estará apto a:
• Discutir as causas e os perigos de um arco elétrico 
• Relatar o histórico da análise de perigo do arco elétrico 
• Reconhecer os órgãos diretivos para prevenção do arco elétrico e padronização de segurança 
• Listar as variáveis que são calculadas na análise de perigo do arco elétrico 
• Descrever como a segurança contra perigos do arco elétrico é implementada com base em cálculos 
• Compreender o treinamento de segurança dos perigos de arco elétrico 
• Definir técnicas e tecnologia para prevenção de perigos do arco elétrico
1 Fundamental Brazilian Portuguese
8-Hour HAZWOPER Refresher (No card) This series of courses meets the 8-hour OSHA HAZWOPER annual refresher training requirement for workers at hazardous waste sites. While this set of courses is designed to meet OSHA's HAZWOPER annual refresher requirements, your employer must provide any other site-specific and job-specific training deemed necessary. This set of courses does NOT cover:
Incident Review Requirements – To meet OSHA's HAZWOPER incident review requirement, your employer must provide incident review training and any other site-specific and job-specific training deemed necessary by your employer.
Hands-On Training – Your employer is expected to provide hands-on training, have a qualified trainer available for questions, and determine what additional training is needed to satisfy your training program requirements.

• RVCT-1016          overview
• RVCT-1008          HAZWOPER Chemical Protective Clothing
• RVCT-1009          HAZWOPER Chemical Protective Clothing Selection
• RVCT-1010          HAZWOPER Confined Spaces
• RVCT-1011          HAZWOPER Decontamination
• RVCT-1012          HAZWOPER Emergency Response Plan
• RVCT-1057          HAZWOPER ERG Introduction
• RVCT-1013          HAZWOPER Hazmat Physical Properties
• RVCT-1014          HAZWOPER Incident Command System
• RVCT-1017          HAZWOPER Ionizing Radiation Safety
• RVCT-1015          HAZWOPER Medical Surveillance
• RVCT-1007          HAZWOPER Air Monitoring
• RVCT-1021          HAZWOPER Release Mitigation
• RVCT-1018          HAZWOPER Respirators
• RVCT-1019          HAZWOPER Risk Assessment
• RVCT-1020          HAZWOPER Safety and Health Program
• RVCT-1002          HAZWOPER Site Control
• RVCT-1022          HAZWOPER Toxicology

8 Intermediate English
Respirators – Voluntary Use A respirator is a piece of personal protective equipment (PPE) that protects its user from inhaling hazardous substances in the form of dusts, mists, fumes, gases, or vapors. There are many different types of respirators; each type protects its user from a specific airborne hazard. “Voluntary use” situations occur when workers use respirators even when they are not required. When employers allow the "voluntary use" of respirators, there are several requirements they must fulfill.
 
[course outline]
 
Respirator Purpose and Use "Voluntary Use" Voluntary Dust Mask Use Appendix D Requirements Dust Mask Design Dust Mask Ratings Other Respirator Types Respirator Costs
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.134(c)(2)
• Define the terms "respirator" and "voluntary use" • Identify examples of voluntary respirator use • List employer responsibilities for the voluntary use of filtering face pieces, or "dust masks" • List employer responsibilities for the voluntary use of other types of respirators • Identify the costs related to voluntary respirator use for which employers are responsible 0.25 Intermediate English
Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) The Workplace Hazardous Material Information System (WHMIS) is a hazard communication system that ensures Canadian workers are provided with sufficient information to understand the hazards of the chemicals they may be exposed to in their workplace. WHMIS requires employers to communicate hazard information by labeling containers, providing safety data sheets, and training employees to recognize hazardous materials and how to protect themselves and their coworkers. This course provides an overview of WHMIS requirements.
 
[course outline]
 
WHMIS Hazard Classification Health Hazard Classes Physical Hazard Classes Hazard Categories WHMIS Exclusions Supplier Labels Pictograms Workplace Labels Safety Data Sheets Safety Data Sheet Sections 1-5 Safety Data Sheet Sections 6-10 Safety Data Sheet Se
 
Regulations
 
WHMIS 2015
• Describe the purpose of WHMIS • Describe how chemical hazards are classified • Describe employer requirements under WHMIS • Identify and describe the health and physical hazards outlined by WHMIS • Identify chemical hazards from pictograms and statements on container labels • Describe your rights and responsibilities as an employee 0.5 Intermediate English
DOT Reasonable Suspicion Supervisor Training – Alcohol Transportation employees of DOT-regulated employers who perform tasks that have been defined as “safety-sensitive” are subject to drug and alcohol testing. This includes “reasonable suspicion” testing, which is required when a properly trained supervisor suspects that an employee is under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs based on the employee’s appearance, behavior, speech, or smell. Supervisors and company officials who may need to make a “reasonable suspicion” test determination are required to complete at least 1 hour of training on the signs and symptoms of alcohol misuse. This course describes the purpose of DOT testing regulations, defines “reasonable suspicion,” lists the signs and symptoms of alcohol use, and describes best practices for conducting reasonable suspicion interviews and alcohol testing.
 
[course outline]
 
Welcome Who is Subject to DOT Testing Purpose of Drug and Alcohol Testing Roles and Responsibilities Drug and Alcohol Policy Components DOT-Mandated Testing Types Reasonable Suspicion Testing Why Alcohol is Dangerous Alcohol Time and Concentration Limits
 
Regulations
 
49 CFR Part 40
State the purpose of U.S. DOT drug and alcohol testing regulations Describe who is subject to U.S. DOT drug and alcohol testing regulations Identify the components of a DOT-compliant Drug and Alcohol Policy Describe the six types of DOT-mandated drug and alcohol testing, including reasonable suspicion testing Define “reasonable suspicion” List the signs and symptoms of alcohol use that can be used to make a reasonable suspicion test determination Describe best practices for conducting reasonable suspicion interviews and alcohol testing List the consequences of a positive breath alcohol test result and refusal to test 1 Intermediate English
DOT Reasonable Suspicion Supervisor Training – Drugs Transportation employees of DOT-regulated employers who perform tasks that have been defined as “safety-sensitive” are subject to drug and alcohol testing. This includes “reasonable suspicion” testing, which is required when a properly trained supervisor suspects that an employee is under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs based on the employee’s appearance, behavior, speech, or smell. Supervisors and company officials who may need to make a “reasonable suspicion” test determination are required to complete at least 1 hour of training on the signs and symptoms of DOT-prohibited drug use. This course describes the five DOT-regulated drug classes, including their signs and symptoms of use, the types of observations that can be used for reasonable suspicion drug test determinations, and what happens during a reasonable suspicion interview, specimen collection, and drug testing.
 
[course outline]
 
Welcome Reasonable Suspicion Drug Testing RS Test Determination Requirements DOT-Specified Illegal Drug Classes Prescription Drugs Marijuana Appearance and Use Cocaine Appearance and Use Amphetamines Appearance and Use Opiates Appearance and Use PCP Appea
 
Regulations
 
49 CFR Part 40
Describe the five DOT-regulated drug classes, including their signs and symptoms of use Decide what types of observations can be used for reasonable suspicion drug test determinations Decide what types of observations cannot be used for reasonable suspicion test determinations but do warrant increased observation Describe what happens during a reasonable suspicion interview, specimen collection, and drug testing Describe the consequences of positive, negative, adulterated, and substituted drug test results 1 Intermediate English
Delivery Truck Maintenance Many businesses depend heavily on their fleet of vehicles. In some businesses, such as package or propane delivery, or taxis, the fleet really is the business. In other cases, such as trades like electricians and plumbers, the vehicle is somewhat secondary to the actual job being performed, but no less important. In order for businesses which rely on vehicles to thrive, those vehicles which make up the fleet need to be able to operate safely and properly as close to 100% of the time as possible. At the end of this course, you will be able to: 
• Describe the difference between “reactive maintenance” and “preventive maintenance”
• List the benefits of preventive truck maintenance
• Describe how preventive maintenance can save money
• List the major elements of preventive maintenance systems
• List the responsibilities of a driver in a preventive maintenance system
• List some safety related inspection items for a delivery truck
• List some scheduled mechanical maintenance items for a delivery truck
0.5 Intermediate English
DOT Alcohol and Drug Testing for Drivers Employees of DOT-regulated employers who perform or could perform tasks that have been defined as “safety-sensitive” are subject to drug and alcohol testing. This includes over 12 million workers employed as airline pilots, bus drivers, commercial truck drivers, crew members on cargo ships, train engineers, and many others. Employers are required to implement a Drug and Alcohol Program and provide clear explanations of company policies and DOT testing regulations. They must also employ a Designated Employee Representative (DER) to administer the program, receive test results, remove employees from safety-sensitive duties when required, and answer questions about the program and testing process.
 
[course outline]
 
Who is Subject to DOT Testing Purpose of Drug and Alcohol Testing Employer Responsibilities Drug and Alcohol Policy Components Effects of Alcohol and Drugs Alcohol Limits Alcohol Screening Test Alcohol Confirmation Test DOT Drug Tests Specimen Collection Drug Testing Refusal to Test DOT Testing Types Pre-Employment Testing Random Testing Reasonable Suspicion Testing Post-Accident Testing Return-to-Duty and Follow-Up Testing Substance Abuse Professionals Admission of Alcohol or Drug Use Changing Employers
 
[Regulations]
 
49 CFR Part 40
• State the purpose of DOT drug and alcohol testing regulations • Describe who is subject to DOT drug and alcohol testing regulations • Identify the components of a DOT-compliant Drug and Alcohol Policy • Discuss DOT alcohol limits and testing procedures • Discuss DOT drug specimen collection and testing procedures • Describe the qualifications for and consequences of a “refusal to test” • Describe the six different types of DOT-mandated drug and alcohol testing • Describe the roles of Designated Employee Representatives, Medical Review Officers, and Substance Abuse Professionals 0.75 Intermediate English
DOT CSA Awareness The FMCSA implemented the Compliance, Safety, and Accountability (CSA) program to improve the safety of commercial motor vehicles on public roadways. This program uses performance and compliance data from roadside inspections, State-reported CMV crash records, carrier safety investigations, and carrier DOT registrations to focus FMCSA resources on the carriers who pose the greatest safety risk. Through compliance, the CSA program allows carriers and drivers to rectify safety concerns before crashes, injuries, or fatalities occur.
 
[course outline]
 
CSA Purpose and Scope Safety Measurement System (SMS) CSA Interventions BASIC Measures and Scores BASIC Categories BASIC – Unsafe Driving BASIC – Crash Indicator BASIC – HOS Compliance BASIC – Vehicle Maintenance BASIC – Controlled Substances/Alcohol BASIC – HM Compliance BASIC – Driver Fitness Data Sources Roadside Inspection Data Safety Investigation Data Acute and Critical Violations CMV Crash Data Carrier Census Data BASIC Measures and Percentiles Intervention Thresholds Insurance/Other Indicator Intervention Prioritization CSA Interventions Driver PSP Records
 
[Regulations]
 
49 CFR: Parts 171-173, 177-180, 382-383, 391-393, 395-397
• State the purpose of the FMCSA’s Compliance, Safety, and Accountability (CSA) program • State the function of the CSA Safety Measurement System (SMS) • Describe the seven SMS Behavior Analysis and Safety Improvement Categories (BASICs) • Describe how motor carriers are prioritized for CSA Interventions • Describe Pre-employment Screening Program (PSP) records for CMV drivers 0.75 Intermediate English
DOT Hours of Service Compliance The goal of the FMCSA Hours of Service (HOS) regulations is to improve public safety by keeping fatigued commercial motor vehicle drivers off the roads. These regulations apply to motor carriers and CMV drivers who engage in interstate commerce, and they are designed to ensure that drivers have enough time off to get the rest they need on a daily and weekly basis. The HOS rules are necessary because people are not good at judging their own drowsiness. They have been revised several times as our understanding of fatigue improves.
 
[course outline]
 
Goal of HOS Regulations Interstate vs. Intrastate Commerce Carrier and Driver Responsibilities CMV Definition Driver Applicability Driver Duty Statuses Property Carrier HOS Rules Passenger Carrier HOS Rules HOS Recordkeeping Methods Logbook Requirements Out-of-Service Violations Limited Exceptions Short-Haul Exceptions Sleeper Berth Provisions Alaska and Hawaii Exceptions Driver Harassment and Coercion
 
[Regulations]
 
49 CFR Part 395
• State the goal of the FMCSA’s Hours-of-Service (HOS) regulations • State the definition of commercial motor vehicle • Identify CMV drivers who are exempt from HOS regulations • Describe the four possible duty statuses • Identify the responsibilities of CMV drivers and motor carriers • Describe the HOS rules for property-carrying and passenger-carrying CMV drivers • Describe the four acceptable HOS recording methods • Describe the information that is required on Records of Duty Statuses (RODS) • Describe common exceptions to the HOS rules 0.75 Intermediate English
DOT Hazmat – Security Requirements In 2010, the Pipeline & Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) published a rule modifying the security requirements for the commercial transportation of some hazardous materials. This rule requires shippers and carriers of certain types and quantities of hazardous materials to implement a Hazardous Materials Safety and Security Plan (a.k.a. “Security Plan”) and provide additional security training to employees. Among other things, they must ensure subject hazmat packages and containers are properly closed and secured, select routes that will minimize damage to or from hazardous materials, conduct background investigations on new employees, confirm the adequacy of carrier Security Plans, and integrate all aspects of the security rule into their normal business activities.
 
[course outline]
 
DOT Regulation of Hazardous Materials Hazardous Materials Regulations Application of HMR Hazmat Security Rule Security Rule Applicability Required Security Types Security Plan Components Personnel Security Unauthorized Access Route Security HMR Training Requirements In-Depth Security Training Training Frequency and Recordkeeping
 
[Regulations]
 
HMR Safety and Security Plans, 49 CFR § 172 Subpart I
• Provide the Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) definition for “hazardous material” and “large bulk quantity” • Identify which shipments are subject to the HMR • List the required elements of a Hazardous Materials Security Plan • Describe the three types of security that a Security Plan must address: personnel security, unauthorized access, and route security • Describe the recordkeeping requirements for Security Plan documents • Describe the general training and in-depth security training requirements for hazmat employees 0.5 Intermediate English
DOT Hazmat – Marking The packaging used to secure hazardous materials during transport typically contains markings and labels to indicate that it contains a hazardous material. The purpose of these markings and labels is to communicate the hazards and risks of the materials being transported to anyone who could be exposed to them. All markings must be legible and durable; clearly visible; written in English; printed on or affixed to the package surface or a label, tag, or sign; and placed away from other markings (such as advertising) that could substantially reduce their effectiveness. DOT marking requirements are detailed in Part 172, Subpart D of the HMR.
 
[course outline]
 
"Hazardous Material" Definition Hazardous Material Regulations (HMR) Hazmat Employee Responsibilities Marking and Labeling Requirements Packaging Requirements Bulk and Non-Bulk Packaging UN Standard Packaging UN POP Marks Other Packaging Markings Additional Packaging Requirements HMR Marking Requirements Non-Bulk Packaging Markings Other Non-Bulk Marking Requirements Bulk Packaging Markings Marine Pollutants in Bulk Packaging Bulk and Non-Bulk Packaging Markings Prohibited Markings ID Number Exceptions and Provisions Marine Pollutants Class 7 – Radioactive Materials Poisonous Materials Explosive Materials Infectious Substances Elevated Temperature Materials Portable Tanks Cargo Tanks Tank Cars and Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks Unodorized LPG in Tanks
 
[Regulations]
 
HMR Marking Requirements, 49 CFR § 172 Subpart D
• Define the terms “hazardous material,” “packaging,” “package,” “bulk packaging,” and “non-bulk packaging,” as defined in the Hazardous Material Regulations (HMR) • Identify the responsibilities of shippers, carriers, and drivers for hazardous material shipments • List general packaging requirements for hazardous materials • Identify UN POP marks, Box Maker’s Certificates, and “Glass – Handle with care,” “Keep dry,” and “Upright position” markings • Identify general, material-specific, and packaging-specific marking requirements for bulk and non-bulk packaging • Identify the DOT markings used to identify marine pollutants, radioactive materials, poisons, self-reactive materials and organic peroxides, explosives, regulated medical waste, and elevated temperature materials 0.75 Intermediate English
DOT Hazmat – Placarding The DOT requires marking, labeling, and placarding of hazardous materials being transported in commerce to, from, or within the U.S. The term “placarding” refers to the placement of large durable versions of hazard labels on transport vehicles, bulk packages, freight containers, unit load devices, and rail cars. The purpose of marking, labeling, and placarding is to communicate the potential dangers of hazardous materials. Placards are especially important to emergency responders, who use this information to initiate protective actions after an incident or accidental release.
 
[course outline]
 
"Hazardous Material" Definition Hazardous Material Regulations (HMR) Hazmat Employee Responsibilities Packaging Terms Marking, Labeling, and Placarding Prohibited Placards and Exceptions General Placarding Requirements Placarding Exceptions Placard Visibility and Display Placard Specifications Placarding Table 1 Placarding Table 2 DANGEROUS Placards Class 1 Placards Class 2 Placards Class 3 Placards Class 4 Placards Class 5 Placards Class 6 Placards Class 7 Placards Class 8 and 9 Placards Subsidiary Hazard Placards Placarding Provisions – Highway Placarding Provisions – Rail Freight Containers and Unit Load Devices Bulk Packaging Provisions
 
[Regulations]
 
HMR Placarding Requirements, 49 CFR § 172 Subpart F
• Define the terms “hazardous material,” “packaging,” “package,” “bulk” packaging, and “non-bulk” packaging, as defined in the Hazardous Material Regulations (HMR) • Identify the hazmat packaging employees who must comply with the HMR • Identify markings, labels, and placards on hazardous material shipments • Describe placards that are prohibited, including the exceptions that are allowed • Describe general placarding requirements for hazardous material shipments to, from, and within the U.S., including how to use the placarding tables in the HMR, and placarding provisions and exceptions 0.75 Intermediate English
DOT Hazmat – Labeling The packaging used to secure hazardous materials during transport typically contains markings and labels to indicate that it contains a hazardous material. The purpose of marking and labeling is to communicate the hazards and risks of the materials being transported to anyone who could potentially be exposed to them.“Labeling” refers to the placement of primary and, if applicable, subsidiary hazard labels on the outer package. DOT labeling requirements are contained in Part 172, Subpart E of the HMR.
 
[course outline]
 
Hazardous Material Definition Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) Hazmat Employee Responsibilities Packaging Terms Marking and Labeling Requirements Hazmat Labeling Requirements General Labeling Exceptions Additional Labeling Exceptions International Labels Label Specifications Label Placement Labeling Prohibitions Additional Labeling Requirements Class 7 Radioactive Material Labels Class 1 and 2 Material Labels Mixed and Consolidated Packaging Labels Authorized Label Modifications
 
[Regulations]
 
HMR Labeling Requirements, 49 CFR § 172 Subpart E
• Define the terms hazardous material, packaging, package, bulk packaging, non-bulk packaging, marking, and labeling • Identify who is responsible for non-compliant hazardous material shipments • Use the Hazardous Materials Table and HMR to determine the required hazard labels for a package • List the international labels that can be used in place of or in addition to DOT hazmat labels • List durability, size, color, and placement requirements for DOT labels • Identify non-compliant hazmat packages 0.75 Intermediate English
DOT Hazmat – General Awareness Regulations related to the transportation of hazardous materials are contained in Title 49 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). The Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) in Parts 171-180 of Title 49 regulate the transportation of hazardous materials in commerce by motor vehicle, rail car, aircraft, or waterborne vessel. The HMR include classification, labeling, packaging, handling, loading and unloading requirements, in addition to standards for hazmat training, incident reporting, hazard communication, and security.
 
[course outline]
 
DOT Regulation of Hazardous Materials Hazardous Materials Transportation Act Hazardous Materials Regulations Application of HMR HMR – Packaging Requirements HMR – Training Requirements HMR – Hazardous Materials Table HMT – Symbols HMT – Proper Shipping Names HMT – Hazard Class or Division HMT – Identification Numbers HMT – Packing Group HMT – Basic Description HMT – Label Codes HMT – Special Provisions HMT – Packaging Requirements HMT – Quantity Limitations and Stowage Locations HMT Appendix A – Hazardous Substances HMT Appendix A – Hazardous Wastes HMT Appendix B – Marine Pollutants HMT – Elevated Temperature Materials HMR – Enforcement HMR – Penalties for Violations
 
[Regulations]
 
Hazardous Materials Regulations, 49 CFR §§ 171-180 Hazardous Materials Table, 49 CFR § 172.101
• Provide U.S. DOT definitions for “hazardous material,” “hazmat employer” and “hazmat employee” • Identify the circumstances under which the U.S. DOT’s Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) apply • Describe the responsibilities of hazmat employees and persons who offer hazardous materials for shipment • Use the Hazardous Materials Table to generate a basic description for use on shipping documents • Explain how hazardous substances, marine pollutants, elevated temperature materials, and hazardous wastes are identified and regulated during shipping 0.75 Intermediate English
DOT Hazmat – Shipping Papers Shippers of hazardous materials – including hazardous wastes, hazardous substances, and marine pollutants – must prepare and certify shipping papers before offering these materials for commercial transportation to, from, or within the U.S. Shipping papers identify and classify the hazardous materials being shipped, and notify shippers and carriers of their hazards. They help define the protective measures necessary to protect employees, the public, and the environment, and can provide critical information to emergency response personnel.
 
[course outline]
 
"Hazardous Material" Definition Hazmat Employee Responsibilities Shipping Paper Requirements Emergency Response Number Shipping Paper Exceptions Proper Shipping Description Basic Description Quantity and Package Details Additional Information Shipping Papers – Highway Shipments Shipping Papers – Rail Shipments Shipping Papers – Water Shipments Shipping Papers – Air Shipments Additional N.O.S. Information Marine Pollutant Information Poisonous Material Information Elevated Temperature Materials Information Reactive Materials Information Shipper’s Certification Shipper’s Certification Exceptions Hazardous Waste Manifest
 
[Regulations]
 
Hazardous Materials Regulations, 49 CFR §§ 171-180 Shipping Paper Requirements, 49 CFR § 172.200-205
• Describe the shipping paper preparation and recordkeeping responsibilities of shippers, drivers, and carriers • Identify the requirements for the Emergency Response Telephone Number on shipping papers • Describe common exceptions for shipping paper requirements • Identify the required components of a Basic Description and Proper Shipping Description • List the additional information that is required for some hazardous material shipments • Identify the four types of shipper certifications • List the additional information that is included on the Uniform Hazardous Waste Manifest 0.75 Intermediate English
DOT Hazmat – Highway Carrier Loading and Unloading Requirements The Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) apply to the transportation of hazardous materials in commerce. This includes the movement of these materials, plus all associated loading, unloading, and storage activities. Part 177 of the HMR contains requirements related to the transportation of hazardous materials by private, common, and contract “for hire” motor carriers. These carriers must also comply with several other Parts of the HMR, and many requirements of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSR).
 
[course outline]
 
DOT Regulation of Hazardous Materials Hazardous Materials Regulations HMR Highway Carrier Requirements Shippers and Carriers FMCSR and Other Requirements Hazmat Driver Training Shipping Papers HMR Loading and Unloading Requirements General Hazmat Loading and Unloading Loading and Unloading Explosives Loading and Unloading Flammable Liquids Loading and Unloading Classes 4 and 5 Loading and Unloading Corrosive Materials Loading and Unloading Class 2 Gases Loading and Unloading Divisions 2.3 and 6.1 Loading and Unloading Radioactive Materials Contaminated Vehicles
 
[Regulations]
 
49 CFR, Subpart D, Part 177
• Define the terms "hazardous material," "exclusive use," and "sole use," according to the Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) • Describe when the HMR apply to highway hazardous materials shipments • Describe the shipping paper recordkeeping requirements for hazmat carriers • List general loading and unloading requirements for hazardous materials • List the loading and unloading requirements for hazardous materials in Classes 1-5, 7, and 8 and Divisions 2.3 and 6.1 0.5 Intermediate English
DOT Hazmat – Highway Carrier Segregation Requirements Certain hazardous materials must be separated from each other during transportation in a manner that prevents commingling if a package failure or leakage were to occur. The segregation requirements for highway hazmat shipments are contained in Section 177.848 of the HMR. These requirements apply only to the Hazard Classes and Divisions listed in the HMR’s Segregation Table and only if the materials are in packages that require labeling or placarding, a compartment within a cargo tank, or a portable tank loaded in a container or vehicle.
 
[course outline]
 
HMR Highway Carrier Requirements HMR Segregation Requirements Using the Segregation Table Explosives Compatibility Table Additional Explosives Segregation Reportable Incidents Incident Reporting Written Report Exceptions
 
[Regulations]
 
49 CFR, Subpart D, Part 177
• Use the Segregation Table in Section 177.848 of the Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to determine segregation requirements for commercial highway hazardous materials shipments • Use the Compatibility Table to determine the segregation requirements for commercial highway shipments of Class 1 Explosives • Determine when a transportation incident involving a hazardous material must be reported to the National Response Center (NRC) 0.5 Intermediate English
DOT Hazmat – Packaging The primary function of hazmat packaging is to ensure that hazardous materials remain intact and secure during transportation. All packagings must be designed to ensure that under normal conditions, the contents will not be released and the packaging effectiveness will be maintained as it experiences typical physical stresses, including shocks, vibrations, temperature extremes, and changes in humidity and pressure. The Hazardous Materials Table (HMT) in Section 172.101 of the HMR can be used to determine the non-bulk and bulk packaging requirements, and any conditions for packaging exceptions, for hazardous material shipments.
 
[course outline]
 
Hazardous Material Regulations International Dangerous Goods Regulations Hazmat Employee Responsibilities Introduction to Packaging Packaging Types Bulk and Non-Bulk Packaging Using the HMT Packaging Exceptions DOT Special Permits Authorized Packagings Special Provisions UN Standard Packaging UN POP Marks DOT Specification Packaging Packaging Example HMR Packaging Requirements General Packaging Requirements Reuse, Reconditioning, and Remanufacture Limited Quantity Shipments Limited Quantity Ground Shipments Limited Quantity Water Shipments Limited Quantity Air Shipments Excepted Quantities Consumer Commodities Additional Packaging Exceptions Damaged Packages and Leaked Materials
 
[Regulations]
 
HMR General Requirements for Shipments and Packagings, 49 CFR § 173
• Define the terms “hazardous material,” “dangerous goods,” “packaging,” “package,” “limited quantity,” “excepted quantity,” and “consumer commodity” • Describe “bulk,” “non-bulk,” “combination,” “composite,” “single,” “large,” and “salvage” packagings • Identify when the Hazardous Materials Regulations, IMDG Code, IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations, and UN Recommendations apply • Demonstrate how to determine packaging exceptions and authorized packagings, and how to apply Special Provisions • Describe the purpose and application of DOT Special Permits • Show how Packing Group performance levels in UN POP marks are applied • List general HMR packaging requirements and common exceptions • Identify where the requirements for limited quantity and excepted quantity shipments can be found 1 Intermediate English
Office Safety While we most often associate workplace injuries with construction, mining, manufacturing, and other manual labor jobs, injuries can occur even if you spend most of your workday sitting at a desk. Therefore, recognizing common hazards in an office environment and knowing how to reduce risks is vital to creating a safer workplace. This course discusses the common hazards in an office environment and how to reduce risks in order to help create a safer workplace. •List some of the most common hazards and injuries in offices •Identify measures to prevent slips, trips, and falls •List ergonomic risk factors associated with office work and describe how to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal discomfort •Describe proper lifting technique •Describe how to prevent office fires •Describe the purpose and content of an emergency action plan 0.25 Intermediate English
Order Picker Safety An order picker is a forklift with an operator platform that raises with the forks. This allows operators to pick, or retrieve, individual items instead of entire pallets stored on high shelves. Order pickers are specially designed to operate in narrow aisles, where there is often only a few inches of clearance on either side. There are several obvious hazards associated with working at heights in narrow aisles, including falls, tip-overs, and falling objects. This course discusses how to safely operate order pickers.
 
[Discussion Points]
 
Discuss the types and capabilities of order pickers used in your facility Demonstrate how to operate order pickers in your facility Discuss company-specific order picker safety policies
 
[Regulations]
 
29 CFR 1910.178 – Powered Industrial Trucks
• List hazards associated with order pickers • Identify order picker safety equipment • Describe how to safely operate an order picker • Describe how to prevent tip-overs • Describe how to inspect order pickers to ensure their safety 0.25 Intermediate English
Turret Truck Safety A turret truck, also known as a swing-reach truck, is a forklift with forks that can pivot 180 degrees and traverse across its entire width. This allows pallets to be stored and picked up at right angles to the turret truck. Also, unlike a standard forklift, the operator compartment raises with the forks. Turret trucks are specially designed to operate in narrow aisles, where there is very little clearance on either side. Because of these unique design features and operating conditions it is important to become familiar with their operation and safety guidelines prior to operating a turret truck. This module covers common hazards, turret truck safety equipment, and safe operating procedures.
 
[Discussion Points]
 
Discuss the types and capabilities of turret trucks used in your facility Demonstrate how to operate turret trucks in your facility Discuss company-specific turret truck safety policies
 
[Regulations]
 
29 CFR 1920.178 – Powered Industrial Trucks
• List hazards associated with turret trucks • Identify turret truck safety equipment • Describe how to safely operate a turret truck • Describe how to prevent tip-overs • Describe how to inspect turret trucks to ensure their safety 0.25 Intermediate English
Cell Phone Use in the Workplace Cell phones have become a standard part of everyday life. They allow us to call or text, find directions, take and share pictures, schedule our lives, deposit money, listen to music, and keep up with social media. While cell phones have many positive aspects, there is a time and place for their use. Using a cell phone improperly at your job site can pose dangers to you and your coworkers. This course will cover these dangers as well as best practices associated with cell phone use. At the end of this course, you will be able to: 
• Identify the dangers of improper cell phone use
• Describe common techniques for avoiding distraction
• Identify best practices for cell phone use
• Describe proper text message etiquette
0.5 Intermediate English
DOT Roadside Inspections Specially trained inspectors use procedures and criteria from the CVSA’s North American Standard Inspection Program to conduct roadside inspections of CMVs and CMV drivers in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. This program identifies the critical inspection items and unsafe conditions that can place vehicles or drivers Out-of-Service, and it ensures a uniform and reciprocal inspection and enforcement process in North America. This course details the roadside inspection process and eight inspection levels, lists the violations that can place a driver or vehicle Out-of-Service, and give some tips on avoiding and surviving inspections. • Describe the purpose of the CVSA North American Standard Inspection Program • Describe how the FMCSA works to improve safety for CMVs and CMV drivers • State the definition of commercial motor vehicle • Describe the documentation and recordkeeping r 0.25 Intermediate English
Hazard Perception – Hidden Hazards Hidden hazards are not easily identifiable. They are partially or completely hidden from your view, but still have the potential to develop into a risk. Because the hazard is partially or completely hidden, it is unlikely you will be able anticipate the risk far in advance. This course will identify examples of hidden hazards and best practices to reduce the risks of these hazards. • Define "hidden hazard" • Identify examples of hidden hazards • Describe best practices when scanning for hidden hazards • Identify defensive driving techniques that can reduce the risk of hidden hazards 0.25 Intermediate English
Backing Up Safely How often do you need to back up your vehicle? If you are like most drivers, you spend less time backing up than driving forward. However, backing up is one of the more risky maneuvers you do throughout the day, especially if it is in crowded parking lots or restricted spaces. This course will identify potential hazards for backing up and best practices for avoiding those hazards. • Describe why backing up is risky • Identify potential hazards to safely backing up • Identify the number one way to prevent crashes while backing up • Describe best practices to safely back up 0.25 Intermediate English
Preventing Sideswipe Collisions Have you ever noticed another vehicle drifting slowing across the lane line into your lane? Or perhaps your vehicle was the one unintentionally crossing the lane line into another lane? If so, you are not alone, this is a common sideswipe crash scenario. This course will identify potential hazards that may lead to sideswipe crashes and best practices for avoiding those hazards. • Describe the types of sideswipe crashes • Identify potential hazards that may lead to sideswipe crashes • Identify strategies to prevent another vehicle from sideswiping you • Identify strategies to prevent you from sideswiping another vehicle 0.25 Intermediate English
Preventing Intersection Collisions – Cross Traffic Intersections are one of the most dangerous locations on any roadway. You should pay particular attention to the cross traffic as you approach the intersection. Cross traffic includes all road users that are traveling on the intersecting road and may cross or enter your path. This course will identify common contributing factors to cross traffic intersection collisions and strategies to prevent intersection collisions due to cross traffic. • Define a cross traffic intersection collision • Describe common contributing factors to cross traffic intersection collisions • Identify strategies to prevent intersection collisions due to cross traffic 0.25 Intermediate English
Sharing the Road with Pedestrians and Cyclists Unless you are driving on an interstate, it is possible you will be sharing the road with other types of road users. For example, you may encounter pedestrians and bicyclists while driving in urban, suburban, or rural areas. These situations are dangerous because collisions between vehicles and cyclists or pedestrians often result in serious injuries or fatalities. This course will identify clues that cyclists and pedestrians may become hazards and strategies to prevent collisions with cyclists or pedestrians. • Describe why crashes occur between cars and cyclists or pedestrians • Identify clues that cyclists and pedestrians may become hazards • Identify strategies to prevent collisions with cyclists or pedestrians 0.25 Intermediate English
Preventing Loss of Control Crashes Have you ever unexpectedly lost control of your vehicle while driving? Perhaps you lost control of your vehicle in inclement weather. Maybe it was raining hard and you applied the brakes suddenly, or you crossed a bridge that was covered with ice. Or, maybe you lost control because you had to suddenly steer to avoid hitting another vehicle or object. If so, you are not alone. These are all common factors that lead to loss of control events. This course will identify common loss of control crashes and then discuss ways to reduce loss of control and how to regain control. • Identify common loss of control crashes • Identify strategies to reduce your risk of losing control of your vehicle • Identify clues for losing control of your vehicle • Describe ways to regain control of your vehicle if you do lose control 0.25 Intermediate English
Preventing Intersection Collisions – Rear-ends More than 25 percent of all car crashes are rear-end collisions. A rear-end crash occurs when the front of one vehicle comes into contact with the rear of another vehicle. This course will describe contributing factors to rear-end crashes and identify strategies to prevent rear-ending or being rear-ended by another vehicle. • Define a rear-end crash • Describe contributing factors to rear-end crashes • Identify strategies to prevent rear-end crashes • Identify strategies to prevent being rear-ended 0.25 Intermediate English
Dangers of Distracted Driving Driver distraction has become a serious problem, and unfortunately, seems to be increasing. Think about the last time you drove or rode in a car. Did you notice other distracted drivers? Or, were you distracted while driving? Even though most people know distracted driving is risky, they still become distracted while they drive. This course will describe why distracted driving is risky and identify strategies to reduce distracted driving. • Define distracted driving • Identify three types of distracted driving • Describe why distracted driving is risky • Identify strategies to reduce distracted driving 0.25 Intermediate English
Preventing Intersection Collisions – Turning Intersections are one of the most dangerous locations on the roadway. Research has shown that a large number of crashes every year occur in an intersection or are intersection-related. This course identifies intersection hazards and strategies to prevent crashes in intersections. • Define an intersection • Identify common types of intersections • Describe the most important strategy to preventing turning related crashes • Identify strategies to prevent T-intersection crashes • Describe how to safely navigate a roundabout 0.25 Intermediate English
Environmental Driving Hazards Although most driving occurs during the daytime hours with good visibility, there are instances where you may have to drive with limited visibility or in inclement weather. This course identifies common environmental hazards and strategies to prevent crashes related to environmental hazards. • Define common environmental hazards • Identify why environmental hazards may cause a crash • Identify strategies to prevent crashes related environmental hazards 0.25 Intermediate English
Speed and Space Management Speeding is one of the contributing factors in a large percentage of crashes. Not only does speeding above the posted speed limit increase your risk of being involved in a crash, it also increases the severity of the crash. High speed crashes are more likely to result in a fatality or injury compared to lower speed crashes. This course will identify why it is important to manage your speed and space around your vehicle and describe strategies for effective space management. • Define speed and space management • Identify why it is important to manage your speed and space around your vehicle • Describe strategies for effective space management 0.25 Intermediate English
Work Zone Driving Hazards Work zones or construction zones are some of the most risky locations on any road. In the United States, a crash occurs in a work zone every 5 to 6 minutes. These crashes result in dozens of serious injuries every day and multiple fatalities each week. This course will identify why work zones are hazardous and describe strategies to reduce your risk of a crash in a work zone. • Identify characteristics of a work zone • Identify why work zones are hazardous • Describe strategies to reduce your risk of a crash in a work zone 0.25 Intermediate English
Fatigue Management Fatigue in the workplace is a dangerous condition in which an individual may not make good decisions or react quickly enough. This course will describe situations or conditions that lead to fatigue, and how employers and employees can take steps to minimize the possible negative effects of fatigue.
 
[Discussion Points]
 
Discuss company policies and scheduling procedures and the employees’ role in preventing fatigue
At the end of this course, you will be able to: 
• Describe the dangers of fatigue
• Describe the characteristics of fatigue and list some common symptoms
• Define circadian rhythm and shift work disorder
• Describe the responsibilities of both employers and employees for preventing fatigue
• Describe the purpose of fatigue risk management systems
• Identify ways to minimize the risks of fatigue
0.25 Intermediate English
Environmental Awareness Maintaining a healthy environment is essential for a healthy life. We all need clean air to breathe, clean water to drink, and safe food to eat. You need to be aware of and understand how your job impacts the environment, so you can do your part to help protect it. This course discusses basic environmental regulations and how to be a good environmental steward. This course also talks about resource conservation, how to reduce and dispose of waste, and finally how to be prepared in the case of an environmental incident. •Define pollution •List and describe core principles of environmental stewardship •Describe some things that you can do to on a daily basis to be an environmental steward 0.25 Intermediate English
Mobile Elevating Work Platform (MEWP) Safety for Supervisors Mobile Elevating Work Platforms (MEWPs) can provide temporary elevated workspaces as an alternative to ladders or scaffolding. Due to the potential hazards of working at height, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and Canadian Standards Association (CSA) have developed standards related to MEWP design, construction, and use. This course covers the 2018 ANSI A92 and CSA B354 standards for supervisors of MEWP operators. It covers the latest MEWP Group and Type designations, and updated design, use, and training requirements.
 
ANSI/SAIA A92.20-2018, A92.22-2018, and A92.24-2018 CSA B354
At the end of this course, you will be able to: 
• Identify the main components of a mobile elevating work platform (MEWP)
• Describe ANSI A92 and CSA B354 Standard equipment design requirements for MEWPs
• Identify MEWP Groups and Types, as defined in ANSI A92 and CSA B354 Standards
• Identify the main hazards related to MEWP use
• List safe work practices for MEWPs
• List the required elements of a Safe Use Plan, including the site risk assessment and rescue plan
• Identify the required training for MEWP users, operators, occupants, and supervisors
• Describe the inspection and recordkeeping requirements for MEWPs
1 Intermediate English
Mobile Elevating Work Platform (MEWP) Safety Mobile Elevating Work Platforms (MEWPs) can provide temporary elevated workspaces as an alternative to ladders or scaffolding. Due to the potential hazards of working at height, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and Canadian Standards Association (CSA) have developed standards related to MEWP design, construction, and use. This course covers the 2018 ANSI A92 and CSA B354 standards for MEWP operators and occupants. It covers MEWP Group and Type designations, as well as MEWP design, use, and training requirements.
 
[course outline]
 
Equipment Overview MEWP Design Requirements MEWP Controls MEWP Groups MEWP Types Additional Terms Work Preparations MEWP Overturn Hazards MEWP Falling Hazards MEWP Collision Hazards MEWP Electrical Hazards MEWP Falling Object Hazards Safe Work Practices Safe Use Program Site Risk Assessment Risk Identification and Controls Rescue Plans MEWP Selection Operator Training Occupant Training Requirements Inspection Requirements Pre-start Inspections Recordkeeping Requirements
 
[Regulations]
 
ANSI/SAIA A92.20-2018, A92.22-2018, and A92.24-2018 CSA B354
• Identify the main components of a mobile elevating work platform (MEWP) • Describe ANSI A92 and CSA B354 Standard equipment design requirements for MEWPs • Identify MEWP Groups and Types, as defined in ANSI A92 and CSA B354 Standards • Identify the main hazards related to MEWP use • List safe work practices for MEWPs • List the required elements of a Safe Use Plan, including the site risk assessment and rescue plan • Identify the required training for MEWP operators and occupants • Describe the inspection and recordkeeping requirements for MEWPs 0.75 Intermediate English
Investigation of Failures This interactive online course identifies common causes of equipment failures and the steps involved with prioritizing the failure events and conducting failure investigations. The learner will be introduced to several investigative analysis tools used to forensically exam the failure and the importance of maintaining equipment histories. At the end of this course, you will be able to: 
• List common causes of equipment failures
• Describe investigative analysis tools
• Recall the importance of equipment histories
• Identify failure events
• List common steps to conduct a failure investigation
0.5 Intermediate English
Personal Accountability for Safety The goal is for every person to go home safe every day. To achieve this, we must all be personally accountable for safety. This module describes what it means to be accountable and how you can demonstrate personal accountability.
 
[course outline]
 
Introduction Accountability Worker Responsibilities Identifying Hazards Hazard Identification Procedure Common Hazards Hierarchy of Controls
• Define accountability • Describe what it means to be personally accountable for safety • Describe how to identify and control hazards in the workplace 0.25 Intermediate English
Bloodborne Pathogens Bloodborne pathogens are microorganisms such as viruses or bacteria that, if present in blood, can cause disease in humans. These pathogens can be transmitted from an infected person to a healthy person by contact with infected blood or other bodily fluids. There are a number of relatively simple actions which can be taken to drastically reduce the chance of exposure to bloodborne pathogens. Depending on the type of work being done, workplace practices and methods can be modified to minimize the chance of exposure. Proper personal protective equipment is an important component in preventing the transfer of bloodborne pathogens from an infected person to a healthy person.
 
[course outline]
 
Hepatitis B Hepatitis C HIV Transmission Workplace Risk Sharps Prevention Engineering Controls Administrative Controls Personal Protective Equipment Exposure
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.1030: Bloodborne Pathogens
• Define bloodborne pathogens • List common types of bloodborne pathogens • Describe how bloodborne pathogens are transmitted from one person to another • Describe techniques for transmission prevention • Describe what to do if exposed to a bloodborne pathogen 0.5 Intermediate English
Electrical Safety General Awareness Spark discussion with your team on effective ways to recognize, evaluate, and avoid electrical hazards. Topics covered include personal protective equipment related to electrical safety, OSHA requirements for working on equipment, and electrical injuries such as shocks, burns, electrocutions, and falls.
 
[course outline]
 
• Electrical shock and injuries • Electrical fires • Ground fault circuit interrupter • Recognizing electrical hazards • Evaluating electrical hazards • Controlling electrical hazard • Personal protective equipment (PPE) • Requirements for working
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.331-1910.335: Electrical
• Electrical hazards overview • Electrical injuries including shocks, burns, electrocutions and falls • Electrical fires • Ground fault circuit interrupters • Recognizing, evaluating, and controlling electrical hazards • Personal protective equipment • OSHA requirements for working on electrical equipment 0.25 Intermediate English
Ergonomics for Office Environments Every year, hundreds of thousands of workers are diagnosed with musculoskeletal disorders, or MSDs. Understanding how to recognize and reduce the stress on your body from your daily work environment will help greatly reduce the likelihood of developing an MSD. This course discusses MSD prevention techniques in office environments, examples of awkward postures and positions, proper lifting technique, workstation setup, work habits, and stretches. Following the tips and guidelines illustrated in this course will reduce your chances of suffering from an MSD and help you have a healthy, productive work experience.
 
[course outline]
 
Musculoskeletal Disorders Economic Effects of Musculoskeletal Disorders Risk Factors Awkward Postures and Positions Forceful Exertions Proper Lifting Technique Repetitive Motions MSDs Symptoms and Prevention Workstation Desks Chairs Computer Monitors Keyb
• Musculoskeletal disorders • Risk factors • Awkward postures and positions • Proper lifting technique • Symptoms and prevention of musculoskeletal disorders • Workstation design • Proper work habits 0.5 Intermediate English
DOT ERG Introduction The Department of Transportation’s Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG) was created to help firefighters, law enforcement officers, medical personnel, and other first responders quickly identify the hazards present at transportation emergencies involving hazardous materials in order to protect themselves and the public. The ERG contains indexed lists of hazardous materials, the general hazards each material presents, and recommended safety precautions for emergency incidents. It is used in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, and several South American countries.
 
[course outline]
 
Introduction Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG) Overview of the ERG Sections of the ERG Front White Section Yellow Section Blue Section Orange Section Green Section Back White Section
 
Regulations
 
U.S., Canada, and Mexico. 2016 Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG): U.S. DOT
• Explain the purpose of the U.S. DOT’s Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG) • Define the terms “hazardous material” and “initial response period” • Describe the purpose and contents of the six color-coded sections of the ERG 0.25 Intermediate English
Formaldehyde Awareness Breathe easy with a better understanding of working safely around Formaldehyde. This course provides information on the history and production of formaldehyde as well as its uses, sources, exposure regulations, the types of formaldehyde, and the effects of exposure to formaldehyde gas.
 
[course outline]
 
• History and production • Usage • Exposure • Effects • Exposure regulation • Exposure management • Engineering controls – substitution • Engineering controls – ventilation • Administrative controls – work schedules • Administrative controls – t
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.1048: Formaldehyde
Formaldehyde overview History, production, and uses of formaldehyde Sources and types of formaldehyde exposure Effects of formaldehyde exposure Regulation and prevention of formaldehyde exposure 0.25 Intermediate English
Clean Water Act Section 404 Permits The Clean Water Act (CWA) protects "waters of the United States" (WOTUS) by prohibiting the discharge of dredged or fill materials without a Section 404 permit. This training provides general guidance for which waters are considered WOTUS, and the requirements for obtaining a Section 404 permit.
 
[course outline]
 
Waters of the United States, Tributaries, Adjacent Waters Case-Specific Waters of the United States Significant Nexus Analysis Wetlands and Wetland Delineation Study Exempt Waters Section 404 Permit Exempt Activities Permit Types Compensatory Mitigation A
 
Regulations
 
Clean Water Act Section 404
Define the term “Waters of the United States” Describe the purpose of Clean Water Act Section 404 permits Describe the difference between General and Individual permits Describe the Section 404 permit application process Describe the requirements for discharging dredged and fill material in waters of the United States Identify and describe common practices to avoid impacts to wetlands, and other aquatic resources Describe the compensation options for unavoidable impacts 0.75 Intermediate English
Hydrogen Sulfide Awareness Sometimes what you can't smell can hurt you. Protect yourself and your team with this critical information that raises awareness of what Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) is and discusses exposure risks and effects, toxicity, ignition, detection, prevention, and evacuation.
 
[course outline]
 
• Description • Exposure and Toxicity • Ignition • Detection and prevention • Evacuation
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910 Subpart Z: Toxic and Hazardous Substances
• Description • Exposure and Toxicity • Ignition • Detection • Prevention • Evacuation 0.25 Intermediate English
Hand and Power Tools The power to recognize and avoid injury is right at your fingertips. This course includes information on hand tools and power tools, including electrical, pneumatic, hydraulic, liquid fuel, and powder-actuated power tools. Topics covered include general tool safety, maintenance, guards, best practices, and operating guidelines.
 
[course outline]
 
• Hand tools • Portable power tools • Electrical tools • Pneumatic tools • Liquid fuel tools • Powder-actuated tools • Abrasive wheel tools • Guards • Switches and controls • Maintenance • Power tool do’s • Power tool do not’s • Operating gui
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910 Subpart P: Hand and Portable Powered Tools and Other Hand-Held Equipment
• Hand tools • Power tools • Tool safety • Tool maintenance • Tool do’s and do not’s • Operating guidelines 0.25 Intermediate English
Lead Awareness Before you cut, grind, or burn through any painted surface at work or at home, better make sure you know what you're dealing with. Protect yourself and your team from unintentional lead exposure with this course that defines what lead is and provides information on its history and usage, reduction efforts, lead exposure, effects, detection and treatment, personal protective equipment (PPE), and prevention methods.
 
[course outline]
 
• Overview and description • History and usage • Lead reduction efforts • Exposure and Effects • Permissible Exposure Limits (PEL) • Level detection and treatment • Exposure prevention – substance elimination • Exposure prevention – engineering co
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.1025: Lead
• Description • History and usage • Exposure • Effects • Detection and treatment • Prevention 0.25 Intermediate English
Pedestrian Safety Basic training on safely walking in active work zones. Learn about blind spots, the importance of eye contact, and designated walkways. Covers pedestrian safety guidelines, mobile equipment guidelines, and forklift driver guidelines.
 
[course outline]
 
Overview of Pedestrian Safety in the Commercial Workplace Mobile Equipment Safety Guidelines Forklift Driver Safety Guidelines Pedestrian Safety Guidelines
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.178: Powered Industrial Trucks
•Describe safety guidelines for mobile equipment •Describe safety guidelines for forklift drivers •Describe safety guidelines for working around mobile equipment 0.25 Intermediate English
Radiation Safety The myths surrounding radiation exposure may be great for a Hollywood screenplay, but they won't help you work safely around radiation at your facility. Use this radiation safety course to learn about ionizing and non-ionizing radiation, gamma rays, isotope encapsulation, radiation-based sensor usage, radiation strength, and exposure minimization. We're sure you'll find our radiation course a valuable asset to your safety program!
 
[course outline]
 
• Non-ionizing and ionizing radiation • Gamma rays • Isotope enclosure • Level measurement • Thickness measurement • Radioactive source handling • Dosage definition and reference • Exposure minimization • Time and distance
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.97: Non-Ionizing Radiation 29 CFR 1910.1096: Ionizing Radiation
• Definition of radiation • Gamma rays • Isotope encapsulation • Sensor usage • Radiation strength • Minimizing exposure 0.25 Intermediate English
Hexavalent Chromium Protect yourself and your team from increased risk of cancer with our training designed to raise awareness about the dangers of hexavalent chromium exposure. Welders and other workers who handle or assemble electronic components may be at higher risk of exposure to this known human carcinogen. Learn what hexavalent chromium is, how it's formed, the health hazards it presents, and what personal protective equipment you can use to protect yourself. Our training will also give you a better understanding of OSHA permissible exposure limits, monitoring, record keeping, medical surveillance, and employee notification. You'll also learn about industry best practices related to engineering and administrative controls to protect workers from dangerous exposure to hexavalent chromium.
 
[course outline]
 
Chromium Exposure Health hazards Welding operations Increased exposure from welding processes Considerations for controlling welding fumes. Applicable standards o OSHA exposure levels o Initial exposure assessment and continued monitoring o Observation an
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.1026: Chromium VI (General Industry) 29 CFR 1926.1126: Chromium VI (Construction)
• What chromium and hexavalent chromium are • How hexavalent chromium is used in industry • The connection between welding and hexavalent chromium • Methods of exposure to hexavalent chromium • Health effects of exposure • OSHA regulatory standards for hexavalent chromium • Respiratory protection and other PPE • Safe work practices and welding considerations 0.5 Intermediate English
Combustible Dusts It's only DUST! What's the big deal? Under the right conditions, many types of industrial dust, including coal, paper, and wood dust, can ignite and produce a devastating explosion. With our Combustible Dusts course, you'll learn to identify the hazards of combustible dust by using the Dust Fire and Explosion Pentagon. You'll get a clear understanding of dust control and preventions measures as well as dust analysis and explosion risk reduction. Our course will also help identify additional risks and prevention techniques associated with primary and secondary dust explosions.
 
[course outline]
 
• Hazards and Definition • Dust Fire and Explosion Pentagon • Risk Reduction • Dust Controls • Ignition Controls • Facility Dust Analysis • Explosive Factors • Combustible Dust Explosion Effects • Secondary Explosions • Damage Control
 
Regulations
 
OSHA's "Status Report on Combustible Dust National Emphasis Program" OSHA's "Hazard Communication Guidance for Combustible Dusts."
• Combustible dust hazards • The Dust Fire and Explosion Pentagon • Explosion risk controls • Explosion damage controls • Effects of combustible dust explosions 0.25 Intermediate English
Forklift Safety Contains basic forklift operating procedures intended to increase safety and help prevent the most common forklift accidents. Provides information on the most common types of forklifts used in general industry and warehouse environments. Includes important information required by OSHA’s general industry standards (29 CFR 1910.178) as well as best practices on operating powered industrial trucks.
 
[course outline]
 
• Types of accidents • Rear wheel steering • Fuel and batteries • Hazardous atmospheres • Center of gravity • Stability triangle, Stability factors, Forklift instability • Load capacity and load center • Vehicle pre-inspection • Notice surroundin
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.178: Powered Industrial Trucks Recognized industry best practices Content contribution by Frederick "Rick" Heath: industry expert on material handling equipment, Principal of Heath & Associates
•Differentiate between handling a forklift and an average automobile (rear-wheel steering, weight) •Identify the most common forklift accidents •Describe steps for refueling •Describe steps for recharging batteries •Describe the center of gravity and stability triangle •Describe load capacity and load center •Describe forklift pre-operation inspections •Identify safety guidelines and best practices for forklift operation 0.5 Intermediate English
Hot Work Safety This course covers basic guidelines and best work practices for performing hot work safely. Before welding, cutting, or brazing metal or performing any work that could generate enough heat or sparks to start a fire, everyone involved should be properly trained on the fundamentals of hot work safety. Based on NFPA 51B and 29 CFR Subpart Q regarding welding, cutting, brazing, and other hot work, this course is intended to help workers recognize the potential hazards of hot work and avoid injuries and property damage by properly planning, preparing for, and performing hot work.
 
[course outline]
 
• Who’s responsible for hot work safety o Management o Permit issuer o Hot work operator o Fire watch • Look for alternatives first • Designated hot work areas • Permit-required hot work areas • Where not to perform hot work • Hot work permit • Ass
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR Subpart Q: Welding, Cutting, and Brazing NFPA 51B: Standard for Fire Prevention During Welding, Cutting, and Other Hot Work
• What hot work is • Who’s responsible for hot work safety • The roles of management, the permit issuer, the hot work operator, and the fire watch • When and where to perform hot work • Hot work permit requirements • Special hot work considerations • Hot work and contractors 0.5 Intermediate English
Safety Management: Hot Work Permit This course covers the use of hot work permits at general industry facilities. A hot work permit refers to an employer’s written authorization to perform hot work operations. There is no one standard for Hot Work Permits; different facilities will have different forms and different procedures. This course serves as an introduction to the common protocols in place at most workplaces that are meant to ensure safe conditions before hot work can begin.
 
[course outline]
 
• Permit issuer • Safety responsibilities • The 35-foot rule • Equipment requirements • PPE requirements • Elevated Hot Work • Material considerations • Posting the permit
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.146, Permit-Required Confined Spaces 29 CFR 1910.252: Welding, Cutting, and Brazing General industry best practices
• The worker roles involved in completing and approving the permit • The importance of the "35-foot rule" when planning hot work • Typical equipment and PPE requirements when performing hot work • The importance of knowing the material that hot work is being done on or near • The importance of posting the permit • A sample hot work permit • And other considerations 0.25 Intermediate English
Forklifts – Reducing Product Damage This course covers the common ways forklift operators cause product damage in a warehouse environment, and recommended practices for avoiding this damage. It is meant to be used as an introductory or refresher course for forklift operators.
 
[course outline]
 
Delivery Damage Pallet Damage Obstructed Vision Inadequate Fork Spread Inadequate Fork Depth Forks Too Deep Forks Not Level Load Stability Momentum Unstable Light Loads Improper Stacking Improper Placement on Racks Stabbing Raking Collisions Settled Boxes
 
Regulations
 
Industry Best Practices
•List common causes of damaged product due to forklift handling (19 causes explained and how to avoid) •Describe behaviors to reduce product damage from forklifts 0.25 Intermediate English
Machine Guarding This course covers the importance of having industrial machine hazards properly guarded and protected against. This course is aligned with OSHA General Industry standards and industry best practices. It is meant to be used as an introductory or refresher course for general industry workers who will be operating or working near industrial machinery.
 
[course outline]
 
• OSHA Regulations • Common Machine Hazards • Point of Operation • Causes of Machine Accidents • Machine Guard Requirements • Overview of Machine Guard Types • Barrier Guards: o Fixed, Interlocked, Adjustable, Self-Adjusting • Devices: o Presenc
 
Regulations
 
OSHA 29 CFR 1910 Subpart O: Machinery and Machine Guarding Industry best practices
•Summarize the main goal of OSHA's machine guarding regulations •Identify common machine hazards •Identify common behaviors that cause most machine accidents •Identify the requirements for machine guarding •Describe the three main categories of machine guarding •Identify examples of common machine guards •Describe best practices when working with machine guarding 0.5 Intermediate English
Safety and Health – Basic This course covers basic guidelines and best practices for safety in a variety of industrial workplaces. From identifying and avoiding common workplace hazards to housekeeping and incident reporting, this course provides the fundamental elements critical to establishing safe work habits for yourself and your team.
 
[course outline]
 
• The importance of safety • Safety is a team effort • Your safety • Your safety and management • The safety of others • When coworkers work unsafely • Hazards o Physical hazards, work hazards, performance and behavioral hazards o Examples of work
 
Regulations
 
Industry Best Practices Wide Range of OSHA safety standards
•The need for safety at the workplace •How safety is a team effort •Hazard definition and identification •Methods for managing hazards •Reporting, first aid, and emergency preparedness 0.25 Intermediate English
Safety and Health – Advanced This course covers more advanced guidelines and best practices for safety in a variety of industrial workplaces. With safety topics including working around mobile equipment, hazardous chemicals, and moving machine parts, this course provides advanced concepts critical to establishing safe work habits for yourself and your team.
 
[course outline]
 
Machines Tools Mobile Equipment Chemicals, HazCom, and SDS Chemical Labels Special Jobs and Training Ergonomics Machine Guarding E-Stops and Normal Stops When to Use an E-Stop Motion Disconnects Lockout/Tagout Personal Protective Equipment Clothing and Je
 
Regulations
 
Industry Best Practices Wide Range of OSHA safety standards
•Working safely with machines, tools, mobile equipment, special jobs, chemicals, and difficult work processes •Machine guarding, E-stops, motion disconnects, and lockout/tagout policies •Personal protective equipment, clothing, and jewelry 0.25 Intermediate English
Lead-Based Paint Safety This course covers basic guidelines and best practices for working safely around lead-based paint. Even though U.S. legislation passed in 1978 has dramatically limited the allowable lead levels in paint, lead-based paint is still present in many residential and commercial buildings. Based on OSHA standards set forth in 29-CFR 1910.1025 related to lead exposure in the workplace, this course is designed to help workers recognize and avoid the hazards associated with lead-based paint.
 
[course outline]
 
• Use of lead in paint • Lead reduction efforts • Lead poisoning effects • Lead poisoning effects on children • Exposure o Ingestion o Inhalation o Secondary sources • Reducing exposure • Lead-based paint detection • Workplace exposure levels • W
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.1025 Subpart Z – Toxic and Hazardous Substances – Lead
• Why lead has historically been used in paint • Dangers and health effects of lead-based paint • How to recognize and avoid the hazards associated with lead-based paint 0.5 Intermediate English
Hydraulic Fluid Safety This course covers basic guidelines and best practices for working safely around common hydraulic equipment. From bottle jacks to forklifts and shop equipment, this course provides important information on the principles of hydraulics and the hazards that hydraulic systems can present. Based on OSHA documents and industry experience, this course is designed to help workers understand how to recognize common hydraulic hazards and avoid serious injuries.
 
[course outline]
 
How Hydraulics Work Primary Hydraulic Hazards Pinhole Injections Crushing Injuries Proper Installation – Components Proper Installation – Procedures Normal Operation Safe Work Practices Inspection Intervals Inspection Preparations Inspection Procedures In
 
Regulations
 
Industry Best Practices
•Identify the major components of a hydraulic system •Describe how hydraulic systems work •Describe the hazards presented by hydraulic fluid •Describe guidelines for installation, normal operation, inspection, repair and replacement •List in order the steps that should be followed in the event that a coworker is sprayed with hydraulic fluid •List guidelines that should be followed in the event that a coworker receives a pinhole injection of hydraulic fluid 0.5 Intermediate English
Trenching and Excavation Safety This course covers safe work practices for excavation and trenching work. It is meant to be used as an introductory or refresher course for construction workers involved in digging or working in an excavation. It is based on OSHA Construction regulations and industry best practices.
 
[course outline]
 
• Competent Person • When Do Standards Apply? • Danger of Cave-ins • Soil Types • Water • Equipment and Vehicles • Vibration • Pre-Excavated Earth • Loose Soil • Spoil • Protective Systems o Sloping, Benching, Shielding, Shoring • Pressurized
 
Regulations
 
OSHA 29 CFR 1926 Subpart P: Excavations Industry Best Practices
•Common dangers associated with trenching and excavation work •Importance of the competent person •Importance of soil type in evaluating excavation and trenching hazards •Protective systems of sloping, shielding, and shoring 0.5 Intermediate English
Crane and Hoist Rigging Safety Definition of rigging and slings, importance of safe rigging, load considerations, types of slings, types of sling hitches, safe rigging practices, and commonly required personal protective equipment (PPE).
 
[course outline]
 
• Factors in safe rigging • Slings • Wire rope • Chains • Metal mesh • Synthetic slings • Types of hitches: Vertical hitches; Bridle hitch; Basket hitch; Choker hitch • Endless slings • Load weight • Sling load capacity charts • Sling angle •
 
Regulations
 
Based on: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.184: Materials Handling and Storage – Slings OSHA 29 CFR 1910.179: Materials Handling and Storage – Overhead and gantry cranes ASME B30 standards ‘Rigging’ – a book by James Headley of the Crane Institute of America
•Define and describe rigging and slings •State the importance of rigging to crane operations •Identify the different types of sling materials •Describe the different types of sling hitches •Identify guidelines for safe rigging including sling angle, load balancing •Describe inspection guidelines for wire rope, chains, and hooks •Identify guidelines for rigging storage 0.5 Intermediate English
Line Breaking Safety Line breaking is the intentional opening of a pipe, line, or duct that contains or has contained material capable of causing injury. OSHA requires that all members of a line breaking team understand the hazards related to the material and equipment involved. This course illustrates common hazards of line breaking and provides suggested preventative measures for this type of work. Based on general industry best practices and OSHA regulations, this course covers basic safe work procedures recommended by industry professionals when planning or working on a line break.
 
[course outline]
 
• Line Break Hazards • Overview of Line Break Procedure • Line Break Authorization and Job Plan • Lockout/Tagout and Preventing Accidental Release • Methods of Isolation: Blanking/Blinding and Double Block and Bleed • Importance of Visually Inspecti
 
Regulations
 
Based on: Industry Best Practices OSHA 29 CFR 1910.146 – Permit-required confined spaces
•The definition of a line break •The dangers of line breaks •The importance of making a line break plan •Safe work practices when performing line breaks •The importance of personal protective equipment 0.5 Intermediate English
Heat Stress Symptoms and Prevention Heat stress can take a number of different forms, including heat rash, heat cramps, heat syncope (fainting), heat exhaustion, and heat stroke. Each of these conditions has its own signs, symptoms, and treatments. This course will help you to recognize each condition, and to know which ones require simple corrective actions, like taking a break, and which ones may require a trip to the hospital.
 
[course outline]
 
Forms of Heat Stress Heat Rash Heat Cramps Heat Syncope (Fainting) Heat Exhaustion Symptoms Heat Exhaustion Treatment Determining the Risk of Heat Stress Heat Stress Monitoring Reducing Heat Stress Potential Ventilation Systems Air Cooling Systems Insulat
 
Regulations
 
Based on: • The General Duty Clause of the Occupational Safety and Health—Section 5(a)(1) • Materials from OSHA and state labor agencies on heat exposure • Current scientific and medical findings • Accepted best work practices for preventing heat exposure
•Identify the forms of heat stress •Define the symptoms for each form of heat stress •Describe how to determine the risk of heat stress •List methods to reduce the risk of heat stress •Describe treatments for persons showing symptoms of heat stress 0.25 Intermediate English
Safety Management: Industrial Hygiene Basics “Industrial hygiene” (or “occupational hygiene,” outside of the U.S.) is the discipline of evaluating and controlling workplace hazards in order to protect the health and well being of workers and the community. This involves monitoring of work environments, evaluating exposures to hazards, and employing controls to prevent or minimize exposures and their effects. This course describes the job responsibilities of an industrial hygienist, discusses common workplace hazards, and details measures that can be used to control these hazards.
 
[course outline]
 
Brief History of Industrial Hygiene Industrial Hygienists’ Responsibilities Workplace Hazards Airborne Contaminants Chemical Hazards Biological Hazards Physical Hazards Noise Hazards Ergonomic Hazards Worksite Analysis Hierarchy of Controls Engineering Co
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR §§ 1910.94-98: Occupational Health and Environmental Control 29 CFR §§ 1910.101-126: Hazardous Materials 29 CFR §§ 1910.132-138: Personal Protective Equipment 29 CFR §§ 1910.211-219: Machinery and Machine Guarding 29 CFR §§ 1910.241-244: Hand and P
Define the terms "industrial hygiene” and “ergonomics” Describe the responsibilities of an industrial hygienist List and describe common workplace hazards, including airborne contaminants, chemical hazards, biological hazards, and physical hazards, including noise hazards and ergonomic hazards Describe the different types of airborne contaminants Identify the components of a “worksite analysis,” including a comprehensive survey, change analysis, job hazard analysis, and regular inspections Identify and describe the components of the “Hierarchy of Controls” 0.5 Intermediate English
Driving Preparation Be prepared for any trip with our Driving Preparation training that provides the basics of vehicle maintenance and inspection as well as suggestions for planning your route. Our course also suggests some valuable emergency supplies that can help prevent a minor inconvenience from becoming a major problem, such as common tools, spare tire, jumper cables and more. In addition to saving time and other costs, proper driving preparation can ultimately save your life as well as the lives of other drivers, passengers, and pedestrians around you.
 
[course outline]
 
Vehicle Maintenance Vehicle Inspection Plan Before You Drive Emergency Supplies Secure Cargo Seat Belts Cell Phones
 
Regulations
 
Industry Best Practices
• Vehicle maintenance • Vehicle inspection • Planning • Emergency supplies • Securing cargo • Seat belts • Cell phones 0.25 Intermediate English
Alert Driving Understanding the importance of being an alert driver can mean the difference between life and death. Learn how to observe conditions around you, anticipate hazardous situations, and react to avoid hazards with our Alert Driving course. Our course discusses driving at safe speeds, the dangers of driving while impaired, and illustrates how to increase your reaction time by following the two-second rule. Alert driving is a fundamental element of safe, defensive driving techniques.
 
[course outline]
 
• Never drive while impaired • Avoid distractions • Scan the road • Things to look for • Increase reaction time • The two-second rule • Speed limit
 
Regulations
 
Industry Best Practices
• Driving while impaired • Avoiding distractions • Scanning the road • Things to look for • Increasing reaction time • The two-second rule 0.25 Intermediate English
Driving Hazard Recognition Safe drivers recognize potential hazards and stay out of harm's way. With our Driving Hazard Recognition course, you’ll learn techniques for negotiating intersections and blind spots as well as avoiding erratic drivers, pedestrians, animals, and parked vehicles. You’ll also learn about driving with limited visibility and in slippery conditions. Paying extra attention to common driving hazards can help ensure that your passengers and cargo return home safely.
 
[course outline]
 
• Intersections • Blind spots • Limited visibility – bad weather • Limited visibility – obstacles • Losing traction • Erratic drivers • Pedestrians, animals, parked vehicles
 
Regulations
 
Industry Best Practices
• Intersections • Blind spots • Limited visibility • Losing traction • Erratic drivers • Pedestrians, animals, parked vehicles 0.25 Intermediate English
Supported Scaffold Safety This course covers some of the more important OSHA requirements for supported scaffolds, as well as basic safe practices for working on or near these scaffolds. It is intended as an introductory or refresher course for construction and general industry workers who will be working on or near scaffold systems.
 
[course outline]
 
Scaffold Accidents and Height Hazards Competent Person Types of Supported Scaffold Site Conditions Scaffold Footing Electric Shock Hazards Free-standing Scaffolds Height Restrictions and Additional Supports Very Tall Scaffolds and Load Capacity Platform G
 
Regulations
 
OSHA 29 CFR 1926.451: Scaffold – General Requirements OSHA 29 CFR 1910.28: Safety Requirements for Scaffolding Industry Best Practices
•Dangers of supported scaffolds •Safe principles of supported scaffold assembly •Safe work practices on supported scaffolds •Fall protection devices •Important safety regulations 0.5 Intermediate English
Arc Flash Safety An arc flash is a release of energy that instantly superheats the air and any nearby components, causing an explosion. It’s a serious hazard when working on or near energized electrical equipment. OSHA requires that all employees understand the electrical hazards to which they are exposed. This course introduces the dangers of arc flash and presents common methods for preventing and protecting against those dangers, such as risk control hierarchy, safety boundaries, lockout/tagout, and PPE guidelines. It’s based primarily on the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 70E “Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace®,” which is the recognized industry resource in the United States for best electrical work practices.
 
[course outline]
 
NFPA Standards Electrical Shock vs. Arc Flash Dangers of an Arc Flash Low Voltage Arc Flash Non-Human Causes of Arc Flash Human Causes of Arc Flash Risk Assessment Procedure Implementing Risk Control Electrical Equipment Boundaries Arc Flash PPE Categorie
 
Regulations
 
NFPA 70E® “Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace” Industry best practices
• Define "arc flash" • List the dangers of an arc flash • Identify common factors that increase the likelihood of an arc flash occurring • Describe risk assessment and control methods • Describe the basis for determining an arc flash boundary • Describe requirements for choosing the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) • List requirements for arc flash warning signs and labels • List common lockout/tagout procedures 0.5 Intermediate English
Mold Awareness and Prevention Mold is everywhere! Thousands of species of this type of fungus can be found growing year round, both indoors and outdoors, even in the most sterile of environments. Mold has a number of benefits, however it can also become a problem. Mold can destroy construction materials and also negatively impact people’s health. Knowing how to recognize mold, as well as how to clean it up and prevent it from recurring, is essential to a safe and healthy environment at work and at home.
 
[course outline]
 
•What Molds Are •Types of Mold •The Health Effects of Mold •What Mold Needs to Grow •Where Mold Grows •Cleaning Mold •Other Clean Up Tips •Mold Prevention
•The definition of mold •The types of mold •The health effects of mold •Where and why mold grows •Mold prevention •Mold cleaning tips 0.25 Intermediate English
Process Safety Management Process Safety Management is the identification, evaluation, and prevention of highly hazardous chemical releases that could occur as a result of catastrophic failures in processes, procedures, or equipment. This course covers the components of the OSHA regulation in detail.
 
[course outline]
 
• Why do we need PSM? • OSHA/EPA Regulations • Employee Participation • Training • Process Safety Information • Highly Hazardous Chemicals • Equipment and Technology in the Process •
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.119
•Define Process Safety Management of highly hazardous chemicals •State the need for process safety management •Identify key OSHA and EPA guidelines •Describe how to implement a PSM program •List the elements of a PSM program •List in order the steps for auditing a process involving HHCs 0.5 Intermediate English
Compressed Gas Cylinder Safety Prepare yourself and your team to work safely with and around compressed gas cylinders. This course describes compressed gas cylinders and how they are commonly used. Use this course to raise awareness about potential hazards and learn best practices for storage, transport, installation, and use of compressed gas cylinders. Missile hazards and types of compressed gases are also discussed.
 
[course outline]
 
• Physical Description • Potential Hazards • Physical Hazards • Missile Hazard • Chemical Hazards o Inert Gas o Flammable Gas o Toxic Gas • Best Practices o Storage o Transport o Installation o Use o Empties • Gas Welding Equipment
 
Regulations
 
Industry Best Practices
• Basic description of compressed gas cylinders • How compressed gas cylinders are used • Potential hazards of compressed gas cylinders • Best practices for storage, transport, and use of compressed gas cylinders 0.25 Intermediate English
Heat Stress Causes Heat stress is a serious concern in many workplaces. Every year heat stress affects thousands of people, and some die as a result. This course provides the information you’ll need to “beat the heat” and keep yourself and other workers safe. You’ll learn about the different types of heat stress, from the least severe (heat rash) to the most severe (heat stroke). It will explain how the body reacts to heat, and the causes of heat stress. Finally, it will list some factors that affect how individuals tolerate heat.
 
[course outline]
 
• Definition • How the body cools itself • Causes of Heat Stress o Temperature o Humidity o Heat index o Strenuous physical activity hot objects o Enclosed work areas • Factors that affect the ability to tolerate heat o Age o Weight o Physical fitness
 
Regulations
 
Based on: • The General Duty Clause of the Occupational Safety and Health—Section 5(a)(1) • Materials from OSHA and state labor agencies on heat exposure • Current scientific and medical findings • Accepted best work practices for preventing heat exposure
• Definition and types of heat stress • How temperature and humidity contribute to heat stress • How the body cools itself • Factors that affect the ability to tolerate heat 0.25 Intermediate English
Cold Stress People who are exposed to cold or wet conditions sometimes can't keep their body warm, which leads to cold stress. This course discusses the factors that increase cold stress as well as what frostbite, trench foot, and hypothermia are and how they are treated. This course also illustrates safe work practices to help with the prevention of cold stress.
 
[course outline]
 
The Cold Stress Equation and Wind Chill Personal Risk Factors Cold Stress Conditions Frostbite Three Stages of Frostbite Treating Frostbite Trench Foot Trench Foot Symptoms Treating Trench Foot Hypothermia Treating Hypothermia Prevention: Work Practices P
•Identify the three types of cold stress which are frostbite, trench foot, and hypothermia •Describe the primary causes of cold stress •Define the factors that affect how a person tolerates cold temperatures •Describe the signs, symptoms, and treatments for all three types of cold stress •List the methods to prevent cold stress 0.25 Intermediate English
Turpentine Awareness Turpentine, also called the spirit of turpentine, oil of turpentine, or wood turpentine, is a fluid obtained by distilling resin from pine trees and other coniferous trees. It is a colorless, volatile liquid with a strong odor. Turpentine is often used as a solvent or thinner for oil-based paints and varnishes. Working with or around turpentine is sometimes unavoidable, so it is critical that you use the proper PPE, follow standard procedures, and know how to handle leaks, spills, and other emergency situations. This course describes what turpentine is, its uses, the hazards it presents, and how to protect yourself from those hazards.
 
[course outline]
 
• Introduction to turpentine • Description of turpentine • Uses of turpentine • Flammability hazards • Exposure and toxicity limits • Health hazards and effects • PPE • Precautions fo
• Description of turpentine and its sources • Current and former uses for turpentine • PPE and handling requirements • Exposure and toxicity information • Potential health hazards and effects • Emergency response procedures 0.25 Intermediate English
Chlorine Dioxide Awareness This course will cover a description of chlorine dioxide, common uses of chlorine dioxide, PPE and handling requirements, exposure and toxicity, health hazards and effects, and emergency response procedures.
 
[course outline]
 
• Uses of Chlorine Dioxide • Reactivity and Flammability Hazards • Health Hazards • PPE • Precautions for Handling • Spill Prevention and Clean Up • Emergency Response for Exposure
•Describe the appearance of chlorine dioxide as a solid, liquid, and gas •Describe common uses of chlorine dioxide •Identify reactivity, flammability, and health hazards •Identify effects of exposure •Describe procedures for first aid •Describe handling precautions and PPE requirements •Describe guidelines for spill prevention and clean up 0.25 Intermediate English
Safety Management: Job Hazard Analysis This course provides basic guidelines for performing a job hazard analysis (JHA) in a variety of industrial workplaces. Based on industry best practices and OSHA guidelines, this course offers insights into why a JHA is a critical part of any safety program. From identifying common workplace hazards to accepted means of hazard control, this course provides the fundamental elements critical to establishing safe work habits for yourself and your team.
 
[course outline]
 
• Hazards • Job hazard analysis • Who performs the JHA • When to perform the JHA • Beginning the JHA: Identify the steps • Identify the hazards • Common hazards • Write hazard scenarios and sample scenario • Controlling hazards and control exampl
 
Regulations
 
OSHA Publication 3071: Job Hazard Analysis Safety and Health Program Management Guidelines: Issuance of Voluntary Guidelines
•The definition of a hazard •The definition of a job hazard analysis •The importance of the job hazard analysis process •How to perform a job hazard analysis •How to control hazards •When to review the job hazard analysis 0.5 Intermediate English
Flammable and Combustible Liquids This course provides important information on flammable and combustible liquids found in a variety of industrial workplaces. Based on OSHA standards, this course helps raise awareness of the potential hazards presented by common workplace products while offering practical instruction on labeling, storage, handling, and managing spills and waste to help establish safe work habits for yourself and your team.
 
[course outline]
 
• Flammable vs. Combustible • Classes of flammable and combustible liquids • Controlling hazards • Manufacturer’s labels and MSDSs • Identification of ignition sources • Storage cans • Storage cabinets and rooms • Additional storage requirements
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910, Subpart H: Hazardous Materials 29 CFR 1910.106: Flammable and Combustible Liquids NFPA 30: Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code
•Differentiate between a flammable liquid and combustible liquid •Identify different classes of flammable and combustible liquids based on their flash points •Identify the potential sources of ignition and describe how to control them •Identify different storage containers for flammable and combustible liquids •Describe fire control guidelines •Describe safe work practices around flammable and combustible liquids 0.5 Intermediate English
NFPA 70E Introduction NFPA 70E is the “Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace®.” It establishes safe practices for protecting workers from two major electrical dangers, electric shock and arc flash. This course provides an introduction to NFPA 70E and summarizes some of its important electrical safety guidelines, including information on safety program components, risk assessment, risk control hierarchy, safety boundaries and some requirements for electrical equipment and devices. It also introduces PPE categories and incident energy analysis methods for determining personal protective equipment requirements.
 
[course outline]
 
Electrical Dangers Electric Shock Arc Flash Electrical Safety Program Risk Assessment Procedure Qualified Persons Training Job Safety Planning and Job Briefing Lockout/Tagout Host and Contract Employers Shock Approach Boundaries Arc Flash Protection Bound
• Describe why NFPA 70E was created • Describe electric shock and arc flash • Describe typical main components of an employer Electrical Safety Program • Define "lockout/tagout" • Identify safety boundaries around electrical equipment • Describe requirements for choosing the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) • Describe some requirements for electrical equipment and devices, including: condition, maintenance, and labeling 0.5 Intermediate English
Hand Washing and Hygiene Each year in the U.S., food contamination leads to millions of illnesses and thousands of deaths. Salmonella poisoning, E. coli, Listeria, Hepatitis, and Norovirus can all be contracted by poor hand hygiene and can have potentially deadly consequences. Knowing proper hand hygiene techniques, the routes of hand contamination, the importance of the time spent washing the hands, and the difference between soaps and sanitizers will help keep you and your co-workers safe from the many foodborne illnesses that surround us.
 
[course outline]
 
Food Contaminants Routes of Hand Contamination Soaps and Sanitizers When to Use Soaps and Sanitizers Importance of Time Spent Washing Washing with Soap and Water Washing with Sanitizer Other Hand Hygiene Tips
•Dangers posed by foodborne illnesses •Role good hand hygiene plays in preventing illness •Difference between hand soap and hand sanitizer •Proper hand washing techniques •Other tips for good hand hygiene 0.25 Intermediate English
Back Injury Prevention If you work with heavy loads or repeatedly twist to move materials from one location to another, you may be at a greater risk of back injury. Back injuries are suffered by more than one million workers every year, account for twenty percent of all workplace injuries, and cost companies billions of dollars. This course will help prevent back injuries at your workplace by raising awareness about the common causes of acute and cumulative back injuries, signs and symptoms of back injuries, and the engineering and administrative controls that can be implemented to prevent back injuries.
 
[course outline]
 
The Spinal Column and Spinal Cord Functions of the Spine Effects of Back Injuries on the Spine Risk Factors Acute Back Injuries Acute Back Injuries: Common Causes Cumulative Back Injuries Cumulative Back Injuries: Common Causes Signs and Symptoms Preventi
•The need for back injury prevention •What the back and spine are •Common causes of back injuries •Risk factors •Signs and symptoms of back injuries •Prevention, including proper lifting technique 0.25 Intermediate English
Blocking and Cribbing for Heavy Equipment Blocking and cribbing is a phrase which describes a variety of procedures used to stabilize heavy equipment, or large components of heavy equipment, during maintenance. Blocking refers to any of a number of methods for securing a machine, or part of a machine, while it is being worked on. Cribbing refers to the technique of stacking a group of uniform blocks to create a temporary, but sturdy, elevated structure capable of supporting a heavy load. This course describes equipment and guidelines for successful blocking and cribbing operations.
 
[course outline]
 
Preparation Blocking Blocking Equipment Jack Stands Jack Stands Guidelines Cribbing Cribbing Applications Cribbing Materials Cribbing Block Guidelines Cribbing Construction – Prework Cribbing Construction – Stacking Cribbing Construction – Height Cribbing
Describe the purpose of blocking Describe cribbing Identify some of the blocking techniques used with heavy equipment Describe the materials used for cribbing Describe cribbing block care Describe some of the techniques used to build a successful crib 0.25 Intermediate English
Safety Showers and Eye Washes Chemicals are frequently used and stored in industrial environments. It is imperative to handle them with care and wear appropriate PPE to avoid exposure. If an accident does occur, however, safety showers and eye washes can be used to cleanse the affected area and decrease the extent of injury. Knowing use procedures, maintenance practices, and the locations of safety showers and eye washes will reduce the risk of serious injury and lead to safer conditions in the workplace.
 
[course outline]
 
Chemical Related Skin and Eye Injuries PPE and Chemical Safety Regulations and Requirements Locating a Safety Shower and Eye Wash Types of Safety Showers Safety Shower Operation and Technique Types of Eye Washes Eye Wash Operation and Technique Helping an
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.151 (c)
• Chemical related skin and eye injuries • Personal protective equipment and chemical safety • Types of safety showers and eye washes • How to operate and use safety showers and eye washes • Helping an accident victim use a safety shower or eye wash • Maintaining and testing safety showers and eye washes 0.5 Intermediate English
Tanker Rollover Approximately 1300 tanker truck rollovers occur every year. These rollovers are the reason behind one in four accident-related truck driver deaths. This course emphasizes the importance of drivers paying close attention to the road and its conditions, as well as how their behaviors and decisions can factor in a rollover.
 
[course outline]
 
What Happens during a Rollover? Four Risk Factors for Rollovers Driver Behavior Unsafe Behaviors: Excessive Speed Vehicle Design and Performance Impact of High Center of Gravity Load Effects Slosh and Surge Road and Weather Conditions Turns Vehicle Trippi
 
Regulations
 
Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) best practices
•Key statistics on tanker rollovers •How tanker rollovers occur •Common causes of tanker rollovers •Ways to prevent tanker rollovers 0.25 Intermediate English
Conveyor Safety Conveyors are involved in about 50 deaths in the U.S. every year. When used properly, conveyors can reduce workloads, make production more efficient, and prevent injuries that result from carrying materials manually. This course will discuss the most common types of conveyors and their hazards, the types of guarding around conveyors, general conveyor safety, and what to do during and after an emergency. Taking this course and understanding the hazards conveyors present will help keep you and your co-workers safe.
 
[course outline]
 
Types of Conveyors Hazards Guards Guarding by Location Pre-Operation Safety Start-Up Normal Stop Controls Emergency Stop Controls After Using an Emergency Stop Operation Safety Loading and Unloading Safety Pedestrian Traffic Housekeeping Inspections Maint
• Identify the most common types of conveyors • Describe the most common conveyor hazards • Describe the different ways to guard conveyors (mechanical, electrical, location) • Describe key startup and operation safety procedures • Differentiate between normal and emergency stop controls • List in order the steps that should be taken following the emergency stop of a conveyor • Describe guidelines for safely loading and unloading • List in order the steps for safely using a crossover • Describe how housekeeping, inspections, and maintenance support a safe workplace 0.5 Intermediate English
Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures When oil is spilled, it can endanger public health and the environment, as well as cost millions of dollars in clean up and disposal. To prevent oil contamination of navigable waterways and adjoining shorelines, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency created the Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure rule. Having a spill prevention plan in place is among the most effective and efficient tools in preventing environmental contamination. This course will discuss spill-related pollution, spill prevention techniques, appropriate procedures for controlling a spill in the event that one occurs, and countermeasure techniques that can be taken to help comply with federal regulations.
 
[course outline]
 
The SPCC Rule, Facilities Covered, and Oils Covered Common Storage and Handling Types Facility Diagram and Response Coordinator Location of the SPCC Plan Spill Prevention Measures Inspections, Tests, and Record Keeping Hazard Analysis and Substantial Harm
 
Regulations
 
40 CFR 112
•What the EPA's Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure rule is and why it was created •The key elements of an SPCC plan •Common storage and handling types •The role of the Facility Response Coordinator •Safe operating procedures •Control measures and countermeasures used to protect against and clean up after oil spills 0.5 Intermediate English
Trenching and Excavation Soil Properties This course covers the importance of soil properties and classifications when engaging in excavation work. It is meant to be used as an introductory or refresher course for construction workers who will be digging or working in excavations. It is based on OSHA excavation regulations and on recognized best practices.
 
[course outline]
 
Competent Person Danger of Cave-ins Signs of a Potential Cave-in Soil Types Soil Texture Soil Texture and Cave-in Risks Manual Testing Visual Soil Test
 
Regulations
 
OSHA 29 CFR 1926 Subpart P App A: Soil Classification Industry Best Practices
• Role of the competent person in excavation work • Dangers posed by soil cave-ins • Soil types • Soil textures • Types of soil tests 0.25 Intermediate English
Ergonomics for Industrial Environments Every year, hundreds of thousands of workers are diagnosed with musculoskeletal disorders, or MSDs. Understanding how to recognize and reduce the stress on your body from your daily work environment will help greatly reduce the likelihood of developing an MSD. This course discusses MSD prevention techniques in industrial environments, including engineering and administrative controls as well as motion-based, physical, environmental, and psychological risk factors associated with MSDs. Following the tips and guidelines illustrated in this course will reduce your chances of suffering from an MSD and help you have a healthy, productive work experience.
 
[course outline]
 
• Musculoskeletal Disorders • Economic Effects of Musculoskeletal Disorders • Risk Factors Overview • Motion-based Risk Factors • Awkward Postures and Positions • Forceful Exertions • Repetitive Motion • Duration • Contact Stress • Vibration •
 
Regulations
 
OSHA Ergonomic Guidelines
• Musculoskeletal disorders • Motion-based risk factors • Physical risk factors • Environmental risk factors • Psychological state risk factors • Musculoskeletal disorders prevention • Engineering and administrative controls • Proper lifting technique 0.5 Intermediate English
Overhead Crane Operational Safety The importance of the load capacity for an overhead crane and rigging; effect of sling angle; safe procedures for lifting, moving, and setting down a load; safe procedures for operating a crane near people; and importance of personal protective equipment.
 
[course outline]
 
• Primary concerns • Load capacity • Sling angle • Working near people • Lifting the load • Moving the load • Setting down a load • Overloading • Multiple person crews • Protective equipment
 
Regulations
 
OSHA 29 CFR 1910.179 – Overhead and Gantry Cranes American National Standards Institute (ANSI) best practices American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) best practices
•List the three things that must be verified before a lift •List the three things that factor into load capacity •Describe how the sling angle can affect rigging •Describe safe procedures for lifting, moving, and setting down a load •Describe guidelines for operating a crane near people •Describe guidelines for personal protective equipment when working around cranes 0.25 Intermediate English
Overhead Crane Basics Components and functions of overhead cranes, function of rigging and slings, and common pre-use safety inspections for cranes and rigging.
 
[course outline]
 
• Types of Industrial Cranes • Rigging and Slings • Controllers • Primary concerns • Inspection of work area • Visual safety inspection • Rope and chain inspection • Hook inspection • Inspection of crane movement • Inspection of warning devices
 
Regulations
 
OSHA 29 CFR 1910.179: Overhead and Gantry Cranes American National Standards Institute (ANSI) best practices American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) best practices
•Identify and describe the three main types of industrial cranes •Identify two types of controllers •List the three things that must be verified before a lift •Define and describe rigging and slings •Describe basic safety inspections for overhead industrial cranes, their components, and rigging •Describe guidelines for personal protective equipment when working around cranes 0.25 Intermediate English
Confined Space Entry – Permit Required A confined space is defined as a work area which has sufficient space for a person to fit within and perform work, limited means of entry and exit, and a design that was not intended for continuous worker occupancy. Working in a confined space can present hazardous atmospheres and physical dangers to employees. There are two types of confined spaces: Non-permit Required Confined Spaces and Permit-required Confined Spaces. This course will describe the dangers, best practices, and permit requirements necessary when working in a permit-required confined space.
 
[course outline]
 
Identification Confined Space Definition Non-permit Required Confined Space, Permit-Required Confined Space Signage Hazards Overview Entry Planning and Preparation Hazardous Atmospheres Overview: Oxygen Content, Oxygen Content, Flammable Gases and Vapors,
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.146: Permit-Required Confined Spaces
•Describe Non-Permit and Permit-Required confined spaces •Identify specific hazards that exist within confined spaces •Identify procedures used to minimize confined space hazards •Describe the job roles and responsibilities involved in confined space entry •Describe the required contents of a Confined Space Permit 0.5 Intermediate English
Lockout Tagout for Affected Employees Lockout/tagout can be defined as the placement of a lock or tag on an energy isolating device, in accordance with an established procedure, ensuring that the energy isolating device and the equipment being controlled cannot be re-energized until the locking device is removed. While an authorized person usually performs the lockout, an "affected employee" is an employee that is affected by the lockout. This course will focus on the general awareness needed for these "affected employees."
 
[course outline]
 
Defining Lockout/Tagout The Control of Hazardous Energy Energy Isolation Hazardous Energy Secondary Hazardous Energy Secondary Energy Sources Affected Employee Roles and Responsibilities Using a Lock Using a Tag Lockout Release
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.147: The Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout)
•Define lockout/tagout •Describe primary and secondary energy sources •Differentiate between an "authorized" and "affected" employee •Describe the lockout and tagout process •Describe the procedure for restarting affected equipment 0.25 Intermediate English
Wire Rope Basics Wire ropes are used on machines that lift and move heavy loads because they are strong, durable, and resistant to abrasion. They are commonly used in many industrial applications such as wire rope slings, derricks, cranes, hoists, and many more. In this course, you will learn about the basic construction of a wire rope as well as the different core types, strand materials, and rope finishes available for wire ropes. You will also learn the meaning of lay and about different lay types. This course ends with a description of the different construction types, wire rope design compromises, and a wire rope’s maximum working load.
 
[course outline]
 
Wire Rope Parts Core Types Strand Materials Wire Rope Finishes The Meaning of Lay Right Lay and Left Lay Regular and Lang Lay Alternate Lay Lay Length Rotation-Resistant Ropes Classifications Constructions Single Layer Construction Seale Construction Fill
Parts of a wire rope Wire rope materials Lay length Lay direction Classifications of wire rope Strand constructions Wire rope diameter, strength, design factor, and working loads 0.5 Intermediate English
Bloodborne Pathogens for Schools Bloodborne pathogens are microorganisms such as viruses or bacteria that, if present in blood, can cause disease in humans. These pathogens can be transmitted from an infected person to a healthy person by contact with infected blood or other bodily fluids. In an active school environment, younger children are going to get cuts and scrapes as they participate in physical activities. Older students are going to be involved in accidents, fighting, and even drug use. All of these activities present the risk to school staff members of exposure to blood and bloodborne pathogens. This course will cover some of the dangers to staff members posed by exposure to bloodborne pathogens, what precautions are needed to minimize the risk, and what procedures to follow if exposed to possibly infectious bodily fluids.
 
[course outline]
 
Introduction OSHA Standard Bloodborne Pathogens Hepatitis B Hepatitis C HIV Transmission Elevated Risk Personnel Exposure Precautions Contaminated Surfaces Sharps Proper Glove Removal Proper Handwashing HBV Vaccine Unprotected Exposure
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.1030 : Code of Federal Regulations
• Define bloodborne pathogens • List common types of bloodborne pathogens • Describe how bloodborne pathogens are transmitted from one person to another • List some requirements of the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard • Describe how to clean up infectious fluids • Describe the risks posed by sharps • Describe the proper technique for contaminated glove removal • Describe what to do if you are exposed to a bloodborne pathogen while unprotected 0.5 Intermediate English
Bloodborne Pathogens for Hospitality Bloodborne pathogens are microorganisms such as viruses or bacteria that, if present in blood, can cause disease in humans. These pathogens can be transmitted from an infected person to a healthy person by contact with infected blood or other bodily fluids. In the hospitality industry, which includes hotels and motels, employees may come into contact with blood or other possibly infectious bodily fluids. This can happen when cleaning rooms, stripping beds, and handling laundry. Given the risk of exposure to bloodborne pathogens, this course will cover how workers can recognize the dangers of possible infection, what precautions are needed to minimize the risk, and what procedures to follow if exposed to possibly infectious bodily fluids.
 
[course outline]
 
OSHA Standard Bloodborne Pathogens Hepatitis B Hepatitis C HIV Transmission Occupational Exposure General Guidelines Handling Linen Contaminated Surfaces Sharps Proper Glove Removal Proper Handwashing HBV Vaccine Unprotected Exposure
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.1030 – Code of Federal Regulations
• Define bloodborne pathogens • List common types of bloodborne pathogens • Describe how bloodborne pathogens are transmitted from one person to another • List some requirements of the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard • Describe how to clean up infectious fluids • Describe the risks posed by sharps • Describe the proper technique for contaminated glove removal • Describe what to do if you are exposed to a bloodborne pathogen while unprotected 0.5 Intermediate English
Wire Rope Safety and Operation Wire ropes are used on machines that lift and move heavy loads. Because of the potentially high loading on wire ropes, they can be one of the most dangerous pieces of equipment at a worksite. In this course, you will learn which personal protective equipment to wear while using wire ropes, safety guidelines for working with wire ropes, and how to recognize potential wire rope hazards. Because of the potential for accidents, knowing how to properly use and safely work around wire ropes is crucial to your safety and the safety of your co-workers.
 
[course outline]
 
Personal Protective Equipment Safety Guidelines Breaking in a Rope Maximum Working Load Importance of Wire Rope Inspections Recognizing Hazards
Safety guidelines Breaking in a wire rope Maximum working load The importance of wire rope inspections Recognizing wire rope hazards 0.25 Intermediate English
Hazard Communication GHS Many workplaces use hazardous chemicals. But, it’s not always easy to understand the various labeling requirements for these chemicals and the information provided to employees about the hazards these chemicals present. Concern and confusion about these issues increased when OSHA updated its Hazard Communication Standard in 2012 so “HazCom” would more closely align with the Globally Harmonized System (GHS). This course provides an overview of the key issues covered in the Hazard Communication Standard, including the 2012 revision to align with GHS, and provides the information that employees need to know about the labeling of hazardous chemicals in all parts of their product cycle.
 
[course outline]
 
• Hazardous Chemicals at work • The Hazard Communication 2012 standard • Industries covered, Labeling requirements • HazCom manufacturer requirements • GHS-Compliant shipping labels, Shipping label pictograms • DOT transportation labels, DOT pi
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.1200: Hazard Communication
•Identify the risks of being exposed to hazardous chemicals at the workplace •Describe OSHA's Hazard Communication Standard •Describe the written hazard control program •Identify the chemical labeling requirements and common label types •Describe safety data sheets, also called SDSs •Identify employee training requirements 0.5 Intermediate English
Equipment Hazard Basics Equipment in the workplace causes many incidents every year. Hazards exist where there is a risk of human contact with a machine's moving parts. Movement can occur at startup, during operation, or while a machine is stopping. Many incidents occur due to malfunctioning or missing machine guarding, or to workers taking shortcuts. It is important to know the types of hazards that equipment typically creates in order to avoid incidents. This course will cover common types of hazards associated with equipment, as well as how to identify and avoid these hazards.
 
[course outline]
 
Equipment Motions Equipment Actions Equipment Hazards Entanglement Hazards Nip Points Ingoing and Outgoing Nips Draw-in Hazards Impact Hazards Crushing Hazards Cutting and Puncturing Hazards Burn and Abrasion Hazards Electrical Hazards High Pressure Other
 
Regulations
 
OSHA 29 CFR 1910 Subpart O: Machinery and Machine Guarding Industry best practices
•Identify and describe common equipment motions and actions •List and describe common equipment hazards, including, entanglement, nip points, draw-in hazards, impact hazards, crushing hazards, cutting and puncturing hazards, burn and abrasion hazards, electrical hazards, and high-pressure hazards •Describe common causes of machine hazard incidents •Describe best practices for hazard identification and avoidance 0.25 Intermediate English
Heavy Equipment Safety Introduction Heavy construction equipment is extremely productive. The size and power of these machines however, presents a degree of risk to the men and women who operate and work around them. This course will cover the basics for remaining safe around heavy equipment as well as some specific concepts and guidelines for you to follow when working with and around heavy construction equipment.
 
[course outline]
 
PPE Introduction, PPE Mounting and Dismounting Walk Around Inspection, Walk Around Technique, Walk Around Checklist Seatbelts – Rollover, Seatbelts – Collision Visibility, Visibility Factors, Visibility – Operator Responsibility, Pedestrian Responsibility
•Describe the use of various types of personal protective equipment •Describe the correct method to mount and dismount a machine •Explain how to perform a walk around inspection •Describe why seatbelt use is important •Explain the difficulty of reduced visibility around heavy equipment •Describe how to move equipment in tight spaces and when to use a spotter •Explain the basic principles behind rigging a load to be lifted •Describe how you can protect yourself from falls when working on elevated surfaces •Explain the reason and techniques used to lockout and tag a piece of equipment prior to servicing •Describe how to block or crib a machine that is going to be worked on •Describe how to avoid injuring your back when lifting 0.75 Intermediate English
DOT HAZMAT Safety Over 4 billion tons of hazardous materials are transported in the U.S. every year. Due to their inherent risks to life, property, and the environment, the U.S. DOT established the Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to cover the classification, labeling, packaging, and handling of hazardous materials. They also regulate hazmat training, incident reporting, hazard communication, and security. This course describes existing regulations for the transport of hazardous materials in commerce in the U.S., including the Hazardous Materials Table (HMT).
 
[course outline]
 
DOT Regulation of Hazardous Materials Hazardous Materials Transportation Act of 1975 Hazardous Materials Regulations Application of HMR HMR – Packaging Requirements HMR – Training Requirements HMR – Hazardous Materials Table HMT – Symbols HMT – Proper Shi
 
Regulations
 
49 CFR 171-180 (2015): Hazardous Materials Regulations 49 CFR 172.101 (2015): Hazardous Materials Table
•Provide the U.S. Department of Transportation's (DOT) definitions for "hazardous material," "hazmat employer" and "hazmat employee" •Describe the key components of the U.S. DOT's Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) •Identify who must comply with the HMR •Use the information in the Hazardous Materials Table (HMT) from the HMR to correctly fill out the shipping description on a shipping document for a hazardous material •List the civil and criminal penalties that are possible for violations of the HMR 0.5 Intermediate English
First Aid – Sprains and Strains Sprains and strains aren’t the most serious injury a person can experience at work, but they are among the most common. This course explains what sprains and strains are, explains the RICE method for training sprains and strains, and gives tips on when a person with a strain or sprain should seek additional medical care.
 
[course outline]
 
Sprains and Strains Prevention RICE for Sprains and Strains Other First Aid Measures Crutches, Boots, Slings, and Splints Immediate Emergency Medical Care Additional Medical Care
• Explain what sprains and strains are • List some ways to prevent sprains and strains • List and describe the four steps of the RICE first aid method for a sprain and strain • List some reasons to get additional medical care for a sprain or strain 0.25 Intermediate English
Safety Management: OSHA Recordkeeping In the workplace, employees may be confronted with a variety of injury and illness cases. When these occur, employees will need to determine or help determine whether or not a case should be recorded on the OSHA 300 Log for their facility. Injury records are kept to help analyze injury causes, identify potential trends, and prevent future occurrences. Failure to properly record an injury or illness may also result in an OSHA violation and citation. Thus, it is extremely important to know and understand the OSHA rules and requirements for recording an injury or illness. This course will review the criteria for recording injuries and illnesses for OSHA purposes.
 
[course outline]
 
• Background • Purpose of OSHA Recordkeeping Standard • OSHA Recording Criteria • Definition of an Injury or Illness • Determination of Work-Relatedness • Definition of Work Environment; Definition of Pre-existing Condition; Definition of Signi
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1904
•Explain the background and purpose of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or OSHA, recordkeeping regulation •List the criteria used to determine what makes a case OSHA recordable •Describe what makes a case work-related or not •Differentiate between a new case and recurrence of an existing case •Describe OSHA's recordkeeping and reporting forms for injuries and illnesses (forms 301, 300, and 300A) 0.75 Intermediate English
Behavior-Based Safety Behavior-based safety, or BBS, is an approach to improving workplace safety by focusing on what workers do and why they do it, and then applying strategies to promote safe behaviors in the future. It is based on the belief that human behaviors contribute in some way to many or most accidents. BBS cannot comprise a safety program all by itself. Rather, it is a tool that can be used along with other tools to create an effective workplace safety program.
 
[course outline]
 
Why Is BBS Important? The Role Of BBS ABC Behavior Model Antecedents and Consequences Using Consequences to Reinforce Behaviors BBS Program Requirements BBS Program Implementation Examples of Safe Behaviors Examples of Unsafe Behaviors
Define the term “behavior-based safety" (BBS) Describe the three elements which contribute to workplace safety Describe the tools which must accompany a BBS program to create an effective workplace safety program Describe the ABC model of behavior, including when to use antecedents and consequences List the requirements of an effective BBS program Describe the steps required to implement a BBS program Identify examples of safe behaviors and unsafe behaviors 0.5 Intermediate English
Anhydrous Ammonia Awareness Anhydrous ammonia is a chemical compound composed of nitrogen and hydrogen that has been liquefied and compressed into a gas. It is used as fertilizer, in power plants, and as a refrigerant. This course describes what anhydrous ammonia is and how it is used in general industry. This course also discusses the permissible exposure limits of anhydrous ammonia, the personal protective equipment that should be worn when working with or around anhydrous ammonia, handling precautions, as well as emergency response procedures.
 
[course outline]
 
Introduction Description Uses of Anhydrous Ammonia Flammability Exposure to Toxicity PPE Precautions for Handling Spill and Leak Prevention and Clean Up Emergency Response for Exposure Fire-Fighting Procedures
•Describe the physical properties of anhydrous ammonia •Identify common uses of anhydrous ammonia •Describe health hazards and effects from exposure •Identify PPE for handling anhydrous ammonia •List safe handling requirements •Describe spill and leak containment procedures •Describe emergency response procedures for exposure and fire fighting 0.25 Intermediate English
Welding Safety Welding is a very effective workplace technique used to fuse or cut metal, though it is not without dangers. Knowing the hazards of welding and following the correct procedures will help prevent personal injury, fatalities, and property damage. This course will cover welding-specific personal protective equipment, arc and gas welding, brazing and soldering, as well as the hazards they present. Lastly, this course discusses safety procedures used to minimize the exposure to different welding hazards.
 
[course outline]
 
• Welding Safety • Eye and Face Protection • Ear Protection • Protective Clothing • Welding Gloves • Respiratory Protection • Arc Welding • Gas Welding • Brazing and Soldering • Metal Cutting • Fumes and Gases • Preventing Overexpos
•Describe the different welding-specific personal protective equipment •Describe why different filter plates are used •Differentiate between the different welding types •Identify and describe different welding hazards 0.5 Intermediate English
Steam Pipe Safety Steam is used around the world in many different ways. In industrial environments, it is commonly used for power generation and in heating and drying applications. When used properly, steam is one of the cleanest, most efficient, and safest forms of energy in use. However, employees should be prepared and aware of the hazards present when working around steam pipes in order to avoid accidents and injuries. This course describes the hazards presented by steam pipes, how to prevent them, as well as how to properly inspect, insulate, and label steam pipes.
 
[course outline]
 
•What is Steam? •Workplace Hazards •Health Hazards •Other Hazards •Proper Inspection •Steam Line Guarding and Insulation •Steam Pipe Labeling •Thermal Expansion and Contraction •Water Hammer •Working in Boiler Rooms and Economizer Spaces •Work
•How steam is created •Hazards presented by hot steam pipes and associated equipment •Inspection of steam pipes, steam condensate pipes, steam vent pipes, lagging and valves •Steam pipe and valve insulation •Steam pipe labeling •Lockout/tagout •Proper Personal Protective Equipment •Responding to medical emergencies 0.5 Intermediate English
Crystalline Silica Awareness Crystalline silica is a form of silicon dioxide which occurs naturally in the Earth's crust. When it is broken up by high energy activities into small airborne respirable particles, it can cause serious health hazards when inhaled. The symptoms caused by inhalation may not be immediately apparent. It is critical that individuals working around crystalline silica are knowledgeable of its physical properties, understand its safety risks, and know how to effectively avoid exposure. With the proper protective measures, training, and PPE, exposure to respirable crystalline silica can be reduced to the point that it is no longer a health threat to those who must work around it.
 
[course outline]
 
Sources of Crystalline Silica Silica Associated Industries Respirable Dust Creation Exposure Disease Risks Exposure Limits Prevention and Control Overview Engineering Controls Administrative Controls Medical Monitoring Respirators Personal Protective Equi
 
Regulations
 
OSHA CFR 29 Part 1910.1053
Identify materials which are capable of generating crystalline silica in the workplace List some industries associated with crystalline silica List the diseases caused by crystalline silica exposure Describe the effects of the diseases caused by exposure Describe how to avoid exposure to crystalline silica Differentiate between engineering controls and administrative controls Describe specific engineering and administrative controls for limiting exposure Identify appropriate personal protective equipment to help prevent exposure Describe the correct steps to take in case of an exposure emergency 0.5 Intermediate English
Heavy Equipment Visibility When operating heavy equipment, the driver's view is likely to be blocked in several directions. These "blind spots" can even obscure a person standing right next to the equipment. One wrong move and that person could be injured or even killed. But these incidents do not have to happen. This module will discuss how to safely operate and work around heavy equipment to avoid injuries. •Describe how to properly observe the worksite before beginning work •Describe the items that should be inspected before operating heavy equipment •Describe how to scan the worksite while driving heavy equipment •Identify the most common areas for blind spots •Describe safe practices for operating heavy equipment near people •Identify and describe tips for working near heavy equipment 0.25 Intermediate English
Maintenance Safety Industrial facilities rely heavily on complex equipment. To run efficiently and effectively, the equipment needs regular maintenance. However, performing maintenance can introduce many safety hazards. This course addresses best practices for safely maintaining and repairing equipment.
 
[course outline]
 
What is Maintenance? Maintenance Work Guidelines Typical Hazards Immobilizing Equipment, Lockout/Tagout, and Blocking Managing Keys Tool Transportation Maintaining and Repairing Vehicles Using Hand Tools Pry Bar Safety Hammer and Axe Safety Using Electric
•Define "maintenance" •Identify examples of equipment maintenance in a production facility •Identify and describe general maintenance guidelines for workers •Identify and describe typical hazards presented to maintenance workers •Describe three different methods to ensure the immobilization of equipment •Describe maintenance guidelines for vehicles •Describe safety guidelines for using hand tools such as pry bars, hammers, and axes •Describe safety guidelines for using power tools and cutting torches •Describe safety guidelines for welding, working on conveyors, and line breaking •Describe good housekeeping practices 0.5 Intermediate English
Lockout Tagout for Authorized Employees Don't count on luck, count on the lock. Protect yourself and your team from unintentional exposure to all types of hidden energy with this course that describes hazardous energy types and energy control procedures, including preparation, shutdown, isolation, lockout, stored energy check, verification, and release of lockout. Additional topics include lockout hardware and administration of an Energy Control Program (ECP). This course is intended for the "authorized employees" who typically perform lockout/tagout procedures.
 
[course outline]
 
The Hazardous Energy Problem The Hazardous Energy Solution Energy Isolation Hazardous Energy Secondary Hazardous Energy Secondary Hazardous Energy Sources Energy Control Procedures Preparation; Shutdown; Isolation; Lockout/Tagout; Stored Energy Check; Iso
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.147: The Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout)
•Define lockout/tagout •Describe why hazardous energy is a problem •Differentiate between an "authorized" and "affected" employee •List in order and describe the six steps of an effective energy control program •Describe lockout hardware •Describe the training requirements for lockout tagout •Describe the role of a primary authorized employee during a group lockout •Describe the procedure for restarting affected equipment 0.5 Intermediate English
Confined Space Entry Awareness A confined space is defined as a work area which has all of the following characteristics: sufficient space for a person to fit within and perform work, limited means of entry and exit, and a design that was not intended for continuous worker occupancy. This course will provide general awareness on confined spaces, differentiate between a permit-required and non-permit required confined space, and describe the job roles and responsibilities involved in confined space entry.
 
[course outline]
 
Confined Space Definition Non-permit Required Confined Space Permit-required Confined Space Signage Hazards Overview Atmospheric Hazards Physical Hazards Entrance and Exit Hazards Permits Permit Requirements Confined Space Entry Team Confined Space Attend
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.146: Permit-Required Confined Spaces
•Define "confined space" •Differentiate between Non-Permit and Permit-required Confined Spaces •Identify specific hazards that exist within confined spaces •Describe the job roles and responsibilities involved in confined space entry •Identify steps that should be followed to safely manage and eliminate hazards in a Permit-required Confined Space 0.5 Intermediate English
RCRA – Introduction The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) was passed by congress in 1976 to manage both hazardous and non-hazardous wastes to protect human health and the environment. RCRA subtitle C regulations apply to any company that generates, transports, treats, stores, or disposes of hazardous waste. This course covers hazardous waste identification, hazardous waste lists, codes, and characteristics, and the mixture rule.
 
[course outline]
 
Hazardous Waste Identification Solid Waste Listed Wastes Hazardous Waste Lists F List – Waste from Nonspecific Sources K List – Waste from Specific Sources P and U Lists – Unused chemical waste P and U List Hazard Identification Criteria Hazardous Waste C
• Describe the purpose of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) • Describe how to identify a hazardous waste • Differentiate between listed and characteristic hazardous wastes • Describe the four hazardous characteristics 0.5 Intermediate English
RCRA – Generator, Container, and Tank Requirements The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) was passed by congress in 1976 to manage hazardous wastes. RCRA regulations apply to any company that generates, transports, treats, stores, or disposes of hazardous waste. Generators (anyone that generates a hazardous waste) represent the first step in the management of hazardous waste. This course covers the classifications of generators and their regulatory requirements, waste minimization, container management requirements, hazardous waste tanks, and air emission standards and controls.
 
[course outline]
 
Generator Status Large and Small Quantity Generators Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generators Episodic Generators Satellite Accumulation Areas Waste Minimization Hazardous Waste Containers Container Management Requirements and Labeling Conta
 
Regulations
 
40 CFR 262 – Standards applicable to generators of hazardous waste
• Differentiate between the different classifications of hazardous waste generators • Describe the regulations for hazardous waste accumulation • Describe the requirements for tanks and containers used for storing hazardous waste • Explain air emission standards • Define volatile organic compounds 0.5 Intermediate English
RCRA – Preparing for Transportation, Manifesting, and LDR The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) was passed by congress in 1976 to manage hazardous wastes. RCRA regulations apply to any company that generates, transports, treats, stores, or disposes of hazardous waste. Generators (anyone that generates a hazardous waste) represent the first step in the management of hazardous waste. Once a generator has accumulated hazardous waste, it needs to be treated and disposed of. This often requires transporting the waste off-site to a treatment or disposal facility. A hazardous waste generator's responsibility is to correctly classify, package, and label the hazardous waste so it can be easily identified and appropriately handled by the transporter, and delivered to the treatment, storage, or disposal facility (TSDF). This course covers preparation steps for transportation, hazardous waste training requirements, hazardous waste manifest, land disposal restrictions (LDR), and alternative treatment standards.
 
[course outline]
 
Preparing for Transportation Markings Overview Non-Bulk Container Markings Labeling Placarding Hazardous Waste Training Requirements Hazardous Waste Manifest Manifest Instructions Manifest Copies Manifest Discrepancies Land Disposal Restriction LDR Prohib
 
Regulations
 
40 CFR 262 – Standards applicable to generators of hazardous waste 40 CFR 268 – Land Disposal Restrictions 49 CFR 105 – Hazardous materials program definitions and general procedures
• Describe the pre-transport requirements for hazardous waste generators • Explain how to mark and label hazardous waste containers • Describe the purpose and information included on a hazardous waste manifest • Identify and describe manifest discrepancies • Describe the goals of the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) and the LDR prohibitions • Describe LDR treatment standards 0.5 Intermediate English
RCRA – Emergencies, Inspections, and Training The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) was passed by congress in 1976 to manage hazardous wastes. RCRA regulations apply to any company that generates, transports, treats, stores, or disposes of hazardous waste. The goal of the emergency preparedness and prevention standards is to minimize the potential of a hazardous waste release and the resulting affects to human health and the environment. This course covers the required equipment needed for emergency preparedness, contingency plans, emergency procedures, inspection requirements, frequency, and logs, as well as personal training requirements and documentation.
 
[course outline]
 
Preparedness and Prevention Required Equipment Local Authority Arrangements Contingency Plan Contingency Plan Review Emergency Coordinator Emergency Procedures Inspection Requirements Inspection Frequency Inspection Log Personnel Training Perso
 
Regulations
 
40 CFR 264 – Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities
• List the requirements of the emergency preparedness and prevention standards • Describe a contingency plan • Describe the responsibilities of the emergency coordinator • Identify the items that should be included in a written inspection schedule • List the areas and equipment that must be inspected, and identify the required inspection frequency • List the items that should be on a typical inspection • List the information required to document personnel training 0.5 Intermediate English
RCRA – Special Wastes and Other Requirements The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) was passed by congress in 1976 to manage hazardous wastes. RCRA regulations apply to any company that generates, transports, treats, stores, or disposes of hazardous waste. Some hazardous wastes can be safely recycled. Recycling is an excellent way to manage hazardous waste if it can be done legitimately because recycling can avoid environmental hazards and protect natural resources. Most hazardous waste that is recycled is still subject to the full hazardous waste regulations, but some materials are exempt or subject to special regulations. Recycling facilities are not subject to hazardous waste regulations except when storing in containers or tanks prior to recycling. Recycled materials fall into a special category of waste. The regulations for recycling hazardous waste depend on the material and the recycling process.
 
[course outline]
 
Introduction – Waste Recycling Exempt Recyclable Hazardous Waste Special Recycling Standards Recycling Legitimacy Factors Determining Legitimacy Universal Waste Universal Waste Handlers Universal Waste Transporters Universal Waste Destination Facilities U
 
Regulations
 
40 CFR 261 – Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste 40 CFR 266 – Standards for the Management of Specific Hazardous Wastes and Specific types of Hazardous Waste Management Facilities 40 CFR 273 – Standards for Universal Waste Management 40 CFR 279
•Identify special wastes •Explain why some wastes are exempt from regulation •Describe special waste recycling standards •Identify the four categories of universal waste •Describe universal waste requirements •Define used oil •Describe used oil requirements •Describe the properties of asbestos and the requirements for asbestos disposal •Describe PCBs and their disposal regulations 0.5 Intermediate English
Truck Mounted Cranes Cranes are important pieces of equipment that are carefully designed and manufactured. When used properly, cranes provide a safe way to lift objects, and truck mounted cranes can be especially useful because they are mobile. However, cranes can pose many safety hazards. Cranes can tip over or contact electrical power lines. There is also the potential for moving or falling objects to strike workers, which is the leading cause of crane-related fatalities. Operators must be properly trained and everyone on the jobsite should be familiar with truck mounted crane safety. This course will describe common truck mounted crane types and components. The main focus of the module will be on the safe operation of truck mounted cranes.
 
[course outline]
 
Crane Types Crane Components Crane Controls Crane Lifting Principles Crane Capacity Load Charts Load Chart Capacity Information Crane Configuration Qualified v. Certified Lift Planning Electrical Power Line Hazard Outrigger Safety Stability Hazard Wind G
 
Regulations
 
ASME B30.5 – Mobile and Locomotive Cranes OSHA 29 CFR 1926 Subpart CC
•Identify common truck mounted crane types •Identify and describe the purpose of common truck mounted crane components •Describe crane lifting principles •Demonstrate how to interpret load charts •Describe the importance of lift planning and identifying possible site hazards •Explain crane operation safety guidelines •Demonstrate proper communication using voice and hand signals •Describe the purpose of crane inspections and the recommended frequency of inspections 0.5 Intermediate English
Working Over or Near Water Working over or near water can expose workers to a range of hazards, including injuries from falls, hypothermia, and drowning. This course discusses best practices for working over or near water, including the proper use of common types of personal flotation devices (PFDs). This course also offers information on what to do in “man overboard” (MOB) situations, including survival tactics and recovery practices.
 
[course outline]
 
Common Types of Work Work Hazards Before Beginning Work Common Types of PFDs Wear a PFD Best Practices Working Safely on Marine Vessels MOB / PIW Survival Factors Hypothermia MOB / PIW Recovery Practices MOB / PIW Survival Practices
 
Regulations
 
30 CFR Part 46.5.b.4
• Identify the main hazards of working over water, near water, and on marine vessels • Describe the five types of personal flotation devices (PFDs), including their uses • Identify safe work practices for working over water, near water, and on marine vessels • State the definition of "hypothermia" and list its symptoms and effects on the body • List survival factors, recovery practices, and survival methods in a "man overboard" situation 0.5 Intermediate English
Commercial Explosives Safety An explosion is a sudden, violent release of energy accompanied by the expansion of high-pressure gases. An explosive is any chemical compound, mixture, or device intended to create an explosion. This course discusses types of explosive materials and their UN (United Nations) hazard classifications. It reviews common explosion hazards as well as the recommended personal protective equipment. This course illustrates proper material handling, storage security, best practices for blasting operations, and explosives disposal.
 
[course outline]
 
Explosive Materials UN Hazard Classifications Commercial Explosives Common Hazards Recommended PPE Material Handling Storage Security Smoking Restrictions Drilling and Blasting Operations Best Practices for Blasting Operations Explosives Disposal
 
Regulations
 
30 CFR Part 46.5.b.4
• State the definition of an explosion and an explosive • List examples of explosives • List the United Nations' classifications of explosives • List common applications of commercial explosives • Describe common hazards of explosives • Describe common recommended PPE when handling explosives • List best practices for handling explosives • List best practices for explosive storage security • List best practices for blasting operations • Describe requirements for safe disposal of undetonated explosives 0.5 Intermediate English
Pneumatic Tool Safety Pneumatic tools are powered by compressed air. Common air-powered hand tools include jack hammers, chipping hammers, wrenches, grinders, and nail guns. Some of these tools shoot or create projectiles which can cause bodily injury. Additionally, pneumatic tools produce ear-damaging noise and release atomized oil and water vapor into the air. This module describes pneumatic tools hazards and how to deal with them.
 
[course outline]
 
Applications and Advantages Hearing Protection General Safety Precautions Compressed Air Cleaning with Compressed Air Air Hose Preparation Air Hose Use Air Hose Disconnection Hazard
•Define a "pneumatic tool" •List examples of pneumatic tool applications, and explain the advantages of pneumatic tools •Identify and describe safety hazards and precautions associated with the use of pneumatic tools •Identify and describe safety hazards and precautions associated with compressed air 0.25 Intermediate English
Electric Shock Electrical appliances and machinery are found in virtually every home and workplace. While they are common and convenient, they can also be quite dangerous. Thousands of people are shocked every year. An average of 60 people die each year from electric shock from small appliances, power tools, and lighting equipment. Knowing how to reduce the risk of electric shock, as well as how to respond should an injury occur, is essential for everyone.
 
[course outline]
 
The Risk of Electricity Electricity Basics The Role of AC and DC Voltage Types of Electrical Hazards Electrical Equipment Boundaries Safety Precautions Before Working Safety Precautions During Work Injuries Currents and Reactions Emergency Rescue Procedur
 
Regulations
 
NFPA 70E: Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace®
•Describe electricity basics •Define electric shock and other electrical hazards •Identify safety precautions when working with electricity •Identify variables affecting a person's injuries from an electric shock •Identify possible injuries and symptoms of electric shock •Describe emergency rescue and care for an electric shock victim 0.5 Intermediate English
Chemical Unloading Basics All personnel involved in bulk unloading of chemicals must be properly trained in general safety awareness, equipment function and emergency shut down, hazardous chemicals, personal protection measures, and security. This course will focus on some basic procedures and safety practices for unloading bulk liquid chemicals from tank trucks and railroad tank cars. Totes and drums will also be discussed. •List and describe typical personal protective equipment (PPE) guidelines for chemical unloading •Explain employee 'right to know' about the chemicals in the workplace •List basic safety and environmental considerations when unloading liquid chemicals •Identify and describe common equipment used during chemical unloading •Describe precautions that should be taken during vehicle arrival and preparation •List and describe the best practices for hose connection, unloading and hose disconnection •Describe precautions that should be taken during vehicle departure 0.25 Intermediate English
Warehouse and Loading Dock Safety Covers hazards and safety guidelines associated with warehouses and loading docks, including personal protective equipment (PPE), importance of housekeeping, mobile equipment, driving safety, fire extinguishers, and emergency procedures.
 
[course outline]
 
Loading Dock Area Safety Warehouse Areas and Equipment Common Hazard-Causing Behavior Personal Protective Equipment Lifting and Repetitive Motion Safety Fatigue and Dehydration Lockout/Tagout Pedestrian Safety Conveyor Safety Forklift Safety Truck Trailer
•Identify the purpose of a warehouse •Describe the typical equipment found in a warehouse •List and describe common hazard-causing behaviors •Match commonly required personal protective equipment (PPE) with the hazard they protect against and/or area where they must be used •Name in order basic lockout/tagout steps •Describe methods for keeping pedestrians safe •Describe steps or best practice behaviors to help you be prepared in case of an emergency •Identify and describe good housekeeping practices 0.5 Intermediate English
OSHA Electrical General Requirements The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has developed electrical safety requirements to protect employees from electrical hazards. The Electrical General Requirements standard (29 CFR 1910.303) is one of OSHA’s most frequently cited standards. Among these standards, this course covers requirements for listed and labeled equipment, proper use of flexible cords and cables, working space requirements, and effective electrical safety programs.
 
[course outline]
 
Examination Listed or Labeled Equipment Listing and Labeling Recognizing Noncompliant Products Extension cords Approved Appliance Use Custom Electrical Equipment Modified Electrical Equipment Working Space Working Space Examples Disconnect Switc
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.303
• Define approved electrical equipment • Describe the listing and labeling process for electric equipment including the role of nationally recognized testing laboratories • Describe the working space requirement • Describe the requirements for guarding electrical equipment • Define qualified person • Identify violations of the general requirements • Describe elements of an electrical safety program 0.5 Intermediate English
Aerial Work Platform Safety Aerial work platforms provide a temporary workspace as an alternative to ladders or scaffolding. They can be used to perform inspection, maintenance, or repairs. This course describes basic types of aerial work platforms and how to work with them safely. It provides an overview of safety requirements, controls, preparation, work rules, hazards, and other safety precautions related to elevated platforms. This course discusses vertical towers, articulating boom platforms, aerial ladders, and extensible boom platforms.
 
[course outline]
 
• Aerial Work Platform Types • Equipment Requirements • Controls • Preparation • Safe Work Practices • Hazards Overview • Overturning • Falling • Collisions • Electrical Shock • General Precautions
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.67: Vehicle-mounted elevating and rotating work platforms
•Identify aerial work platform types •Describe requirements for equipment and controls •List considerations that must be taken prior to operating an aerial work platform •List safe work practices •Recognize existing hazards of aerial work platforms 0.25 Intermediate English
Personal Protective Equipment Every day, someone decides to give up their sight, hearing, fingers, toes, or worse to save a few seconds of effort. Sure it can be inconvenient and uncomfortable, but using personal protective equipment (PPE) properly is better than many unfortunate alternatives. Use this course to educate yourself and your team on head protection, eye and face protection, hand protection, foot protection, respiratory protection, and hearing protection.
 
[course outline]
 
Wearing PPE Head Protection Type I and II Hard Hats Type II Hard Hats Hard Hats Additional Test Criteria Eye and Face Protection Eye Protection Eye Protection Classification Hand Protection Foot Protection Respiratory Protection Hearing Protection B
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.132: Personal Protective Equipment
•Identify various types of personal protective equipment •State the intended purpose for different types of personal protective equipment •Describe specific personal protective equipment required for certain work conditions and hazards •Identify appropriate personal protective equipment for a given environment or task •Differentiate between subclasses of a given type of personal protective equipment and define their limits of protection 0.5 Intermediate English
Hearing Conservation Protect one of your most valuable senses with a better understanding of the anatomy of the ear, how sound works, how the ear interprets sound, the effects of noise on hearing, and annual audiometric testing. Learn how to avoid occupational hearing loss by choosing and using the right hearing protection for your job, such as ear muffs and ear plugs.
 
[course outline]
 
Sound Description – Frequency, Amplitude, Duration Anatomy of the Ear How the Ear Interprets Sound Hearing Loss Noise Level Examples Managing Hazards Hearing Conservation Program Hearing Protection Noise Reduction Rating Estimating Noise Reduction Hearing
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.95: Occupational noise exposure
•Describe the properties of sound •Identify the anatomy of the ear •Describe how the ear interprets sound •Differentiate between types of noise and understand their impact on hearing •Describe hearing loss and how to prevent it •List the requirements of a hearing conservation program •Compare the advantages and disadvantages of ear muffs versus ear plugs •Identify noise hazards and select the appropriate hearing protection 0.5 Intermediate English
Fall Prevention and Protection – General Industry Working at elevated heights presents a serious danger of falling. Falls can be caused by inattentiveness, slippery surfaces, working in awkward or out-of-balance positions, or insufficient training. This course highlights numerous methods of prevention and protection, including fall arrest systems, the equipment associated with fall prevention and protection systems, vertical and horizontal lifelines, as well as inspection and maintenance guidelines. This course also discusses associated topics such as the proper procedure for putting on a body harness, lifeline swing hazards, calculating fall space clearance, and harness suspension syndrome.
 
[course outline]
 
• Primary Defenses Against Falls and Fall Prevention • Guardrails and Stairways, Work Platforms and Ladders • Fall Protection and Fall Arrest System Overview • Body Harness and Body Belt and Putting on a Body Harness • Lanyards, Types of Lanyards, an
 
Regulations
 
OSHA General Industry 29 CFR Part 1910 Subpart D – Walking-Working Surfaces
At the end of this course, you will be able to: 
• Identify and describe types of fall protection systems, including best practices for their use
• List, in order, the steps to put on a body harness
• Identify and describe different types of lanyards
• Describe different types of anchorage points
• Define "free-fall distance"
• Identify and describe vertical and horizontal lifelines
• List the calculation factors for determining fall space clearance
• List emergency action plan steps in case of a fall
• List inspecting and maintenance guidelines for fall protection systems
• List fall protection use guidelines in lift equipment
1 Intermediate English
Asbestos Awareness Dispel some of the common myths about asbestos by educating your team about Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM) and how to work safely around them. This course describes the most common types of asbestos as well as the hazards asbestos may present. It provides an overview of the history of asbestos use, exposure limits, detection, prevention, and regulation. It also covers some of the potential effects of long-term exposure including asbestosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma.
 
[course outline]
 
• Description • History • Common Uses • Asbestos Today • Forms of ACMs • Exposure Risks • Health Effects • Asbestosis • Lung Cancer • Mesothelioma • Detection • Exposure Regulation • Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) • Construction-specific R
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.1001: Asbestos
•Describe the physical properties of asbestos •State the historical and present uses of asbestos •Identify the asbestos exposure risks and understand the health effects •Recognize the various types of materials containing asbestos •Identify potential asbestos-containing materials in the workplace •Define safety measures to prevent exposure 0.5 Intermediate English
Laser Safety Lasers have become an integral part of society. Due to their ability to carry large amounts of data with little or no signal degradation over long distances, they are commonly used in fiber optic communication systems. Use this course to learn safe work practices around Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASERs). This course covers the theory of laser light, how lasers work, types of lasers, laser classifications, laser hazards, low-power laser hazards, and laser pointer safety guidelines.
 
[course outline]
 
• Laser Light • How Lasers Work • Types of Lasers • Laser Classifications • Class I Lasers • Class II Lasers • Class IIIa Lasers • Class IIIb Lasers • Class IV Lasers • Low Power Laser Hazards • Nominal Hazard Zone • Class IIIb and IV Laser En
 
Regulations
 
STD 01-05-001 – PUB 8-1.7: Guidelines for Laser Safety and Hazard Assessment
•Describe laser light •Describe how lasers work •Identify the different types of lasers •Differentiate between the different laser classifications •List different engineering and administrative controls •Differentiate between specular reflection and diffuse reflection •List laser hazards and safety guidelines 0.25 Intermediate English
Ladder Safety Ladders are tools commonly used to gain access to higher levels that are otherwise unreachable. When maintained properly and used according to safety guidelines, they are a simple and effective tool. However, each year thousands of workers are either injured or killed in ladder related accidents. This course describes different types of ladders, as well as ladder construction, ladder selection, height requirements, weight capacity, hazardous conditions, inspections, ladder setup, safe practices when using ladders, storage, and maintenance.
 
[course outline]
 
• General Ladder Construction • Types of Ladders • Ladder Selection • Height and Pitch Requirements • Calculating Height and Pitch – Approximation • Calculating Height and Pitch – Pythagorean Theorem • Weight Capacity • Portable Ladders •
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910 Subpart D: Walking-Working Surfaces
•State the general construction of ladders •Differentiate between the different types of ladders •Select a ladder appropriate for accessing a work area •Set up a correct ladder height and pitch •Identify equipment damage and proper ladder functionality •Define proper ladder storage and maintenance •Identify safe ladder setup locations on a worksite 0.5 Intermediate English
Load Securement The North American Cargo Securement Standard provides the basis for the rules and regulations covering load securement on motor vehicles in the United States and Canada. This standard was created because unsecured loads can cause loss of life and load, cargo and vehicle damage, and accidents with other vehicles. This course covers the purpose of load securement, preparing loads, methods of load securement (including tie-down assemblies), working load limits, tie-down types, and safety.
 
[course outline]
 
North American Cargo Securement Standard Purpose of Load Securement Methods of Load Securement Tie-down Assemblies Working Load Limit Definitions Tie-Down Types Number of Tie-Downs Safety Guidelines Safe Delivery Steps Preparing for Transport Loading Whee
 
Regulations
 
49 CFR 393.100
•Specify where and when the North American Cargo Securement Standard applies •List the three methods of load securement on a motor vehicle •Define working load limit (WLL) and aggregate working load limit (AWLL) •Describe how the number of tie-downs required for a load is determined •List safety guidelines related to cargo securement •Identify when vehicles and load securement devices should be inspected during transport •List commodities which have special load securement requirements 0.5 Intermediate English
Portable Loading Ramps Portable loading ramps, also called portable loading docks, forklift ramps, mobile ramps, or yard ramps, provide access to semi-trailers and boxcars from ground level. They can be used in places where permanent loading docks do not exist, such as farm fields or construction sites, or as a cost effective way to expand material handling capabilities. Portability provides the flexibility to load and unload trailers close to the storage location, which can significantly reduce transportation distances in large facilities. This course will cover the basic features and safe operating guidelines for portable loading ramps.
 
[course outline]
 
Aluminum vs. Steel Ramp Design Height Adjustment Ramp Capacity Ramp Length Ramp Width Ramp Positioning Pre-Use Safety Forklift Safety on Ramps Platforms
 
Regulations
 
OSHA 29 CFR 1910.176 – Material Handling OSHA 29 CFR 1910.178 – Forklift Safety
•Describe the purpose of portable loading ramps •Describe how to choose the correct ramp size •List the items required to ensure safe use of portable loading ramps •Describe how to safely drive a forklift on the ramp 0.25 Intermediate English
Driving Large Vehicles and Heavy Equipment Vehicles on public roadways come in many different shapes and sizes. Most passenger vehicles – cars, vans, SUVs, and pickup trucks – have similar configurations and controls, and drivers of these vehicles understand their capabilities and limitations. However, drivers of large trucks and heavy equipment must use extra caution in order to safely navigate and share the roads with smaller vehicles. This course covers some of the things that must be considered when driving large vehicles or operating heavy equipment in order to ensure the safety of operators and people who are nearby. Topics covered include blind spot awareness, how to safely back up, dealing with inclement weather and poor road conditions, construction and work zone considerations, and minimizing in-cab distractions.
 
[course outline]
 
Maintenance Blind Spots Backing Up Weather and Road Conditions Winter Driving Considerations Summer Driving Considerations Stopping Distances Construction and Work Zones In-Cab Distractions
•List the items you should check before starting up a large vehicle or piece of heavy equipment •List the additional limitations that large vehicles and heavy equipment have when compared to smaller vehicles •Identify the blind spots on a large semi-truck •Describe how you can safely back up a large truck or piece of heavy equipment •Describe how high winds, standing water, driving in rain or snow, potholes, and sun glare can be hazardous while driving •List the steps you should take if your vehicle begins to overheat or hydroplane •List the main reasons large vehicles have longer stopping distances •List rules that can help improve safety at construction zones and work zones 0.25 Intermediate English
OSHA Electrical Wiring Methods The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has developed electrical safety requirements to protect employees from hazards such as electric shock, electrocution, fires, and explosions. The Electrical Wiring Methods standard (29 CFR 1910.305) is one of OSHA’s most frequently cited standards. This standard covers wiring methods, components, and equipment for general use. This course will address some of the frequently cited requirements and provide some examples to help clarify the standard.
 
[course outline]
 
• Electrical Wire and Cable Terms • Wire, cable, or cord • Wiring Methods Standard Topics • Electrical Wiring Violations • Use of Flexible Cords and Cables • Prohibited Uses of Flexible Cords and Cables • Identification, Spices, and Terminations •
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.305
• Differentiate between wire, cable, and cord • Describe the correct and incorrect uses of flexible cords and cables • Identify acceptable temporary wiring • Identify some common violations • Describe elements of an electrical safety program 0.5 Intermediate English
Stormwater Pollution Prevention Stormwater runoff is the result of precipitation created by rain or snowmelt flowing over any exposed surface, such as equipment, roofs, roads, and pastures. As the water flows over urbanized and industrial areas it has the potential to pick up a number of contaminants like oil, sediment, chemicals, and litter. This water is then transported to nearby waterways. Polluted stormwater draining from urbanized areas is one of the leading causes of water pollution in lakes, streams, and oceans. This course describes the legal provisions related to stormwater pollution prevention as well as structural and operational best management practices at facilities.
 
[course outline]
 
The Stormwater Pollution Problem Regulatory Measures Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plans Hazardous Substance Releases Best Management Practices Structural BMPs Flow Diversion Secondary Containment Areas Catch Basins Wet Detention Pond Infiltration Basin
 
Regulations
 
Clean Water Act EPA Regulations Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act
•Identify causes of stormwater pollution •Describe legal provisions related to stormwater pollution prevention •Explain goals of a stormwater pollution prevention plan, or SWPPP •Describe best management practices, or BMPs •Distinguish structural BMPs from operational BMPs •Identify common structural BMPs and their methods •List operational BMPs and key procedures •Describe types of BMPs for preventing and responding to spills 0.5 Intermediate English
Metal on Metal Safety When working on heavy construction equipment, there are often situations when you have the need to strike a metal component of a machine with a hammer. Most hammers have hardened steel heads, and there is a hidden danger in striking two hardened metal surfaces together. This action can lead to sharp pieces of metal breaking out of the hammer or the struck piece of metal at very high velocity. This course will describe why this happens and what can be done to minimize the danger and protect yourself from injury.
 
[course outline]
 
Hardened Steel Hammers Alternative Tools Slide Hammer Malleable Alternatives Additional Guidelines PPE
Describe the primary danger of metal on metal hammering Describe what is unique about hardened steel List alternative work methods to avoid metal on metal impact Describe safety guidelines for metal on metal work Identify the proper PPE for metal on metal hammering 0.25 Intermediate English
First Aid – Initial Steps It’s not always clear what to do in a situation that requires first aid. Especially if it’s an emergency situation. This course spells it out, providing guidelines for what to do in an emergency first aid situation, and the order in which to do them. The course introduces a method called “DR. ABC” that stands for looking for danger before responding; checking to see if the victim is responsive; checking to see if the victim’s airway is clear; checking to see if the victim is breathing; and checking to see if the victim’s circulatory system is working. The course also explains the purpose (and limits) of emergency first aid, and the importance of summoning emergency medical assistance. Finally, it provides some general legal information about providing first aid.
 
[course outline]
 
The Purpose of First Aid Summoning Emergency Medical Assistance First Aid and Legal Issues First Things to Check DR. ABC Be Aware of Dangers Avoiding Dangers in a First-Aid Situation What Are Universal Precautions Check for Responsiveness If the Victim is
•Explain the purpose of emergency first aid •Explain the importance of summoning emergency medical assistance in a first-aid situation •Explain general legal guidelines related to providing first aid •List in order each of the five steps of the DR. ABC method •Describe what each step of DR. ABC is •Explain how to perform each step of DR. ABC 0.5 Intermediate English
First Aid – Automated External Defibrillator (AED) In some first aid situations, the victim’s heart will be beating too quickly or in an irregular manner. In cases like these, an automated external defibrillator, also known as an AED, can be used to shock the person’s heart back into a normal rhythm. In this course, you’ll learn when and how to use an AED, including an automatic AED and a semi-automatic AED.
 
[course outline]
 
First Aid When Someone Suddenly Collapses Summon Emergency Medical Assistance Check for Responsiveness Check and Clear the Airway Check for Breathing and Pulse What is an AED? How to Find an AED Instructions for Use AED Training Parts of an AED The AED Ma
•Explain the first aid to provide if someone suddenly collapses and appears to be unconscious •Explain the first aid to provide if you come upon someone who is unconscious •Explain when to summon emergency medical assistance •Explain what an AED is •Explain what an AED does •List and explain the different basic parts of an AED •List the two basic types of AEDs •List the steps of using an automatic AED •List the steps of using a semi-automatic AED 0.5 Intermediate English
First Aid – Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) If a person’s not breathing and their heart is not beating, they can die or suffer permanent brain damage very quickly. In situations like this, it’s important to know how to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR. This course explains when and how to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The proper process for providing Hands-Only CPR is also explained.
 
[course outline]
 
When A Person's Heart Isn't Beating Summon Emergency Medical Assistance First What is CPR? When CPR is Used The Importance of CPR Training Check Responsiveness, Airway, Breathing, and Circulation How to Perform CPR Performing CPR: Chest Compressions Perfo
•Explain when to summon emergency medical assistance if a person's heart isn't beating •Explain what CPR is •Explain when to provide CPR •List four things to check before performing CPR on a person •Explain how to provide CPR •Explain how to perform Hands-Only CPR 0.25 Intermediate English
First Aid – Heart Attacks and Cardiac Arrest Heart attacks and cardiac arrest are both health emergencies involving the heart. They are relatively common in America and they can lead to death if the person doesn’t get rapid first aid followed up by prompt medical care. This course explains what heart attacks and cardiac arrest are, how to recognize their symptoms, how to provide first aid, and the importance of summoning additional medical care for people suffering heart attacks and cardiac arrest.
 
[course outline]
 
Cardiac Emergencies: Heart Attacks and Cardiac Arrest Importance of Recognizing Symptoms of Heart Attack Symptoms of Heart Attack Summon Emergency Medical Care for a Heart Attack First Aid for Heart Attacks Importance of Recognizing Symptoms of Cardiac Ar
•Explain what a heart attack is •List some symptoms of a heart attack •Explain how to provide first aid for a person suffering a heart attack •Explain what cardiac arrest is •List some symptoms of a person in cardiac arrest •Explain how to provide first aid for a person in cardiac arrest 0.25 Intermediate English
First Aid – Shock When a person goes into shock, it can be a very serious and even fatal health situation. As a result, this course will explain some reasons people go into shock, list some symptoms of shock, explain first aid to provide to someone in shock, and note the importance of calling for qualified medical assistance to aid someone in shock.
 
[course outline]
 
Causes of Shock Symptoms of Shock Summon Emergency Medical Care First Aid for Shock Unresponsive Shock Victim
• Define "shock" • List some causes of shock • List common symptoms of shock • Explain the first aid for a person in shock 0.25 Intermediate English
First Aid – Breathing Emergencies People can have difficulty breathing for many reasons; these can be universally referred to as breathing emergencies. Breathing emergencies can be caused by choking, a punctured lung, an allergic reaction, exposure to chemicals or other toxins, asthma, and other causes. In this course you’ll learn more about the causes of breathing emergencies, symptoms of breathing emergencies, how to provide first aid, and you'll get guidance on calling for emergency medical assistance.
 
[course outline]
 
Causes of Breathing Emergencies Symptoms of Breathing Emergencies Summoning Emergency Medical Assistance First Aid – Breathing Emergencies When to Use the Heimlich Maneuver Performing the Heimlich Maneuver Performing Artificial Respiration
•List some causes of breathing emergencies •List some symptoms of breathing emergencies •Describe some initial first aid for a breathing emergency •Explain what the Heimlich maneuver is •Explain when to perform the Heimlich maneuver •Describe how to perform the Heimlich maneuver •Explain when to provide artificial respiration •Explain how to provide artificial respiration •Explain when to provide cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) 0.25 Intermediate English
First Aid – Stroke A stroke is a serious medical issue requiring emergency medical assistance. This course explains some causes and types of strokes, lists common stroke symptoms, introduces the American Stroke Association’s F.A.S.T. method for identifying stroke symptoms and calling for first aid, and provides first aid procedures.
 
[course outline]
 
Types of stroke Stroke Prevention Fixed Stroke Risk Factors Reversible Stroke Risk Factors Signs of a Stroke: F.A.S.T. The Four Steps of F.A.S.T. Beyond F.A.S.T: Other Signs of a Stroke First Aid for Stroke
• Explain how a stroke occurs • List some fixed risk factors for stroke • List some reversible risk factors for stroke • Explain each of the four steps in the F.A.S.T stroke detection and response method • List some additional symptoms of a stroke • Explain first aid for a person suffering a stroke 0.25 Intermediate English
First Aid – Bleeding Emergencies There are certain cases when a person is bleeding that are always emergencies. These include extreme blood loss, amputations, abdominal evisceration wounds, sucking chest wounds, and internal bleeding. This course explains the importance of calling for emergency medical assistance in these situations and lists the appropriate steps of first aid to provide.
 
[course outline]
 
Call for Emergency Medical Aid Protect Yourself First Aid for Severe Bleeding First Aid for Shock Apply Pressure to Pressure Using a Tourniquet for Severe Bleeding Amputation Wounds First Aid for Amputations Saving and Caring for the Amputated Body Part A
• Explain the importance of calling for emergency medical care if someone is bleeding severely • Explain the importance of protecting yourself before you provide first aid to a person who's bleeding severely • List items to use for your protection while providing first aid to a person who is bleeding • Define the terms "amputation," "abdominal evisceration wound," "sucking chest wound," and internal bleeding • List signs and symptoms for a sucking chest wound and internal bleeding • List first aid steps for severe bleeding, amputation, abdominal evisceration wound, impaled objects, sucking chest wound, and internal bleeding 0.5 Intermediate English
First Aid – Head, Neck, Back, and Spine Injuries Injuries to the head, neck, back, or spine can be especially dangerous because they can involve damage to the brain or spine, leading to death or permanent paralysis. This course describes the potential severity of these injuries, lists some tips for recognizing potentially serious injuries to the head, neck, back, or spine, and provides first aid tips for these situations.
 
[course outline]
 
Signs and Symptoms Call for Emergency Medical Care First Aid
• Explain why injuries to the head, neck, back, or spine must be treated with extra caution • List some signs and symptoms of an injury to the head, neck, back, or spine • Explain the importance and timing of summoning emergency medical care • List first aid steps for these injuries, including what NOT to do 0.25 Intermediate English
First Aid – Seizures A seizure is caused when there is sudden, abnormal electrical activity in the brain. Causes of seizures include diseases, such as epilepsy, brain injuries, fever, and reactions to drugs. Although most seizures are brief and cause no lasting harm, some seizures may be prolonged, presenting both immediate danger and long-term effects. In this course, you’ll learn about the symptoms and causes of seizures as well as first aid to provide a person experiencing a seizure.
 
[course outline]
 
What Is a Seizure? Symptoms of Seizures Person is Alert and Aware Person is Alert and Aware: First Aid Person is Awake but Not Aware Person is Awake but Not Aware: First Aid Person is Unconscious Person is Unconscious: First Aid
•Explain what a seizure is •List some causes of seizures •List three general sets of symptoms associated with seizures •Explain how to help or provide first aid for a seizure, depending on the set of symptoms •Explain when to summon emergency medical care when someone is having a seizure 0.25 Intermediate English
First Aid – Poisoning The word “poison” is a general term used to describe a substance that can cause illness or death. Poisons can include many things, including medicines, drugs, household products, workplace chemicals, plant and animal toxins, and gases. Poisons can be ingested, inhaled, injected, or absorbed into the body. This course explains what poisons are, lists some common poisons, gives tips for preventing exposure to poisons, explains the importance of contacting a Poison Control Center in the event of a poisoning, and explains first aid procedures for poison exposures.
 
[course outline]
 
What Is Poison? Methods of Exposure Preventing Poisonings Physical Symptoms of Poisoning Other Signs of Poisoning Emergency Medical Assistance The American Association of Poison Control Centers Be Prepared Preparing to Provide First Aid Providing First Ai
• State the definition of a "poison" • List some common types of poisons • List some common ways in which a person can be exposed to a poison • List some ways to prevent a poisoning from occurring • List some common symptoms of poisoning • Explain when to summon emergency medical care in the case of a poisoning • Explain when to call a Poison Control Center • Explain how to provide first aid for poison victims in different circumstances • List some ways to be better prepared in the event a poisoning does occur 0.25 Intermediate English
First Aid – Alcohol and Drug Overdose Alcohol and drug overdoses are serious situations at work. They can lead to poor job performance, workplace violence, severe injuries, and even death. In this course, you’ll learn some common types of drugs that can be overdosed on, symptoms of alcohol and drug overdoses, best practices for interacting with someone who’s overdosed on alcohol or drugs, and first aid to help the person who’s overdosed.
 
[course outline]
 
Types of Drugs Drugs at Work Drug Overdoses Getting Help First Aid for Drug Overdoses and Drug Abuse First Aid for Extreme Medical Emergencies
• List general types, or categories, of drugs • List some symptoms of a drug or alcohol overdose • List the type or types of emergency aid to summon, depending on the overdose case • List some actions to take while providing first aid to a drug overdose victim 0.25 Intermediate English
First Aid – Diabetic Emergencies Diabetes is a disease that is becoming increasingly more common in the United States and in other parts of the world. As a result, the chances that you or a coworker may suffer from a diabetes-related health emergency have increased as well. In this course, you’ll get a basic idea of what diabetes is, learn how to recognize symptoms of a diabetes-related health crisis, and will learn some tips for providing first aid to a person suffering from a diabetic emergency, including both high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and low blood sugar (hypoglycemia).
 
[course outline]
 
What is Diabetes? Hypoglycemia and Hyperglycemia Insulin Injection Kits and More Prevention and Self-Monitoring Telling Your Coworkers What to Tell Others Medic Alert Devices Symptoms of a Diabetic Emergency Overview Symptoms of Hypoglycemia First Aid for
•Explain the relationship between diabetes and blood sugar levels •Describe items used to monitor and control blood sugar levels •List symptoms related to hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) •Explain steps of providing first aid for someone with diabetes who's suffering from low blood sugar •List symptoms related to hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) •Explain steps for providing first aid to someone with diabetes who's suffering from high blood sugar 0.5 Intermediate English
First Aid – Head Injuries and Concussions Head injuries are common at work. In some cases, they can be quite minor, but in others, they can be very serious or even deadly. In this course, you’ll learn some tips for avoiding head injuries, how to recognize a concussion, how to provide first aid for minor and more serious head injuries, and how to provide first aid if the person has lost consciousness.
 
[course outline]
 
Head Injury Prevention First Aid for Minor Head Injuries Follow-Up for Minor Head Injuries Concussions Mild Concussions: Symptoms and First Aid Severe Concussions: Symptoms and First Aid Unconsciousness Other Serious Head Injuries
• List some ways to avoid suffering a head injury at work • Explain how to provide first aid for minor head injuries • Explain what a concussion is • Explain how to recognize a mild concussion and a more severe concussion • Explain first aid for a mild concussion • Explain first aid for a more severe concussion • Explain first aid for someone with a head injury who's lost consciousness • Explain how to recognize more severe head injuries • Explain how to provide first aid for someone with more severe head injuries 0.25 Intermediate English
First Aid – Eye Injuries A person’s eye can be injured easily while on the job. As a result, safety glasses or similar eye and face protection is important when appropriate. In addition, however, workers should know how to provide first aid for eye injuries suffered at work. This course covers first aid for eye injuries from chemicals, cuts and scratches, and for objects embedded in the eye, and provides general procedures for using safety showers and safety eyewashes.
 
[course outline]
 
The Eye, Eye Injuries, and Eye PPE PPE for the Eyes Hazardous Chemicals and HazCom Training Chemical In Eye: Three Key Steps Know Location of Eye Washes Types of Emergency Eye Washes Clean, Lukewarm Water for Twenty Minutes Using an Emergency Eye Wash Add
• Explain the importance of wearing eye protection • Explain what you should learn during hazard communication training, how it can help people avoid having eye injuries, and how it can help when there is an eye injury from a chemical exposure to the eye • List three steps of providing first aid for eye injuries caused when chemicals contact the eye • Explain how to use an emergency eye wash • List some ways to flush chemicals from the eye when there are no eye washes available • Explain how to provide first aid for cuts or scratches to the eye • Explain how to provide first aid when a person has an object embedded in their eyeball 0.25 Intermediate English
First Aid – Burns Burns are a common occurrence in life, including at work. These may be something as simple as a sunburn or as frightening as a radiation burn. Burns are generally discussed in terms of their severity—first degree, second degree, and third degree. In this course, you’ll learn how to prevent burns from occurring at work, how to recognize the degree of a burn, how to provide first aid for different degrees of burns, and how to provide first aid for special types of burns, including electrical burns, burns from chemical spills, and thermal (heat) burns.
 
[course outline]
 
Prevention First, Second, and Third Degree Burns First Degree Burns Second Degree Burns First Aid for First and Second Degree Burns Additional Medical Care for First and Second Degree Burns What Not to Do for First and Second Degree Burns Third Degree Bur
• List two ways to avoid being burned at work • Explain the difference between first, second, and third degree burns • Identify first, second, and third degree burns • Explain the first aid to provide for first and second degree burns • Explain the first aid to provide for third degree burns • Explain the first aid to give for sunburns • Explain special aspects of the first aid to provide for chemical burns • Explain special aspects of the first aid to provide for electrical burns 0.5 Intermediate English
First Aid – Broken Bones and Dislocations Broken and dislocated bones are a common injury in all walks of life, including at the workplace. By following safe work practices, properly guarding hazards, and wearing appropriate PPE, these injuries can be avoided. However, in some cases, broken bones will still occur. In this course you’ll learn some different types of broken bones and dislocations and how to provide first aid for them. You’ll also get some guidelines for when it’s necessary to summon emergency medical assistance to transport the person for additional medical care after first aid is provided.
 
[course outline]
 
Broken Bones and Dislocations Broken Bones (Fractures) Symptoms of Broken Bones Transporting Injured Person to a Doctor First Aid for a Broken Bone Applying a Splint Rib Fractures First Aid for a Fractured Rib Dislocated Bones First Aid for Dislocations
• Explain what a broken bone is • List some symptoms of broken bones • Explain when to arrange for emergency medical transport for a person with a broken bone • Explain how to provide first aid for a broken bone • Explain how to create and secure a splint • List some symptoms of a fractured rib • Explain how to provide first aid for a fractured rib • Explain what a dislocation is • Explain how to provide first aid for a dislocation 0.25 Intermediate English
First Aid – Snake Bites Bites from snakes of any type can be hazardous and require first aid. This is especially true with bites from poisonous snakes. This course focuses on first aid for bites from the four most common poisonous snakes in the United States: rattlesnakes, water moccasins, coral snakes, and copperheads. Information focuses on snake identification, bite prevention, and proper first aid.
 
[course outline]
 
Poisonous Snakes Rattlesnakes Water Moccasins Copperheads Coral Snakes Avoiding Snakes Safe Practices PPE First Aid for Poisonous Snake Bites Potential for Artificial Respiration and/or CPR Common Snake Bite First Aid Mistakes First Aid for Non-Poisonous
• Name the four most common poisonous snakes in the United States • Identify each of the four most common poisonous snakes in the United States • List some tips for avoiding snakebites • List some personal protective equipment (PPE) that can help protect people from snakebites • Explain the first aid to provide if a person has been bitten by a poisonous snake • Explain the first aid to provide if a person has been bitten by a non-poisonous snake 0.25 Intermediate English
First Aid – Animal and Human Bites and Scratches People can receive bites or scratches from small animals, larger animals including livestock and large predatory animals, and even other humans. All of these may be situations that require at least simple, basic first aid, and in some cases they may require additional emergency medical care. In this course, you’ll learn the basics of what to do if someone is bitten or scratched by a small animal, livestock, a larger predatory animal, or another person.
 
[course outline]
 
Small Animal Bites and Scratches Preventing Small Animal Bites and Scratches First Aid for Small Animal Bites and Scratches Small Animal Bites and Scratches—See a Doctor Dog and Cat Bites and Scratches Preventing Dog and Cat Bites and Scratches First Aid
•List some ways to avoid being bitten and scratched by small animals, cats, dogs, livestock, large predatory animals, and humans •Explain appropriate first aid for small animal, cat, dog, livestock, large predatory animal, and human bites and scratches 0.5 Intermediate English
First Aid – Dehydration Dehydration can be a serious health concern and if severe enough, can even be fatal. This course explains ways to stay properly hydrated, explains how people get dehydrated and symptoms of dehydration, and explains first aid techniques for mild and severe dehydration.
 
[course outline]
 
• Four Aspects of Proper Hydration • Proper Hydration • Diuretics • How the Body Loses Water • Preventing Dehydration • Urine Color • Dehydration Symptoms • Dehydration First Aid • First Aid for Severe Dehydration • Dehydration and Illness • He
• List the four main aspects of keeping properly hydrated • State how to stay well hydrated • Explain how people get dehydrated • List some ways to avoid dehydration • Describe some first aid for mild dehydration • Explain what to do if someone has severe dehydration 0.25 Intermediate English
Respirator Basics Respirators are important and commonly used in the workplace. This course explains what a respirator is and the types of hazards for which they can provide protection. It also explains the difference between air-supplying and air-purifying respirators as well as tight-fitting and loose-fitting respirators. The use of respirators within the hierarchy of controls is covered, as are assigned protection factor (APF), selection criteria, and cleaning, maintaining, inspecting, and storing procedures. Finally, training and personal responsibility are covered.
 
[course outline]
 
What Is a Respirator? Why Are Respirators Necessary? Air-Purifying and Air-Supplying Respirators Loose-Fitting and Tight-Fitting Respirators Tight-Fitting Respirators: Quarter, Half, and Full Masks Tight-Fitting Respirators: Negative- and Positive-Pressur
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.134: Respiratory Protection
• Explain what a respirator is • Identify three different types of hazardous environments that respirators can protect you from • Explain the difference between air-purifying and air-supplying respirators • Explain the difference between loose-fitting and tight-fitting respirators • Explain the proper use of respirators within the hierarchy of controls • Identify three factors to consider when selecting the proper respirator • Explain assigned protection factor • Explain the importance of and procedures for cleaning, inspecting, maintaining, and storing respirators • Explain what you should learn during respirator training • Explain the employee's responsibility for safe respirator use 0.5 Intermediate English
Air-Supplying Respirators Air-supplying respirators are one of two major classes of respirators (the other being air-purifying respirators). This course explains the basics of air-supplying respirators, including the three major types: self-contained breathing apparatuses, or SCBAs; supplied-air respirators (SARS), also called airline respirators; and combination respirators. Topics covered include uses, inspection, maintenance, cleaning, and storage of air-supplying respirators.
 
[course outline]
 
Air-Supplying Respirators Use of Air-Supplying Respirators Three Types of Air-Supplying Respirators Pressure Regulators Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus Advantages of SCBAs Disadvantages of SCBAs Supplied-Air Respirators Advantages of Supplied-Air Respi
 
Regulations
 
OSHA 19101.134
• Differentiate between an air-supplying respirator and an air-purifying respirator •Identify situations in which air-supplying respirators are commonly used •List three types of air-supplying respirators •List some characteristics of each type of air-supplying respirator •Describe general requirements for air-supplying respirator medical evaluations, fit tests, and seal checks •Describe general requirements for air-supplying respirator inspection, maintenance, cleaning, and storage 0.5 Intermediate English
Air-Purifying Respirators Air-purifying respirators are one of two major classes of respirators (the other being air-supplying respirators). This course explains the basics of air-purifying respirators, including the three major types: single-use disposable respirators, also called dust masks; air-purifying respirators with a flexible, elastomeric quarter-mask, half-mask, or full-mask facepiece; and powered air-purifying respirators, or PAPRs. Topics covered include uses, inspection, maintenance, cleaning, and storage of air-purifying respirators.
 
[course outline]
 
Air-Purifying Respirators and the Three Types of Air-Purifying Respirators Single-Use Disposable Respirators (Dust Mask Respirators) Tight-Fitting Elastomeric Respirators Full-, Half-, and Quarter-Mask Elastomeric Respirators Filters, Cartridges, and Cani
 
Regulations
 
OSHA 19101.134
•Differentiate between an air-purifying respirator and an air-supplying respirator •List situations in which air-purifying respirators are commonly used •List three types of air-purifying respirators •List some characteristics of each of the three types of air-purifying respirators •Explain what particulate filters, cartridges, and canisters are used for •Explain the lettering and numbering system for particulate filters •Explain the purpose of the color-coding system for cartridges or canisters •Describe general requirements for medical evaluations, fit tests, seal checks, inspection, maintenance, cleaning, and storage of air-purifying respirators 0.5 Intermediate English
Respirator Medical Evaluation and Fit Testing Before workers wear a respirator on the job, they must undergo a medical evaluation to see if they can wear the particular type of respirator safely. The medical evaluation looks for medical issues that might create a problem for the worker. In addition, after the medical evaluation, the worker should undergo a fit test to make sure the respirator fits properly and creates a tight seal. This course explains the medical evaluation and fit test in more detail.
 
[course outline]
 
Respirators and Hazards Purpose of Medical Evaluations and Fit Tests Respirators and Medical Evaluations Purpose of Medical Evaluation Medical Evaluation and Specific Health Conditions Respirator Fit Test Fit Tests and Specific Types of Respirators Respir
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.134: Respiratory Protection
• Explain why a respirator medical evaluation is necessary • Explain why a respirator fit test is necessary • Explain the order in which the medical evaluation, the fit test, and actual respirator use on the job should occur • Identify some medical conditions that might interfere with your use of a respirator • Identify some conditions that might interfere with the fit of a tight-fitting respirator • Identify some reasons why you may need to have a repeated respirator fit test • Explain how to perform a negative-pressure daily fit test for an air-purifying respirator • Explain how to perform a positive-pressure daily fit test for an air-purifying respirator • Explain how to perform a negative-pressure daily fit test for an air-supplying respirator • Explain how to perform a positive-pressure daily fit test for an air-supplying respirator 0.25 Intermediate English
Escape Respirators and SCSRs A respirator is a piece of personal protective equipment that guards the user against hazards in the air. There are many types of respirators and each type protects its user from a specific airborne hazard. Escape respirators allow a person who works in a normally safe environment enough time to escape if a respiratory hazard suddenly occurs. This course will discuss the different types of hazardous atmospheres that require escape respirators, how to select, inspect, and put on a self-contained self-rescuer, also called an SCSR, as well as how to use an SCSR.
 
[course outline]
 
Oxygen-Deficient Atmospheres IDLH Atmospheres Types of Escape Respirators Selecting an Escape Respirator What is an SCSR? SCSR Types General Information about SCSRs What You Must Know Inspecting Your SCSR SCSR Damage Indicators Caring for Your SCSR Addit
 
Regulations
 
30 CFR Part 46.5.c.1
•Explain what an escape respirator is •List the two main types of escape respirators •Explain typical hazardous atmospheres that call for escape respirators •Explain what a self-contained self-rescuer is •Explain how to select an appropriate escape respirator •List the items to look for when inspecting a self- contained self-rescuer •List in order the steps to properly don a self-contained self-rescuer •List factors to consider when using a self-contained self-rescuer 0.5 Intermediate English
Work Zone Safety A work zone is an area of roadway associated with construction, maintenance, or utility work activities. Work zones are typically marked by signs, channeling devices, pavement markings, and/or work vehicles. Because they are often adjacent to active roadways, work zone workers are exposed to significant risks. Motorists, cyclists, and pedestrians can also face significant risks. Roadways and work activities differ, and weather, traffic volumes, and local environments also vary, so a "one size fits" all approach to work zone safety is not appropriate. However, there are policies, procedures, and guidelines which do apply to all. These are covered in this course.
 
[course outline]
 
Work Zone Hazards Work Zone Safety and Mobility Rule Transportation Management Plans (TMPs) Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Improving Work Zone Safety Positive Protection Devices Exposure Control Measures Other Traffic Control Measures Traffic Cont
 
Regulations
 
Work Zone Safety and Mobility Rule, 23 CFR § 630.1002-1016 (2015). Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD), 23 CFR § 655.603 (2015).
•Define the term “work zone” •List hazardous conditions that work zones can present •Describe the components of a “Transportation Management Plan,” which can include a “Temporary Traffic Control” plan, “Transportation Operations” plan, and “Public Information” plan •Describe the purpose and contents of the “Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices” •Identify and describe “positive protection devices,” “exposure control measures,” and “other traffic control measures” •Identify the four areas of a work zone •Describe the elements of an “Internal Traffic Control Plan” for a work zone •List safe behaviors to use when driving in or around work zones 0.5 Intermediate English
Steel Erection Safety Steel erection involves assembling and connecting steel beams to form a structural frame for buildings and bridges. There are many obvious hazards associated with lifting large, heavy steel members and working at heights. According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, an average of 15 ironworkers die each year in work related accidents. Precautions should be taken to prevent injuries during the construction, alteration, and/or repair of single and multi-story buildings, bridges, and other structures where steel erection occurs. This module provides hazard awareness information to prevent the most common incidents.
 
[course outline]
 
Steel Erection Hazards Approval Site Layout Erection Planning Hoisting and Rigging Crane Inspection Multiple-Lift Rigging Column Anchorage Connecting Structural Steel Double Connections Open Web Steel Joists Open Web Steel Joist Bridging Falling Objects F
 
Regulations
 
OSHA 29 CFR 1926 Subpart R
•Identify the leading causes of serious injuries and fatalities for steel erection •Identify steel erection hazards •Identify and describe safe erection procedures and how to prevent a structure from collapsing •Describe fall protection procedures and equipment •Describe how to prevent injuries from falling objects 0.5 Intermediate English
Safety Management: Incident Investigation As long as people work, there will be safety-related incidents and near misses. But those incidents can be used to make the workplace safer if they are investigated, analyzed, and corrected to prevent their recurrence. This course discusses reasons for incident investigations, the phases of an incident investigation, team leader responsibilities, and who comprises the investigation team. It then provides information on best practices for interviewing witnesses, determining the root cause of an incident, and corrective and follow-up actions.
 
[course outline]
 
Reasons for Incident Investigations Incident Investigation Phases Initial Response and Next Steps Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Responsibilities Investigation Team Teamwork Interviewing and Incident Witness Beginning the Analysis Investigation Team – Pr
• State the reasons and importance of conducting incident investigations • State the three phases of an incident investigation • Define "root cause" • State the responsibilities of an incident investigation team leader • List methods for obtaining facts and avoiding blame when speaking to witnesses • State the primary objectives of an incident investigation team • Identify methods for determining the causes of an incident • List some long term corrective actions to prevent incidents from occurring in the future 0.5 Intermediate English
Hand Safety Imagine performing daily activities such as writing, driving a car, or using a phone without your hands. Because hands are used so frequently, hand safety can be taken for granted. The construction and manufacturing industries pose a particular risk to the hands due to the size and complexity of the equipment and machinery present. This course will provide general hand safety awareness and discuss techniques for avoiding common hand injuries.
 
[course outline]
 
Physiology of the Hand General Hand Safety Moving Parts Sharp Edges Extreme Temperatures Electrical Hazards Chemical and Biological Hazards Ergonomic Hazards Personal Protective Equipment Treatment
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.132: Personal Protective Equipment
•Identify and describe the parts of the hand •Identify safety guidelines for working with your hands •Identify the proper personal protective equipment (PPE) when working with your hands 0.25 Intermediate English
Slips, Trips, and Falls Falling at work may not seem very dangerous, but falls are the leading cause of workplace injuries. They commonly cause cuts, bruises, broken bones, back injuries, sprains, and strains. Hazards that cause slips, trips, and falls can be controlled and eliminated if they are identified, reported, and corrected. This course describes common causes of slips, trips, and falls, how they can be prevented, and first aid procedures for fall injuries.
 
[course outline]
 
Causes of Falls: Slips Causes of Falls: Trips Falls Prevention Housekeeping Safe Walking Surfaces Footwear Safe Work Practices Stair Safety Ladder Safety Mounting and Dismounting Vehicles Platforms Storage and Loading Dock Areas Slippery Surfaces and Bad
 
Regulations
 
OSHA 29 CFR 1910, Subpart D: Walking-Working Surfaces
•Define "slips," "trips," and "falls" •Identify common causes of slips, trips, and falls •Identify ways to prevent slips, trips, and falls, including good housekeeping procedures •List tips for walking on slippery surfaces, on stairs, and in bad weather •List proper procedures for the use, placement, and care of ladders •Describe steps to take when a slip, trip, or fall hazard has been identified •Describe first aid steps for slip, trip, and fall injuries 0.5 Intermediate English
First Aid – Spider Bites Spider bites are typically minor issues, but they can be more serious. And that’s especially true in the U.S. if the spider is a black widow, a brown recluse, or a hobo spider. In this course, you’ll learn basic first aid for minor spider bites. In addition, you’ll learn what black widows, brown recluses, and hobo spiders look like; where in the U.S. they tend to live; the kind of areas they’re commonly found in; why they tend to bite and how to avoid their bites; proper PPE to wear when in an area they may live in; symptoms of their bites; first aid for their bites; and the importance of calling for qualified medical care if one of these three spiders has bitten someone.
 
[course outline]
 
Avoiding Spider Bites First Aid for Most Spider Bites Poisonous Spiders Black Widow Spiders Where Black Widows Live Black Widow Spider Bite Symptoms Brown Recluse Spiders Where Brown Recluses Live Brown Recluse Spider Bite Symptoms Hobo Spiders Where Hobo
•List some ways to avoid being bitten by a spider •List some first aid steps for a person with a minor spider bite •Identify and describe three poisonous spiders found in the United States •Explain where each of those poisonous spiders commonly lives •List some symptoms of bites from three poisonous spiders in the U.S. •Explain proper first aid for serious spider bites from poisonous spiders 0.25 Intermediate English
First Aid – Unconsciousness People can lose consciousness for many reasons. This course explains some of the most common reasons, explains the importance of calling for qualified medical assistance, and gives tips for providing first aid.
 
[course outline]
 
Causes of Unconsciousness Try to “Wake Up” the Unconscious Person Check the ABCs First Aid First Aid – Regains Consciousness
•Explain what unconsciousness is •List some causes of unconsciousness •Explain when to call for emergency medical care if someone is unconscious •Describe the process of providing first aid for a person who's unconscious 0.25 Intermediate English
Safety Management: Medical and Exposure Records Access The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires employers to provide a safe workplace for their employees. To ensure this, OSHA maintains several standards that describe employee rights for a hazard-free workplace. The Access to Medical and Exposure Records Standard (29 CFR 1910.1020) describes employees’ rights to access their medical records and information about exposure to toxic substances and harmful physical agents. This module describes employees’ right of access, what types of records they have access to, and record retention requirements for employers.
 
[course outline]
 
Access to Records Access Designated Representatives Exposure Records Trade Secrets Medical Records Exempt Records Employer Communication Requirements Medical Records Retention Exposure Records Retention Going Out of Business
 
[Regulations]
 
29 CFR 1910.1020
• Describe OSHA requirements for the Access to Exposure and Medical Records Standard • List and describe the types of records that must be maintained • Describe employee rights to access medical and exposure records • List record retention requirements 0.25 Intermediate English
Universal Waste Storage and Handling There are four main categories of universal waste: batteries, lamps, pesticides, and mercury-containing equipment. These special categories of hazardous wastes are meant to reduce the management burden and facilitate the recycling of universal wastes. This course will cover storage, container labeling, handling, and spill cleanup procedures for universal wastes.
 
[course outline]
 
Introduction to Waste Recycling Types of Universal Waste Storage Labeling Batteries Used Battery Storage Lead-Acid Battery Storage Lamps Lamp Storage and Handling Preventing Broken Lamps Mercury Mercury-Containing Equipment Mercury Health Effects Mercury
 
Regulations
 
40 CFR: Part 273
• List the four categories of universal waste • Describe universal waste requirements • Describe appropriate storage and handling procedures for each type of universal waste • Describe the hazards of universal wastes • List the materials required and steps taken to cleanup mercury and pesticide spills 0.5 Intermediate English
Pollution Prevention Best Practices Pollution is the contamination of the environment by substances that harm plants, animals, people, or natural resources. Most people are familiar with the three major forms of pollution: air, water, and land. Polluting these natural resources has both local and global impacts. This course describes ways to identify and reduce pollution at its source.
 
[course outline]
 
Pollution Prevention Sustainability Pollution Prevention Benefits Source Reduction Source Reduction Methods Waste Assessment Evaluating Environmental Impact Waste Reduction Process Flow Diagrams Life Cycle Assessment Product Design Green Chemistry Environ
 
Regulations
 
Pollution Prevention Act
• Define pollution prevention, source reduction, and sustainability • List the benefits of pollution prevention • Describe pollution prevention strategies • Describe the purpose of an environmental management system 0.5 Intermediate English
SPCC Inspections The purpose of the EPA’s Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure rule is to prevent oil contamination of navigable waterways and adjoining shorelines. Facilities which store or handle sufficient quantities of oil are required to create an SPCC plan, which includes inspection and testing procedures and schedules. The purpose of SPCC inspections is to prevent oil discharges due to container and equipment failures. Personnel conducting the inspections are trained to look for signs of corrosion, leaks, brittle fracture, overflows, and other problems.
 
[course outline]
 
SPCC Plans SPCC Rule Application Inspections, Tests, and Recordkeeping Inspection Frequency “Baseline Conditions” Inspection Frequency and Scope Monthly SPCC Inspection Items Annual SPCC Inspection Items Other Tests and Inspections Brittle Fracture Testin
 
Regulations
 
40 CFR 112 (2016): Oil Pollution Prevention
•List the key elements of an SPCC plan •List the inspection and testing requirements for SPCC- regulated facilities •Define the terms "baseline conditions" and "brittle fracture" •List the factors which influence the frequency and scope of tests and inspections at SPCC-regulated facilities •Describe common elements of monthly SPCC inspections •Describe common elements of annual SPCC inspections 0.5 Intermediate English
SPCC Run-On and Runoff The purpose of the EPA’s SPCC rule is to prevent oil contamination of navigable waters and adjoining shorelines. Facilities which store or handle large quantities of oil are required to create an SPCC plan whose purpose is to prevent, control, and deal with oil discharges. One way these facilities can unintentionally discharge oil to waterways is with runoff. To prevent this, they can prevent run-on from reaching equipment with the potential for oil discharges, and also prevent oil-containing runoff from leaving the facility. This course describes the containment measures that can be used to accomplish these goals.
 
[course outline]
 
SPCC Plans SPCC Rule Application What Is Run-On? Why Is Run-On Undesirable? What Is Runoff? Run-On Control Passive vs. Active Containment Runoff Control Monitoring and Testing
 
Regulations
 
40 CFR 112 (2016): Oil Pollution Prevention
•Define the terms "run-on," "runoff," and "freeboard" •Describe why it is important to control run-on and runoff at SPCC-regulated facilities •Describe how the "freeboard" volume can be determined for secondary containment •Describe devices and strategies that can be used to minimize or control run-on at SPCC-regulated facilities •Describe devices and strategies that can be used to control or prevent runoff at SPCC-regulated facilities •Describe the difference between "active" and "passive" containment 0.5 Intermediate English
Construction Site Stormwater Runoff Control Construction site activities often disturb or expose soil, which can increase erosion and cause sediment to be picked up and carried off by stormwater runoff. If not controlled, this sediment and other pollutants at construction sites can be carried away and deposited in nearby wetlands, waterways, and fragile habitats. This can harm aquatic plants, fish, and wildlife, and degrade water quality for municipal, industrial, and recreational uses. In the U.S., operators of large construction sites are often required to obtain stormwater discharge permits from the EPA, the state, or local authorities. To begin this process, you must create and implement a stormwater pollution prevention plan (SWPPP).
 
[course outline]
 
What Is Stormwater Runoff? Erosion and Stormwater Runoff Other Construction Site Pollutants Construction General Permits (CGPs) Notice of Intent (NOI) Site Assessment Erosion and Sediment Control BMPs Overview Erosion and Sediment Control BMPs Housekeepin
 
Regulations
 
40 CFR 450 (2009): Construction and Development Effluent Guidelines and Standards
• Define the terms “construction site,” “stormwater runoff,” and “erosion” • List and describe the possible impacts of common construction site pollutants on nearby wetlands, waterways, and fragile habitats • List the site characteristics that must be evaluated and described in stormwater pollution prevention plans (SWPPPs) • Describe how erosion control and sediment control best management practices (BMPs) work • Distinguish between structural and non-structural BMPs • List some key housekeeping BMPs for construction sites • List the order in which documents, plans, and permits are created before, during, and after a large construction project 0.5 Intermediate English
SPCC Secondary Containment At facilities regulated by the SPCC Rule, all containers, equipment, and areas with the potential for oil discharges are subject to secondary containment requirements. Affected equipment and areas must have “appropriate containment” that is able to contain the most likely quantity of oil that would be discharged until it can be cleaned up. The original containers, equipment, and piping serve as the “primary containment,” while the “secondary containment” serves as “backup” protection against spills, leaks, and primary containment failures. This course describes the secondary containment that can be used to prevent oil discharges.
 
[course outline]
 
SPCC Plans Secondary Containment Requirements Passive v. Active Containment Sizing of Secondary Containment Buildings and Vaulted Tanks What is "Sufficient Freeboard"? Impracticability Determinations Qualitifed Oil-filled Equipment Flowlines and Gathering
 
Regulations
 
40 CFR 112 (2016): Oil Pollution Prevention
• Define the terms "primary containment," "secondary containment," "sufficiently impervious," "vaulted tank," "run-on," and "sufficient freeboard" • Describe how "active" and "passive" containment measures differ • Calculate the required capacity for a secondary containment structure responsible for two fuel tanks • List the alternative measures that are required when secondary containment has been deemed "impracticable" • List the responsibilities of EPA inspectors at SPCC- regulated facilities • Describe the reportable discharge history criteria for facilities wishing to use alternate measures • Describe the alternative measures equipment allowed by the EPA in place of inspections when there has been no “impracticability determination" 0.5 Intermediate English
Safety Management: Near Miss Best Practices The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has described near misses as incidents where no property was damaged and no personal injury sustained, but where, given a slight shift in time or position, damage and/or injury easily could have occurred. It has been shown that injury and damage-producing events are frequently preceded by warning signs or near miss incidents. For this reason, a program designed to identify, record, and address near miss incidents will improve worker safety and the safety culture of an organization.
 
[course outline]
 
“Near Miss” vs. “Near Hit” Useful Definitions “Near Miss” Examples Heinrich’s Triangle Near Miss Programs Near Miss Best Practices Near Miss Program Participation
• Define the terms “near miss,” “incident,” “best practice,” “root cause,” and “controls” • Identify near miss incidents • List items that should be included in all near miss reports • List best practices for near miss programs • Identify the roles of workers, supervisors, and management in near miss programs • List the benefits of the proactive safety improvements generated by near miss programs • Identify ways to improve participation in near miss programs 0.25 Intermediate English
Pressure Washing Best Management Practices Pressure washing generally refers to the practice of using water sprayed through a nozzle at high pressure to clean or strip material from various surfaces. This technique typically produces contaminated wastewater that can flow into a nearby waterway without proper intervention. This course describes pressure washing best practices and steps to take to avoid polluting open water.
 
[course outline]
 
Pressure Washers Pressure Washer Safety Guidelines Wash Water Wash Water Collection Best Management Practices BMP – Planning BMP – Pre-Cleaning BMP – Proper Technique BMP – Collection BMP – Disposal
•Define pressure washing •Describe the equipment used for pressure washing •Describe some of the hazards present during pressure washing •Describe the primary environmental hazard posed by pressure washing •List some best management practices to mitigate the environmental impact of pressure washing •List some of the techniques used to increase the efficiency of pressure washing •Describe some methods of wash water collection •Describe some methods of wastewater disposal 0.5 Intermediate English
Volatile Solvent Spill Response Spills involving volatile solvents are a unique class of spills. This is due to the fact that in addition to any damage and pollution directly caused by the spilled liquid, evaporation of a volatile solvent will contaminate the air in the vicinity with the gaseous form of the liquid. Because the vapors from most volatile solvents are flammable and toxic to some degree, the response to this type of spill must take the presence of the vapor into consideration.
 
[course outline]
 
Volatility Hazard Response to Vapor Response to Liquid Preparedness Caution Large Spills
• Define the meaning of “volatility” • Describe the significant difference between a volatile solvent spill and a normal spill • Describe how to deal with the vapor of a solvent spill • Describe how to deal with the liquid portion of a solvent spill • Describe how to deal with a large scale volatile liquid spill 0.25 Intermediate English
Safety Management: Floor and Walkway Safety and Auditing Slips, trips, and falls (or STFs) are a leading cause of work-related injuries, including sprains, strains, fractures, contusions, and abrasions. STFs also account for 15% of all accidental deaths; second only to motorized vehicles as a cause of workplace fatalities. STFs also account for ~15% of workplace fatalities, second only to those related to motorized vehicles. While STFs can occur on level surfaces and at elevated heights, this course focuses only on STFs which occur on level surfaces.
 
[course outline]
 
Definitions for Slips, Trips, and Falls Common Causes of Slips Common Causes of Trips Contributing Factors to Slips Contributing Factors to Trips Walking and Working Surface Regulations Floor and Walkway Audits Coefficients of Friction and Slip Resistance
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.22 (1996): Occupational Safety and Health Standards
•Define "slips," "trips," and "falls" •Identify common causes and contributing factors for slips and trips •Describe the difference between static coefficient of friction (SCOF) and dynamic coefficient of friction (DCOF) values •Describe U.S. regulations for walking surfaces at worksites •Describe the operations of common slip resistance test devices, including a pendulum tester, tribometer, variable-angle ramp, and variable incidence tribometer •Describe the five "5S" housekeeping strategies •Describe safety guidelines related to floor surface repairs, maintenance, and cleaning; footwear; building entrances; leaks and drips; spill response; worker training; and the use of signs, barricades, and lighting 0.5 Intermediate English
Safety Management: Slip, Trip, and Fall Prevention Inspections Slips, trips, and falls (STFs) are a leading cause of work-related injuries, and the second leading cause of workplace fatalities, after motorized vehicle incidents. A comprehensive floor and walkway safety program can greatly reduce STF hazards and incidents. Among other things, this program should include floor and walkway audits and STF prevention inspections performed by trained and qualified persons. STF prevention inspections should include annual inspections, routine safety inspections, and change analyses.
 
[course outline]
 
Definitions Types of Inspections Audits and Inspections Common STF Hazards Housekeeping and Safe Work Practices Additional Safe Work Practices Floor Condition Inspection Other Key Inspection Items
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910 (2016): Occupational Safety and Health Standards
• Define “slips,” “trips,” and “falls” • Identify and describe three types of STF prevention inspections • Identify who should perform STF prevention inspections • Identify common STF hazards • List housekeeping procedures and safe work practices that can help prevent STF hazards and incidents • List items which should be included in inspection checklists 0.5 Intermediate English
Aboveground Storage Tank Requirements (AST) Any storage container of at least 55 gallons that is completely aboveground, partially buried (<10%), or located in a bunker or subterranean vault is considered an aboveground storage tank, or AST. The majority of storage tanks hold petroleum products, so ASTs pose a significant threat to the environment. To prevent leaks, ASTs are regulated by the Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) rule. This course will summarize the SPCC regulations that apply to aboveground storage tanks.
 
[course outline]
 
SPCC Rule Applicability Tank Leaks AST Requirements Secondary Containment Recommended practices Inspections Inspections Inspection Frequency Formal Inspections Integrity Testing Out of Service Tanks Transfers Overfill Protection Identifying Spills or Leak
 
Regulations
 
40 CFR Part 112: Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) Rule
•Identify an aboveground storage tank •Describe the SPCC rule and how it applies to aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) •Describe secondary containment requirements •Describe inspection and integrity testing requirements •Describe safe procedures for transferring product to an aboveground storage tank •List acceptable overfill protection methods •Identify leaks and spills •Describe the purpose and content of a spill response plan 0.5 Intermediate English
Underground Storage Tank Requirements (UST) Any tank, and associated underground piping, with at least 10% of its volume underground is considered an underground storage tank (UST). Until the 1980s, most USTs were made of bare steel, which easily corroded. This allowed the tank contents to leak into the environment and contaminate soil and groundwater. So, beginning in 1984, Congress passed a series of laws to address leaking underground storage tanks that contain petroleum or other hazardous substances. The federal UST program sets minimum operating requirements and technical standards for tank design and installation, spill and overfill control, leak detection and response, and corrective actions. This course will summarize underground storage tank regulations.
 
[course outline]
 
Importance of UST Regulations UST Program Overview and Requirements Exempt Underground Storage Tanks Underground Storage Tank Systems Secondary Containment Dispensers Release Prevention and Spill Protection Automatic shutoff Devices and Overfill Alarms Ba
 
Regulations
 
40 CFR Part 280
• Describe the purpose of underground storage tank regulations • Identify a regulated underground storage tank • Describe the underground storage tank requirements • Identify the agency that enforces the regulations • Describe the purpose and function of common underground storage tank components • Describe methods to prevent leaks, spills, and overfills • Describe how to respond to a release • Describe corrosion protection methods • Identify the three underground storage tank operator classes and describe their responsibilities 0.5 Intermediate English
Bioremediation Tactics Bioremediation refers to a set of processes which involve the use of living things to break down hazardous substances in the environment into less toxic or non-toxic substances and restore contaminated soil or water to its original unpolluted state. There are many methodologies which fall into the category of bioremediation. All involve living organisms. Some work by stimulating or enhancing the inclination of certain microorganisms to break down undesirable, polluting substances. Other methods involve the use of fungi or plants to achieve the same purpose.
 
[course outline]
 
Biodegradation Microorganisms Bioremediation Biostimulation Aerobic vs Anaereobic Treatment Methods In Situ Treatment Ex Situ Treatment – Land Farming Ex Situ Treatment – Biopiles Ex Situ Treatment – Slurry Phase Ex Situ Methods Summary Open Water Mycrore
• Define the terms “bioremediation,” “biostimulation,” and “phytoremediation” • Explain the mechanism which underlies bioremediation • Describe the difference between “in situ” and “ex situ” remediation • Describe the advantage of in situ treatment • List some of the ex situ treatments • Describe the mechanism of mycroremediation • Describe some phytoremediation methods {and} • List the limitations of phytoremediation 0.5 Intermediate English
Hazardous Material Labeling People commonly work near or with many different hazardous chemicals. Pesticides, paints, solvents, acids, gasoline, compressed gases such as propane, and liquid cleaning products such as bleach are just a few of the hazardous chemicals workers can be exposed to on a regular basis. To ensure workers are provided with sufficient information to understand the hazards of the chemicals they work with, OSHA maintains a Hazard Communication Standard (HCS). Hazardous material labeling is a key element of the HCS. This module will cover the labeling requirements of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS) and alternative workplace labeling options.
 
[course outline]
 
HazCom 2012 GHS Hazard Labels Product and Supplier Identification Pictograms Signal Words Hazard Statements Precautionary Statements Precautionary Statement example Supplemental Information Example GHS Label Workplace Labels HMIS Chemical Labels NFPA Chem
 
Regulations
 
OSHA's Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS)
• Describe the purpose of HazCom 2012 and the GHS • Identify and describe the elements of GHS hazard labels • Describe the requirements of hazardous material labeling in the workplace 0.5 Intermediate English
Hazardous Material Classifications To ensure workers are provided with sufficient information to understand the hazards of the chemicals they work with, OSHA maintains a Hazard Communication Standard (HCS). The Hazard Communication Final Rule (HazCom 2012) is aligned with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals, or GHS, which provides standard criteria for determining chemical hazards to ensure different manufacturers and importers classify hazards similarly. This module will focus on the hazard classes defined by HazCom 2012.
 
[course outline]
 
HazCom 2012 Chemical Manufacturers and Importers Hazard Classification Hazard Classes Health Hazards Health Hazard Classes Hazard Sub-categories Physical Hazard Classes Environmental Toxicity GHS Labels Pictograms Example GHS Label DOT Hazardous Material
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.1200: Hazard Communication
• Describe the purpose of HazCom 2012 and the GHS • Describe how chemical hazards are classified • Identify and describe the health and physical hazards outlined by HazCom 2012 • Identify chemical hazards from pictograms and statements on container labels • Explain how to protect yourself and prevent chemical exposures 0.5 Intermediate English
Hazardous Material Storage People commonly work near or with many different hazardous chemicals. Pesticides, paints, solvents, acids, gasoline, compressed gases such as propane, and liquid cleaning products such as bleach are just a few of the hazardous chemicals workers can be exposed to on a regular basis. The risk of being exposed to a hazardous chemical is greatly reduced when the chemical is handled and stored according to manufacturer recommendations and in compliance with facility standards. This module will present best practices for the safe storage of hazardous chemicals.
 
[course outline]
 
Safe Storage Guidelines Compressed Gas Storage Flammables Storage Oxidizers Chemical Storage Corrosives Storage Toxic Chemical Storage Water-Reactive Chemical Storage Pyrophoric Chemical Storage Chemical Storage Area Inspections
 
Regulations
 
OSHA 29 CFR 1910: Subpart H
• List and describe general hazardous material storage guidelines • Describe the required storage conditions for some specific hazards • Describe storage area inspection criteria 0.25 Intermediate English
Worker Right to Know (RTK) Workers have the right to know and understand the hazards presented by the chemicals they use and how to work with them safely. Employers must maintain a list of all chemicals on site and provide employees with safety data sheets, which contain detailed information about the chemical and its hazards. This module is designed to ensure workers know what information should be provided to them and to help them understand that information. It describes the requirements of the Right to Know Standard and each section of a safety data sheet.
 
[course outline]
 
Right to Know Hazardous Material List Safety Data Sheets SDS Section 1: Identification SDS Section 2: Hazards Identification SDS Section 3: Composition SDS Section 4: First-aid Measures SDS Section 5: Fire-fighting Measures SDS Section 6: Accidental Relea
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.1200: The Hazard Communication (Right-to-Know) Standard
• Describe the purpose of the Right-to-Know law • List the required modes of hazard communication • List and interpret important information found in safety data sheets • Identify and describe the information on hazardous chemical labels • Describe training requirements according to the Right-to-Know law 0.5 Intermediate English
Storage and Handling of Corrosives Corrosives are substances that damage or destroy other substances on contact. Most are strong acids, strong bases, or concentrated solutions of weak acids or weak bases. To safely store and handle corrosives, read the container labels and safety data sheets, and follow the requirements and precautions they contain. Also follow the storage and handling best practices for hazardous chemicals and corrosives for your workplace and listed in this course, and keep an accurate inventory at all times.
 
[course outline]
 
Introduction to Corrosives and Corrosion Common Corrosives Hazards of Corrosives HazCom Standards Chemical Labeling Systems Additional Standards and Regulations Up-to-date Inventories Storage and Handling Best Practices Storage and Handling of Corrosives
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910 (2016): Hazard Communication Standard
• Define the terms “corrosive” and “corrosion” • List hazards that are associated with corrosives • Describe the requirements for workplace chemicals in OSHA’s HazCom Standard • List the information included in labels on chemical containers • List storage and handling best practices for hazardous chemicals • List storage and handling best practices for corrosives 0.5 Intermediate English
Storage and Handling of Pesticides Pesticides are used in many different applications to prevent, destroy, repel, and mitigate “pests.” A “pest” can be any plant or animal that endangers our food supply, health, or comfort. Because pesticides are toxic, they are inherently hazardous. To avoid their potential hazards, always review and follow the recommendations and precautions listed on pesticide labels and in SDSs, and adhere to the best practices presented in this course, plus any that have been established for your workplace.
 
[course outline]
 
Benefits of Pesticides Pesticide Regulations and Information Hazards of Pesticides Acute vs. Chronic Toxicity Pesticide Toxicity Categories Worker Protection Standard Pesticide Labeling Requirements Worker Protection Standard (WPS) HazCom Standards Storag
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910 (2016): Hazard Communication Standard
• Define “pesticide,” “pest,” “acute toxicity,” “chronic toxicity,” “LD50,” “early-entry worker,” and “restricted entry interval” • Describe major pesticide classes – herbicides, insecticides, molluscicides, fungicides, and rodenticides • Identify the major benefits of pesticides • Describe the roles of the EPA, WHO, and foreign governments in regulating pesticides and protecting workers • Identify pesticide exposure hazards for humans • List the information that is required on pesticide labels • List storage and handling best practices for pesticides • Identify who to contact if you have questions about pesticides or pesticide poisoning 0.5 Intermediate English
Storage and Handling of Flammables GHS Category 1 and 2 Flammable liquids have flash points below 73.4 °F (23 °C), which means that they produce vapors that can ignite and burn at normal working temperatures if an ignition source is present. Their ability to self-ignite and to explode under certain conditions make them particularly hazardous. To safely store and handle flammable liquids, read and understand their labels and safety data sheets, and follow the best practices and regulations included in this course and established for your worksite or location.
 
[course outline]
 
Introduction to Flammables GHS Flammable Liquid Categories HazCom Standards Chemical Labels Hazards of Flammables Storage and Handling Best Practices Up-to-date Inventories
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910 (2016): Occupational Safety and Health Standards NFPA 30: Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code
• Define the terms “flash point,” “boiling point,” “autoignition temperature,” “explosive limits” • Differentiate between “combustibles” and “flammables” • Describe how flammables and combustibles are classified or categorized • Describe OSHA’s HazCom Standard workplace requirements for hazardous chemicals • Describe how flammability is indicated on chemical labels • Identify the characteristics of flammables which make them especially hazardous • List storage and handling best practices for flammable liquids 0.5 Intermediate English
Storage and Handling of Combustibles Category 3 and 4 flammables, previously identified as “combustibles,” have higher flash points than category 1 and 2 flammables, which means that they require higher temperatures to produce vapors that will ignite and burn if an ignition source is present. To safely store and handle combustible liquids, make sure you read and understand their labels and safety data sheets, and fully understand their hazards. Also follow the combustible liquid storage and handling best practices in this course and for your workplace.
 
[course outline]
 
Introduction to Combustibles GHS Flammable Liquid Categories HazCom Standards Chemical Labels Hazards of Combustibles Storage and Handling Best Practices Up-to-date Inventories
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910 (2016): Hazard Communication Standard
• Define the terms “flash point” and “boiling point” • Differentiate between “combustibles” and “flammables” • Describe how flammables and combustibles are categorized • Describe the workplace requirements for hazardous chemicals in OSHA’s HazCom Standard • Describe how flammability is indicated on chemical labels • Identify the characteristics of combustibles which make them especially hazardous • List storage and handling best practices for combustibles 0.5 Intermediate English
Mechanical Power Press Safety A mechanical power press (MPP) is a machine that uses dies and pressure to shear, punch, form, and assemble metal or other material. They can develop up to several thousand tons of pressure, and the area where they perform work – the "point of operation" – poses a serious pinch point hazard. They also contain rotating component and in-running nip point hazards. The primary and secondary safeguards that are used on MPPs depend on several things. All safeguards must be inspected and tested on a regular basis to make sure that they function correctly and meet all current safety standards.
 
[course outline]
 
Mechanical Power Press Introduction Mechanical Power Press Components Mechanical Power Press Operation Mechanical Power Press Types Operating Modes Mechanical Power Press Configurations Primary and Secondary Safeguards Primary Safeguard Design Criteria Po
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.147 Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout) 29 CFR 1910.212 General Requirements For All Machines 29 CFR 1910.217 Mechanical Power Press Machine Guarding 29 CFR 1910.219 MPTA ANSI B11.1 – 2009 Best Safety Practices For Mechanical Power P
Identify and describe the main components of a mechanical power press (MPP) Describe the operation of a MPP Describe the main difference between a full revolution press and a part revolution press Describe the operating modes for MPPs, including Off, Single Stroke, Continuous, Inch, and Jog Describe primary safeguards that can be used on a MPP, including guards, gates, two-hand controls/trips, and presence-sensing devices List secondary safeguards and complementary equipment that can be used on MPPs Describe inspection and recordkeeping requirements for MPPs 0.5 Intermediate English
First Aid – Scorpion Stings Scorpions can be found throughout most of the United States. However, the only scorpion commonly thought to be dangerous to a healthy adult is the bark scorpion, which is typically found in the Southwest. In most cases, a scorpion sting calls for only some minor first aid and perhaps some rest. But bites from a bark scorpion, or bites to children, elderly, or ill people, may require additional first aid. This course explains first aid for a scorpion bite. It also explains where scorpions live and what they look like; gives tips for preventing scorpion bites; and explains the symptoms of scorpion bites.
 
[course outline]
 
Description Where Scorpions Live Scorpion Sting Prevention Scorpion Sting Symptoms Minor Scorpion Sting First Aid Severe Scorpion Sting Symptoms Severe Scorpion Sting First Aid
•Describe what a scorpion looks like •Explain where in the United States scorpions live •Explain the type of areas where scorpions tend to be found •State where the only potentially fatal scorpion in the United States lives •List some tips for preventing scorpion stings •List some symptoms of mild reactions to scorpion stings •Explain proper first aid for mild scorpion stings •List some symptoms of severe reactions to scorpion stings •Explain proper first aid for severe reactions to scorpion stings 0.25 Intermediate English
First Aid – Fire Ant Bites and Stings Fire ants are aggressive ants that sometimes bite and sting. This course explains where in the U.S. fire ants are most commonly found and, within those regions, the types of areas you’re most likely to find them. It gives tips for bite/sting prevention, and discusses first aid procedures for bites and stings, including first aid for people who are allergic to the bites and stings.
 
[course outline]
 
Where Fire Ants Live Fire Ant Appearance and Behavior Fire Ant Bite Prevention Fire Ant Bite First Aid for Minor Symptoms Fire Ant Bite First Aid for Severe Symptoms Fire Ant Sting Allergies
•State where fire ants can be found in the United States •Describe fire ant appearance and behavior •List some ways to avoid being bitten and stung by fire ants •Explain proper first aid for fire ant bites and stings that cause minor symptoms •List some severe symptoms of fire ant stings •Explain proper first aid for severe fire ant sting symptoms •Explain proper first aid for people with insect sting allergies 0.25 Intermediate English
First Aid – Flying Insect Stings Flying insects, such as bees, wasps, hornets, yellow jackets, and even so-called “killer bees” are common throughout the United States. In most cases, they aren’t aggressive and they don’t seek to sting humans. However, when stings do occur, they’re typically minor and require only limited first aid. In other cases, however, especially if the person who’s stung is allergic to the sting, or if the person is stung many times, the situation can be quite severe or even potentially fatal. In this course, you’ll learn how to avoid being stung by flying insects, what to do if someone has been stung and is having a mild reaction, and what to do in the event of a severe reaction to a flying insect sting, including what to do if the stung person is allergic.
 
[course outline]
 
Flying Insects that Sting Africanized Honey Bees ("Killer Bees") Where Africanized Honey Bees Live Avoiding Stings from Flying Insects Mild Symptoms of Stings from Flying Insects First Aid for Stings from Flying Insects Allergies to Flying Insect Stings S
•List some flying insects that sting and some characteristics of the insects •Identify some ways to avoid being stung •Identify some typical symptoms of minor reactions to stings •Explain proper first aid for minor stings from flying insects •Identify some ways to know if a person is allergic to a flying insect sting •Identify some typical symptoms of major reactions to stings •Identify proper first aid for more severe reactions to flying insect stings 0.25 Intermediate English
First Aid – Tick Bites Ticks are small insects commonly found in grassy areas pretty much everywhere in the United States. They bite people and suck their blood; while doing so, they can transmit many dangerous diseases to the person they’re biting, with Lyme disease being the most notable. In this course, you’ll learn what a tick looks like and where ticks live; how to avoid being bitten by a tick; how to inspect your body for ticks; how to remove a tick from your body if you have been bitten; first aid for tick bites; symptoms of tick bites and serious reactions to tick bites; and tips for seeking medical care after a tick bite.
 
[course outline]
 
Ticks Where Ticks Live Tickborne Diseases Tick Bite Prevention Tick Inspection Tick Removal Symptoms of a Tickborne Illness Lyme Disease When to See a Doctor after a Tick Bite
•State where ticks can be found in the United States •Describe what a tick looks like •Explain where ticks are commonly found •Describe how ticks can make people sick •Explain how to avoid tick bites •Explain how to inspect yourself for ticks •Describe how to remove a tick from your body •List some symptoms of tickborne illnesses •Explain when to get additional medical assistance for a tick bite 0.25 Intermediate English
Night Shift Safety Night shift work can expose workers to a range of hazards, including sleep deprivation, limited visibility, and changing weather conditions. This course discusses what constitutes extended or unusual works shifts and the hazards associated with work pattern changes. The dangers of sleep deprivation, as well as nighttime weather hazards, are also explained along with nighttime work area lighting needs, operating mobile equipment at night, and the best practices for working outside at night.
 
[course outline]
 
Extended or Unusual Work Shifts Work Pattern Changes and Hazards Sleep Deprivation Causes and Symptoms Sleep Deprivation Prevention Nighttime Weather Hazards Outside Work Area Lighting and Visibility Operating Mobile Equipment at Night Best Practices for
•State the definition of extended and unusual work shifts •List common hazards of night shift work •Describe sleep deprivation causes, symptoms, and prevention •Describe how nighttime weather can affect working outside •List lighting needs for working outside at night •Identify best practices for working outside and operating mobile equipment during a night shift 0.25 Intermediate English
Safety Management: Emergency Action Plans This course covers the importance of creating emergency action plans in preparation for unexpected emergencies, accidents, and evacuations at industrial workplaces. Based on OSHA standards and recognized industry best practices, this course is intended as an introduction or refresher for general industry workers and those responsible for developing an emergency action plan.
 
[course outline]
 
Emergency Action Plans Alarms and Warning Systems Emergency Roles Emergency Medical Care Emergency PPE and Equipment Emergency Shelters Evacuation Routes Emergency Exits Emergency Assembly Points Emergency Training
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.38 – Emergency Action Plans
•List items in a typical emergency action plan •List types of employee roles in an emergency •List sources for medical care in an emergency •Identify different types of emergency personal protective equipment (PPE) •Describe requirements for evacuation routes, exits, and assembly points •State why emergency training is important 0.25 Intermediate English
Fire Safety Every second counts in the event of a fire. In only 30 seconds, small flames can get out of control and turn into a major fire, which can lead to an injury or a fatality. In this course, you will learn about the nature of fire, preventative and protective measures, fire sprinklers, smoke detectors, alarms, fire extinguisher use, evacuation, the stop, drop, and roll procedure, and more.
 
[course outline]
 
Minimizing Fire Danger The Nature of Fire Fire Prevention Fire Prevention at Home General Preventive Measures Protective Measures Automatic Fire Sprinklers Smoke Detectors and Heat Detectors Alarm Pull Stations Evacuation and Evacuation Procedures Fire Ex
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910 Subpart L: Fire Protection
•Identify ways the danger of fire can be eliminated or minimized •Identify and describe the elements necessary for fire •List methods of fire prevention •Describe the different fire protection methods •Describe evacuation procedures •Differentiate between the classifications of fire •Describe the rating system used for Class A and B portable fire extinguishers •List in order the steps for using a portable fire extinguisher (PASS) •Describe what to do if your or someone else's clothing catches fire 0.5 Intermediate English
Fire Extinguisher Safety We see them hanging on the wall every day but most people know very little about fire extinguishers. Use this course to educate your team on the fire tetrahedron, the types of fires that can occur in the workplace, and how and when to use a fire extinguisher. This course also describes when to evacuate and provides some proper maintenance tips for fire extinguishers.
 
[course outline]
 
How Fire Works Classifications of Fires How a Fire Extinguisher Works Types of Fire Extinguishers Water Extinguishers AFFF Carbon Dioxide Extinguishers Halon-Type or Clean Agent Dry Chemical Extinguishers Dry Powder Extinguishers Wet Chemical Extinguisher
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910.157: Portable Fire Extinguishers
•Identify and describe the elements in the fire tetrahedron •Differentiate between the classifications of fire •Describe the basics of how a fire extinguisher works •Differentiate between the types of fire extinguishers •Describe the rating system used for fire extinguishers •State when to use a fire extinguisher •List in order the steps for using a portable fire extinguisher (PASS) •State when to evacuate due to fire •Describe proper fire extinguisher maintenance 0.5 Intermediate English
Shoulder Injury Prevention In the U.S., shoulder injuries result in more days away from work than any other work-related injury. Many activities – including reaching and lifting – can strain the body and cause injuries to the back, neck, shoulders, and limbs. To prevent shoulder injuries, make sure equipment and controls are maintained and function correctly, follow safe work practices, use required PPE, don’t overexert, maintain good posture, and stretch and take breaks regularly. It is also important to exercise and take care of yourself during non-work hours.
 
[course outline]
 
Prevalence of Shoulder Injuries Shoulder Components Shoulder Injury Risk Factors Rotator Cuff Injuries Other Shoulder Injuries Injury Diagnosis and Treatments Hierarchy of Controls Engineering Controls Administrative Controls Personal Protective Equipment
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1910-900 (2015): Ergonomics Program Standard
Identify and describe the main components of a human shoulder Identify risk factors for shoulder injuries Describe the impact of shoulder injuries on the workplace Describe common shoulder injuries, including rotator cuff injuries, dislocations, sprains, strains, factures, arthritis, and frozen shoulder List common treatments for shoulder injuries Identify and describe components of the “Hierarchy of Controls” List symptoms for which you should consult a health care professional Identify methods of preventing shoulder injuries 0.5 Intermediate English
Mounting and Dismounting Heavy Equipment Accessing the operator's cab on heavy equipment requires more physical activity than sitting down into a car or small truck. "Mounting" and "dismounting" often requires the use of access supports such as ladders, steps, and handholds. This course will cover some specific safety guidelines to prevent injuries during the mounting and dismounting of heavy equipment.
 
[course outline]
 
Before Mounting Access Paths Three Points of Contact Bringing Items into/onto Heavy Equipment Additional Safety Guidelines
 
Regulations
 
29 CFR 1926.600: Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment, and Marine Operations
•Describe best practices to follow before mounting heavy equipment •Define “three points of contact” •Describe how tools and other items should be brought into or onto heavy equipment •List safety guidelines when mounting and dismounting heavy equipment 0.25 Intermediate English
Safety Management: Root Cause Analysis How many times have you thought a problem was "fixed" only to have it happen again? This happens when only the symptoms, not the underlying, or root, causes, are addressed. Root cause analysis is a generic term used to describe various methods that can be used to find and eliminate root causes so problems do not recur. This module will describe the steps involved in a root cause analysis and some tools and methods that can be used.
 
[course outline]
 
Identifying Problems for Analysis Problem Statement Problem Statement Example Cause Definitions RCA Methodologies 5 Whys Events and Causal Factors Analysis Change Analysis Barrier Analysis Task Analysis Basic Quality Tools Confirmation Bias RCA Teams
• Define root cause • Differentiate root cause, direct cause, and contributing cause • Describe the basic steps involved in root cause analysis • Identify and describe the characteristics of a good problem statement • Describe some commonly used root cause analysis tools and methods • Identify which methods work best for certain situations 0.25 Intermediate English
Safety Management: Safety Inspections and Observations Accidents are caused by unsafe workplace conditions or unsafe behaviors. Inspections and observations allow you to be proactive by evaluating how safe your workplace is instead of waiting until someone gets hurt. This course will provide an overview and general guidelines for performing safety inspections and observations.
 
[course outline]
 
Safety Inspections Overview Inspection Frequency Inspection Forms Performing an Inspection Observations Before Observing ObservingObservation Checklist Reinforcing Safe Behaviors Correct Unsafe Behaviors Observation Questions
List the two main causes of accidents Describe the purpose of safety inspections and safety observations Describe the differences between safety inspections and observations Describe how to perform safety inspections and observations List examples of what to look for while performing an inspection or observation 0.25 Intermediate English
Safety Management: Root Causes of Human Behavior Human errors occur quite frequently. To prevent recurrence of the same errors, careful analysis is required to identify and eliminate the root causes of those errors. However, determining the root causes of incidents caused by worker behaviors is typically more difficult than finding the root causes of mechanical failures. This module will describe some different models and analysis methods that can help identify root causes of human errors and behavior problems.
 
[course outline]
 
Blame System-based Approach Swiss Cheese Model of Human Error Swiss Cheese Model Failure Levels Active and Latent Failures Unsafe Acts Skill-based Errors Decision Errors Perceptual Errors Violations PreConditions for Unsafe Behaviors Supervisory Factors Inadequate Supervision Other Supervisory Factors ABC Analysis Antecedents and Consequences Using Consequences to Reinforce Behaviors Organizational Factors Root Cause Analysis Corrective Actions
• Describe the difference between looking for faults by the person or the process • List the factors that affect human behaviors • Define active and latent failures • Describe the types of human errors • Describe the conditions that cause human errors • Describe how supervisory actions and consequences affect human behaviors • Describe organizational factors that affect human behaviors • Describe general strategies for determining the root causes and implementing corrective actions for improving human behaviors 0.5 Intermediate English
Safety Management: Events and Causal Factors Analysis Accidents and major equipment failures are usually the result of several different failures or human errors occurring at the same time. This can make it difficult to analyze information and find root causes. A method such as events and causal factors analysis is useful because it organizes event data on a timeline, which provides a visual summary of an incident and makes it easy to identify relationships between relevant events and their causal factors.
 
[course outline]
 
Analysis Steps Constructing a Timeline Analyze Conditions Evaluating Human Errors Identifying Causes Evaluating Barriers
• Describe the basic steps involved in events and causal factors analysis • Describe how to construct an event timeline • List and describe the conditions that should be evaluated • Describe how to evaluate human errors 0.25 Intermediate English
Safety Management: Change Analysis Change analysis, also known as Is/Is Not Analysis or KT (Kepner Tregoe) Analytical troubleshooting, is a problem solving method that involves comparing a process that has failed or is performing poorly to one that is operating correctly. This module describes how to conduct a change analysis.
 
[course outline]
 
Change Analysis Steps Problem Description Specifying the Problem Specifying the Problem Example Problem Identifying Possible Causes Evaluating and Confirming Root Cause
• Describe the purpose of change analysis • List the steps involved with a change analysis • Describe how to conduct a change analysis 0.25 Intermediate English
Safety Management: Task Analysis When an incident, or problem, appears to have resulted from a human error during the execution of a task, or procedure, a task analysis should be performed. The objective of a task analysis is to determine how a task was actually performed, compare that to how it should have been performed, and identify corrective actions that will increase the likelihood that it will be performed correctly in the future. This module describes the steps involved and how to perform a task analysis.
 
[course outline]
 
Task Analysis Overview People Environment Actions Resources Task Analysis Steps Preliminary Information Gathering Incident Analysis Task Analysis Data Collection
• Describe the objective of a task analysis • Describe the factors that affect the performance of a task • List the steps involved with task analysis • Describe the information that should be collected during a task analysis 0.25 Intermediate English
Safety Management: Barrier Analysis Every organization has policies regarding defenses, or barriers, to control hazardous energy and prevent it from coming into contact with people, or objects. For example, machine guarding keeps people from contacting moving equipment, and lockout/tagout procedures provide barriers to prevent equipment from moving when it’s being worked on. Accidents occur when barriers fail. Barrier analysis is used to determine which barriers failed and why, so it is an effective root cause analysis tool for accidents and other incidents. This module describes how to perform a barrier analysis.
 
[course outline]
 
Barrier Types Engineering Barriers Administrative Barriers Personal Protective Equipment Layered Barriers Barrier Analysis Steps Identifying Barriers Evaluating Barriers Barrier Failures
• Describe the purpose of barriers and barrier analysis • Define the three main barrier types • Describe the effectiveness of each barrier type • List the steps involved with barrier analysis • Describe how to evaluate the performance of barriers 0.25 Intermediate English
Crane Hand Signals Clear and consistent communication between a signal person and a crane operator is essential for safe crane operation. The use of standard hand signals will ensure there are no misunderstandings between the signal person and the crane operator. This module will cover standard hand signals that can be used for most crane operations.
 
[course outline]
 
Signal Person Communication and Signals Universal Signals Stop Signals Telescoping Boom Signals Main Hoist and Whipline Signals Mobile Crane Signals Tower Crane Signals Non-Standard Signals
 
Regulations
 
OSHA 29 CFR 1926
• Describe the importance of standard hand signals for directing crane operation • Describe the role and requirements of a signal person • Demonstrate proper hand signals for standard crane operations 0.25 Intermediate English
NPDES Wastewater Discharge Permits Water is a critical resource that must be protected to supply safe drinking water and support various activities, such as farming, manufacturing, and tourism. The federal Clean Water Act (CWA) protects "waters of the United States" (WOTUS). This training provides general guidance on what waters are considered WOTUS. With certain exceptions, the CWA prohibits the discharge of pollutants from a point source into waters of the United States without a National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. The requirements of this permit are also covered in this training course.
 
[course outline]
 
Waters of the United States Tributaries Adjacent Waters Case-Specific Waters of the United States Significant Nexus Analysis Exempt Waters National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits Pollutants Classes Point Sources Exempt Discharges W
 
Regulations
 
Clean Water Act 40 CFR 122
Understand the current definition of “Waters of the United States” Describe the purpose of National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits Identify where a NPDES permit is required Describe the difference between General and Individual permits List the steps required to obtain an NPDES permit Describe NPDES permit requirements and how to comply with those requirements 0.5 Intermediate English
Pallet Jack Safety A pallet jack is a relatively simple device that allows a person to pick up and move a palletized load which can weigh several times that of the operator. A typical manual pallet jack consists of a small frame that supports two low forks that are designed to fit under a pallet. A handle, or tiller, connected to the frame provides a method to push or pull the jack, to steer it, and a way to hydraulically elevate the forks. This course will focus on the principles of operation and instructions for safe use of the manual type of pallet jack.
 
[course outline]
 
Introduction Design Preparation PPE – Steel Toe Boots PPE – Hi Vis Clothing Lifting Ergonomics Moving Non-operational Safety
• Identify the primary components of a manual pallet jack • Describe the operation of a pallet jack • List the PPE needed to safely operate a pallet jack • List actions that should be taken before operating a pallet jack • Describe how to ergonomically move a load • Describe some unsafe behaviors around pallet jacks • Describe how to safely store a pallet jack 0.25 Intermediate English
Active Shooter Response An active shooter is an individual actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill people in a confined and populated area. In many cases, active shooters use multiple firearms and there is often no pattern or method to their selection of victims. This course describes the best actions to take in an active shooter situation as well as the correct ways to interact with law enforcement officers.
 
[course outline]
 
• Mass Shootings • Active Shooter • Response • Run • Hide • Fight • Law Enforcement
• State the approximate number of mass shootings since 2010 • Describe the value of having a personal active shooter response plan • List the three major components of an active shooter response plan • Describe some of the correct ways to interact with law enforcement officers at an active shooting 0.25 Intermediate English
Strategies for Implementing NFPA 70E® Electrocution in the workplace is one of the leading causes of workplace fatalities. This course will educate qualified electrical professionals on the potential hazards of working on or around electricity, and the necessary precautions they will need to take to work safely. This course will focus on how an electric arc flash occurs, PPE protection requirements, hazards of electricity, NFPA 70E® compliance strategies and habits of safe electrical workers. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe how an electric arc flash occurs and how it can be avoided to prevent accidental injuries or death
• Discuss personal protection equipment requirements intended to help avoid accidental injuries or death
• Explain the hazards of electricity from shock and measures that may be taken to avoid accidental injuries or death
• Describe NFPA 70E® compliance strategies to help prevent shock hazards
• Identify changes to 2018 edition of NFPA 70E® intended to provide enhanced safety for those performing hazardous electrical work
1 Fundamental English
Flammable and Combustible Liquids Flammable and combustible liquids play a part in our professional environment. However, if used or stored improperly, serious fires and death may occur. This course will review the properties of flammable and combustible materials, discuss important terminology, and describe safe handling and storage practices based on NFPA 30 and OSHA 1910.106. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Discuss the properties of flammable and combustible liquids and the health and safety dangers they may present if stored or handled improperly 
• Identify the applicable codes and standards that address safe storage and handling practices of flammable and combustible liquids 
• Discuss flammable and combustible liquids concepts and identify terminology 
• Describe proper storage practices for flammable and combustible liquids to prevent fire hazards 
• Discuss safe handling practices for flammable and combustible liquids at point of final use
 
1 Intermediate English
Process Safety Management (PSM): 1910.119 Overview and Auditing The OSHA 1910.119 Process Safety Management (PSM) regulation applies to many companies that use and process flammable liquids as well as hazardous chemicals. With 14 required elements – it's a very comprehensive and challenging regulation. The PSM regulation literally changes the way affected companies run their business. This course will show you how to develop an effective PSM Program as well as survive an OSHA PSM inspection. By the end of this course, you will be able to: 
• Discuss the chemical accidents that prompted OSHA to publish the PSM standard 
• Describe the scope of the PSM standard and list the PSM standard elements 
• Explain how to implement PSM standard in a facility 
• Describe how to prepare for an OSHA PSM inspection
1 Intermediate English
Personal Protective Equipment Selection and Proper Usage Personal protective equipment (PPE) is used at nearly every worksite. OSHA's subpart I – PPE standard is very comprehensive. Not only are employers required to provide employees PPE, a documented PPE hazard assessment must be performed and employees must be properly trained on PPE use. This course will show you the proper PPE strategies, regulations, hierarchy of controls, and how to conduct a PPE Hazard Assessment. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Explain the proper PPE strategies, including performing a PPE Hazard Assessment, selecting required PPE, and training employees on PPE use 
• Identify applicable OSHA PPE regulations 
• Describe the process of performing a PPE Hazard Assessment 
• List the Hierarchy of Controls with respect to PPE
 
1 Intermediate English
Exit Routes, Emergency Action Plans & Fire Prevention Plans A safe means of escape is crucial when it’s necessary to quickly evacuate a building. This course will provide examples of some previous egress tragedies that well help you to understand critical means of egress requirements. You will learn how to develop an emergency action plan and a fire prevention plan that may be implemented in your facility so you can be ready if disaster strikes. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Discuss past egress tragedies and identify the safety flaws that contributed to each occurrence 
•  Identify critical means of egress requirements to ensure safe exit from a structure in the event of an emergency 
• Explain how to develop an emergency action plan based on OSHA 1910.38 
• Describe how to develop a fire prevention plan based on OSHA 1910.39
 
1 Fundamental English
Process Safety Management (PSM): An Overview This overview of PSM will provide a basic understanding of what PSM is and the topics that comprise it. PSM addresses Highly Hazardous Chemicals identified by OSHA and the process industries. These chemicals require safety considerations over and above normal chemicals. These safety considerations are the basis of PSM. Following course completion you will be able to identify key elements and what is and is not acceptable under PSM. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Define PSM
• Explain why PSM was enacted
• List the elements of the PSM regulatory standard
• Describe each element
• Explain ways to effectively implement PSM
1 Intermediate English
Process Safety Management (PSM): Process Hazard Analysis Process Hazards Analysis (PHA) is best described as the building block for the successful PSM program. This course provides an overview of Process Hazards Analysis, acceptable methodologies and information required for PHAs. PHAs identify, evaluate, and control the hazards involved in the process. Priority of PHAs is determined by such considerations as extent of the process hazards, number of potentially affected employees, age of the process, and operating history of the process. This course is an introduction to PHAs and does teach how to conduct a Process Hazards Analysis. At the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Define the purpose of a process hazard analysis
• List the elements contained in a process hazard analysis
• Describe at least three acceptable methods for performing a process hazard analysis
• Describe the basic requirements related to any process hazard analysis
0.5 Intermediate English
Process Safety Management (PSM): Mechanical Integrity Mechanical Integrity (MI) rivals Process Safety Information in complexity and receives the most OSHA citations. This is because MI addresses most of the equipment in a process and is therefore very broad. MI requires written procedures to maintain the integrity of process equipment and training for process overview, hazards and employee task procedures. Typically the most important task for Mechanical Integrity is equipment inspection and testing. This course offers a working knowledge of Mechanical Integrity and its many elements. At the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Define the purpose of a mechanical integrity program
• Describe the parts of a mechanical integrity program
0.5 Intermediate English
Process Safety Management (PSM): Management of Change Uncontrolled change contributes to 80% of serious industrial accidents. Management of Change (MOC) requires written procedures to manage changes to process chemicals, technology, equipment, facilities and procedures that affect a covered process. Any potential change is evaluated for its impact on the process and all affected personnel will be informed and trained in the change prior to start-up of the process. In addition, any change requires all other elements of PSM to be updated to reflect the change. Lack of or an ineffective Management of Change Program is a ticking time bomb that will eventually explode. At the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Define the purpose of management of change
• Describe when a formal management of change process is needed and when it is not needed
• List the elements contained in an effective management of change process
0.5 Intermediate English
Process Safety Management (PSM): Process Safety Information Process Safety Information (PSI) identifies the many types of information necessary to convey an understanding of a PSM covered process. Process Safety Information is typically grouped into three topics: hazards, technology and equipment. The hazards of the process must be communicated to employees. The process technology of designing safe systems, safety components and devices help employees understand the safety built into the process. The key point of Process Safety Information is not to remember it, but to know where to find the information if needed. At the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Define process safety information
• List the types of information that are considered process safety information
• Explain how process safety information is used within the broader scope of process safety management
• Describe when process safety information needs updated
0.5 Intermediate English
Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA): Hazardous Waste Training Requirements EPA hazardous waste is present at many industrial facilities. It is critical for the protection of the environment as well as maintaining EPA compliance that you are aware of RCRA hazardous waste regulations – including waste rules; generator rules; as well as RCRA training requirements. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe and list RCRA regulations and their applicability to different situations
• Identify the RCRA hazardous waste codes
• List the EPA hazardous waste generator rules
• Describe and identify the RCRA training requirements
1 Intermediate English
Corrosion Control: Transportation of Natural and Other Gases by Pipeline Effective corrosion control of natural gas as well as other gas pipelines is critical to ensure ongoing safe operation of your companies operation. This includes proper internal as well as external corrosion control. This course will review the minimum DOT pipeline corrosion control requirements.  At the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Explain atmospheric corrosion control requirements
• Select appropriate remedial measures for corrosion control in various pipelines
• List pipeline corrosion control requirements
• Summarize the scope of 49 CFR subpart I Compare and contrast external as well as internal corrosion control requirements
1 Intermediate English
Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plans Oil entering a public waterway is a serious concern. To protect our environment and ensure EPA compliance, it is imperative that you become familiar with Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) to determine if this rule applies to you, and if so, the minimum required elements of an SPCC plan.  At the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe and identify the applicability of SPCC regulation
• Identify the person who prepares the SPCC plan
• List the minimum SPCC elements
• Identify what is considered oil storage capacity
0.5 Intermediate English
Emergency Plans and Response Training for Gas Pipelines Emergency planning and response training for gas pipeline facilities are critical to ensure proper response in the event of an emergency. This course will assist you in the development of an emergency action plan to confirm you satisfy DOT requirements including required information for supervisors, training for operating personnel and effective liaison with local government agencies. At the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe and Identify a written Gas Pipeline Emergency Plan
• Identify the Minimum 49 CFR Emergency Plan Required Elements
• Describe the Information Required for Supervisors
• List and identify the Training Requirements for Operating Personnel
• List and identify the Liaison Requirements for Local Government Agencies
• Describe and identify the elements of an emergency response training program
• List the emergency procedures established under 49 CFR 195.402 and that's going to be the procedural manual for operations, maintenance, and emergencies.
• Select the likely causes of emergencies.
• Identify the steps necessary to control accidental releases of hazardous liquids or carbon dioxide.
 
1 Intermediate English
Oil Spill Responses in Facilities The environment and public health and safety are affected with every oil spill and facilities should work to mitigate their risk with a goal of zero oil discharge.  By the end of this course, you will learn about the tools facilities can use to prevent, contain, control and if necessary cleanup after an oil spill.  At the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Review applicable REGULATIONS for oil spills
• Establish inspection plans and maintenance practices to PREVENT oil spills at your facility
• PREPARE your facility for potential oil releases and establish ways to mitigate releases
• Train facility personnel to CONTAIN any releases of oil at your facility
• Facilitate proper CLEAN-UP responses to any oil spills and releases
1 Intermediate English
Benzene: Safe Handling & Storage This course will review the information required to safely handle benzene. Benzene is a flammable organic liquid that is classed as a potential human carcinogen. Training will discuss the production and use of benzene in manufacturing processes. The applicable regulatory requirements will be reviewed. The physical and chemical properties will be covered to help ensure safe handling practices. Potential exposure mechanisms, symptoms of exposure, and the use personal protective equipment are topics for consideration. The requirement for storage, handling, and transportation of benzene will be included in the training. At the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe the dangers of benzene
• Describe how exposure to benzene can affect health
• Describe who is at risk
• Describe how to reduce exposure to benzene
1 Intermediate English
Vinyl Chloride: Safe Handling & Storage This course will review the information required to safely handle vinyl chloride. Vinyl chloride is a flammable chlorinated organic liquid that can exist as an odorless gas or pressurized liquid. Vinyl chloride is classed as a potential human carcinogen. Training will discuss the production of vinyl chloride and its use in the poly vinyl chloride manufacturing process. The applicable regulatory requirements will be reviewed. The physical and chemical properties will be covered to help ensure safe handling practices. Potential exposure mechanisms, symptoms of exposure, and the use of personal protective equipment are topics for consideration. The requirement for storage, handling, and transportation of vinyl chloride will be included in the training. At the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe the dangers of vinyl chloride
• Describe how exposure to vinyl chloride can affect health
• Describe who is at risk
• Describe how to reduce exposure to vinyl chloride
1 Intermediate English
Ethylene Oxide Safety This course will introduce and describe the characteristics and uses of ethylene oxide (EtO). It will also discuss the health hazards of ethylene oxide and how to protect yourself with the use of respirators and other personal protective equipment. OSHA regulations on ethylene oxide will be reviewed and will include information on exposure limits and monitoring; compliance; medical surveillance; and communication. Recommendations on engineering controls, work practices, and emergency response will be provided. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Identify the potential hazards of Ethylene Oxide (EtO)
• Recall safe work precautions while working with EtO
• List employee training requirements
• Name the proper personal protective equipment (PPE) for EtO
• Recite the requirements contained in OSHA’s Ethylene Oxide regulation:1910.1047
1 Intermediate English
Combustible Dust – Things That Go Boom Combustible dust explosions are nothing new – recent combustible dust explosions have significantly increased awareness of this insidious hazard. However, many affected companies remain unaware their operations may involve highly explosive combustible dust. This course will review how a combustible dust explosion occurs; typical explosive dusts, as well as affected industries. Also, we will discuss safe equipment design practices as well as housekeeping and employee training requirements. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• List the elements needed to create a dust explosion 
• Describe how dust explosions occur 
• Differentiate between primary and secondary dust explosions 
• Identify the hazards of combustible dust 
• Plan dust control measures 
• List various hazard mitigations 
• Discuss combustible dust upgrades
 
1 Intermediate English
Hydrogen Sulfide Safety This course will introduce and describe the characteristics and locations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). It will discuss the health hazards of (H2S) and show you how to protect yourself with the use of respirators and proper labeling. You will learn what to do in the event of an (H2S) emergency and how to train employees on hazards, protection, and response. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Identify the potential hazards of Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S)
• Select the warning signs and symptoms of H2S exposure
• Recognize the proper personal protective equipment (PPE) for H2S
• Recall the steps to take in the event of an H2S emergency situation
1 Intermediate English
The Hazards of Oxygen and Oxygen Enrichment This course will introduce and describe the characteristics of oxygen (O2). It will discuss the health hazards of O2 and how to detect oxygen deficient and oxygen enriched atmospheres. You will learn best work practices including handling and storage. By the end of this course, you will:
• List the potential hazards of Oxygen (O2)
• Detect an O2 deficient and O2 enriched atmosphere
• Demonstrate proper handling/storage practices for O2 cylinders
• Communicate training requirements for O2
1 Intermediate English
Triethylaluminium Safety Awareness This course will introduce and describe the characteristics of Triethylaluminium (TEAL). It will discuss the health hazards of TEAL and how to reduce exposure through workplace controls as well as how to mitigate danger through safe work practices and proper PPE. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• List the potential hazards of triethylaluminium (TEAL)
• Select safe work practices for TEAL
• Recognize safe handling and storage requirements
• Recall Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) requirements
• Provide training requirements
1 Intermediate English
Nitrogen Safety Awareness Nitrogen is used daily in the workplace without incident. However, serious incidents including fatalities can occur when nitrogen is present in a work environment, such as a confined space, and employees enter without awareness of the potential hazard. This course will teach you how to recognize hazards and take corrective action to protect yourself and others. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Identify the characteristics of nitrogen 
• List the potential hazards of nitrogen
• Detect a nitrogen enriched atmosphere 
• Demonstrate proper handling/storage practices for nitrogen cylinders
 
1 Intermediate English
Safety Management Managing safety is not just something that happens – it should be managed just as quality, productivity and customer-relations are managed. Senior management establishes the overall culture at every facility. This course will review the four major elements to achieve a world class safety and health program at your facility. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Integrate safety management into your business to protect the health, safety and welfare of your employees and clients
• List the four major safety and health program elements
• Recognize unsafe conditions in a work area in order to maintain the health, safety and welfare of your employees
• Prioritize the immediate steps you can take to enhance the safety program at your facility for the health, safety, and welfare of you and your employees
1 Intermediate English
Storm Water Management: Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) Proper storm water management is critical to ensure safe drinking water for all of us. In addition, the EPA can levee substantial monetary fines as well as criminal prosecution for violators of EPA storm water regulations. This course will discuss the environmental impacts of storm water runoff, the NPDES storm water program, and the elements of a storm water pollution prevention plan. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Identify pollutant sources that may affect the quality of stormwater discharges associated with manufacturing facilities and construction activity
• Select prevention strategies for stormwater pollution
• Recall the federal requirements for stormwater runoff for manufacturing facilities and construction sites
• List who is required to get NPDES permit coverage
• Name the required element in a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan
• Match the rules and responsibilities in a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan
1 Intermediate English
Gas Pipelines – Public Awareness Gas pipeline safety is critical – not just for your employees but for public safety as well. Therefore, it is imperative that gas operators have an effective awareness program to inform the public; public officials; emergency responders; as well as excavators as to the location and safe work practices around gas pipelines and what to do in an emergency.  This course details Title 49 CFR 195.440 and will help operators of both natural gas and hazardous liquid pipelines to develop and implement public awareness programs consistent with the regulations and API RP 1162. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Implement an effective gas pipeline awareness program
• State the minimum 49 CFR 195.440 requirements
• List the American Petroleum Institute (API) Recommended Practice (RP) 1162 requirements
• Name the target audience for the gas pipeline awareness program
1 Intermediate English
Hazmat Transportation Safety Awareness Most people think of hazardous chemicals/materials as merely compliance with the OSHA Hazard Communication standard. However, if your employees ship, receive, or are otherwise involved (e.g., ordering, preparing shipping papers) with DOT hazardous materials they must be trained appropriately as a DOT HAZMAT employee. This course will discuss Hazardous Materials Regulations, introduce the Hazardous Material Table, and show you how to prepare shipping papers and correctly label hazardous material. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Summarize the applicability of DOT HAZMAT regulations
• Identify DOT Hazardous material
• Correctly read the Hazardous Materials Table
• Recall shipping paper requirements
• Mark materials with the correct labeling/placard
• Provide the proper response in an emergency
1 Fundamental English
R & D Waste Management This course is structured to provide a general overview of waste streams that can be generated in a research and development (R & D) laboratory. Information is also provided concerning the federal regulatory agencies that oversee chemical waste in a research laboratory setting and applicable guidance from those agencies.
 
In this interactive online course, you will learn that no matter how big or small your research laboratory, you should have a chemical hygiene plan in place to protect all laboratory personnel while they collect and handle hazardous wastes. The handling of hazardous wastes can present a physical and health hazard to laboratory workers in clinical, industrial and academic laboratories. This course will provide guidance on good work practices in the handling of the various wastes streams generated in a R & D laboratory.
 
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

• Review applicable regulations for handling laboratory waste streams
• Provide details on characterizing hazardous wastes
• Discuss guidelines for handling chemical wastes
• Review additional waste streams
• Summarize biological wastes

1 Intermediate English
R & D Chemical Hygiene Significant injures, damage to facilities and disruption of work can occur when chemicals are not properly stored and handled.  By the end of this course, you will learn about the hazards of working with chemicals in a Research and Development Laboratory.  By the end of this course, you will be able to:

• Review applicable REGULATIONS for chemical hygiene
• Discuss guidelines for handling hazardous chemicals
• Develop chemical spill control procedures for your facility
• Review the revised Hazard Communication Standard
• Discuss chemical storage and compatibility
• Develop chemical waste guidelines for your facility

1 Intermediate English
Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – What You Don't Know Can Kill You! Welcome to Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – What You Don’t Know Can Kill You!
 
In this course we will cover the safety aspects of fuel and combustion systems. We will explore the gaps in the knowledge of people responsible for system safety. You will get instruction in developing safe environments, codes and standards, and the organizations that publish the codes. We will also review risk assessment and the insurance industry. You’ll also receive information on the possibility of personal criminal liability. Throughout the course you will be given real-life stories and the lessons learned from them.
 
Posted by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved.
At the end of this course you will be able to:

• Discuss the safety requirements of fuel systems and combustion equipment
• Explain code and standard structuring to ensure safe fuel systems and equipment for building occupants
• Identify the publications to reference in order to comply with the requirements for facility occupant welfare
• Describe ways to assess and minimize risk in the systems and equipment that provide healthy environments

1 Intermediate English
Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Combustion Basics Welcome to Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Combustion Basics.
 
In this course we lay a foundation for more complete technical understanding of fuel systems and combustion equipment. If you’ve been associated with this world, there may be little here that is new. If not, this is a course you may refer to over and over again in your career. The information in this course is out there in many forms and places.
 
We will define combustion, review fuels, and explore the fire triangle. You’ll get combustion chemistry and how to apply it to burner systems. We’ll delve into environmental emission issues, basic burner design issues, and draft systems. We’ll cover flames and instruct you in where to look and what to look for as well as fuel/air ratios evaluations. Throughout the course you will be given real-life stories so that you can see the practical applications for what you are learning.
 
Posted by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved.
At the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Label the fire triangle and explain its importance in providing healthy environments
• Discuss combustion chemistry and how it applies to designing safe, reliable burner systems in occupied buildings
• Identify flame color, shape, symmetry, and stability to evaluate and mitigate risk in any facility
• Describe potential hazards and how to eliminate them or reduce their effects on building occupants
2 Intermediate English
Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Natural Gas Piping Basics Welcome to Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Natural Gas Piping Basics.
 
Combustion systems start with fuel systems and fuel systems start with piping. By far the most common fuel burned throughout the world is natural gas. Natural gas use is growing even more in popularity as the United States develops shale gas deposits. For this reason the primary focus of this course is piping related to natural gas systems.

Before we discuss advanced gas piping concepts it’s important to review the basics. In this course we attempt to discuss the most basic natural gas related piping concepts starting with the piping itself, how it’s made, and how it’s installed.
 
Posted by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved.

At the end of this course you will be able to:
• Identify the codes and standards that apply to natural gas piping
• List the pipe joining methods used for steel gas piping systems
• Describe the types of manual shutoff isolation valves installed in fuel systems
• List the nondestructive techniques used in weld integrity testing
1 Intermediate English
Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Gas Supply System Issues Welcome to Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Gas Supply System Issues.
 
Once natural gas piping is inside a facility, it is pretty easy to look up, see it marked, and understand what it is. Many people don’t quite understand how the gas might have gotten there. It’s important to know where the gas came from, who owned it and at what point, how the pressure got controlled, and how to shut it all off if necessary. In this course we also discuss alternative fuel considerations, such as propane, landfill, or digester gas service issues. Throughout the course you will be given real-life stories and the lessons learned from them.
 
Posted by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved.
At the end of this course you will be able to:
• Outline the gas flow of a typical gas transmission delivery piping system
• Identify the mercaptan concentration threshold requirements for gas odorization
• List the conditions to consider when conducting a gas piping risk survey
• Define digester and landfill gas supplies
1 Intermediate English
Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Gas Piping Repairs and Cleaning Welcome to Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Gas Piping Repairs and Cleaning.
 
In this course we provide advanced concepts for facilitating the safe repair and cleaning of gas piping systems. Some of the most significant and horrific tragedies have come about from mistakes made in preparing gas piping for maintenance, bringing gas piping back into service, and trying to clean gas lines. The concepts presented in this course need to be made the subject of policies and practices with both designers and maintenance staffs. A section at the end of this course highlights a relatively new standard, NFPA 56, Standard for Fire and Explosion Prevention During Cleaning and Purging of Flammable Gas Piping Systems, which is central to this topic. It took many months of meetings with contributions from over a dozen experts to write NFPA 56. This is a very important and ground breaking piece of work that applies directly too many of the concepts presented in this course. Anyone who does or oversees activities related to gas line repairs and cleaning must become familiar with this standard. This course is not a design guide or a “how to” for gas line purging and cleaning. Each site and its circumstances and conditions are different, and nothing here should be seen as a replacement for sound engineering judgment and the requirements prescribed by applicable codes. Throughout the course Subject Matter Expert John R. Puskar will provide real-life stories and the lessons learned from them.
 
Posted by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved. 
At the end of this course you will be able to:
• List the six key steps to conducting gas piping repairs safely
• Identify the three most popular purge processes
• Describe the gas sampling safety protocol Identify the delivery methods used to get nitrogen to a site for the use of purging
• Describe the key considerations intended to minimize contamination
• Name the pig types that are commonly used directly in support of cleaning processes
• Identify key issues related to NFPA 54 and NFPA 56 standards
• List the matters that must be addressed in the written procedures for each cleaning and purging activity
2 Intermediate English
Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Understanding Fuel Trains and Combustion Equipment Welcome to Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Understanding Fuel Trains and Combustion Equipment.
 
Previous courses in the series have covered combustion and gas piping basics. In this course we discuss how combustion equipment is configured, how fuel trains function, the purpose and design of components, and how these components and systems work together, as shown here. We also discuss how typical burner light-offs occur along with how fuel/air ratios are controlled.
 
Posted by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved.
At the end of this course you will be able to:
• Recall and describe the fuel train components
• Relate the four key fuel train safety functions
• Describe the pilot control systems and the four most common fuel/air ratio and capacity control systems
• Discuss the oil firing systems, including fuel oils, fuel oil supply systems, and oil ignition systems and burners
• Recall and describe the categories of fuel-fired heat processing equipment
2 Intermediate English
Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Understanding Boilers and Their Special Risks Welcome to Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Understanding Boilers and Their Special Risks.
 
The potential for catastrophes is much greater for boilers than for any other category of combustion equipment, because there is a twofold risk, fuels and saturated water/steam. Heating water in boilers or hot water heaters, is by far the single biggest application of heat energy and fuel trains on the planet. In the United States alone, a 2005 study indicated that there are over 163,000 commercial and industrial boilers. There are millions of residential boilers and hot water heaters as well. In this course we describe different boiler types and also provide insights into some of the hazards associated with steam systems, including safety relief valves and steam piping. Throughout the course Subject Matter Expert John R. Puskar will provide real-life stories and the lessons learned from them.
 
Posted by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved. 
 
At the end of this course you will be able to:
• List the different boiler types
• Match the correct type of water gage glasses to use based on maximum psi capacity
• Describe what you can review to make sure your gage glass systems are functioning properly
• List the five most common safety relief valve defect issues
• Identify key hazards associated with steam piping
1 Intermediate English
Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Controlling Combustion Risks: People Welcome to Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Controlling Combustion Risks: People. 
 
This course focuses on one of the three key concepts found to form the basis of long-term sustainable fuel and combustion system safety: people, policies, and equipment. These are the three legs of a three-legged safety and risk management approach. Any successful program must contain elements of each to be successful. The “people” piece involving controlling human error is among the most important. Human error has been the leading cause of many fuel and combustion system accidents.
 
Posted by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved.
At the end of this course you will be able to:
• Identify human error factors that lead to operations and maintenance issues and disasters
• Explain the impact of and methods involved in the planning, application, and validation of training
• Describe the incident response cycle and how it is impacted by sustainability and company culture
• Relate the concept of layers of protection analysis as a classical means of providing protection from hazards
• Explain why contractors for fuels and combustion equipment need to be qualified, assessed, and validated
1 Intermediate English
Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Controlling Combustion Risks: Policies Welcome to Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Controlling Combustion Risks: Policies.

 
There comes a time in the life of a fuels and combustion equipment safety and risk management program when thought must be provided to make things sustainable. The immediate fixes must become institutionalized. Knowledge-based practices need to become rule based. In this course 10 important concepts are summarized, reinforced, and framed in an approach for developing sustainable policies.

 

Posted by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved.

At the end of this course you will be able to:
• Describe the consequences of not having detailed and relevant fuel and combustion system specifications for purchasing, installation, and inspection of equipment
• Explain the importance of having an equipment-specific process for combustion equipment lockout, tagout, and blind installation
• Relate how interlock and safety testing of fuel trains and devices and equipment upgrades can help keep you safety compliant with current nationally recognized codes and standards
• Discuss why detailed startup/shutdown procedures are important and briefly explain generic elements of a prestart walk-down
• Describe the importance of validating competence, through training and experience, of both vendors and employees who interface with fuels and combustion systems
• List the basic points to consider when writing a procedure or specifications for burner tuning (fuel/air ratio adjustment)
2 Intermediate English
Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Controlling Combustion Risks: Equipment Welcome to Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Controlling Combustion Risks: Equipment
 
It’s intuitive that controlling equipment risks involves regular safety testing and maintenance of equipment. However, much of the safety and risk management of fuel-fired equipment needs to occur in the design and specification of equipment, along with its installation and commissioning. In this course we address these issues as well as ongoing safety device testing requirements. Throughout the course you will be given real-life stories and the lessons learned from them.
 
Posted by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved.
At the end of this course you will be able to:
• Discuss how to control equipment risk through regular safety testing and maintenance of equipment
• Describe the safety standards and tests used for safety interlock devices
• Identify the different Flame Detectors used to establish whether or not a flame exists
• List the commonly used fuel valves that are used on fuel trains
• Discuss the safety requirements involved in conducting a plug valve maintenance program
1 Intermediate English
Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Global Perspective on Fuel and Combustion System Risks Welcome to Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety: Global Perspective on Fuel and Combustion System Risks.
 
It’s a big world out there and combustion equipment is everywhere. You can learn a lot by seeing what the state of the art is and is not in both developed and developing countries. This course provides insights from such experiences. You will see the good, the bad, and the ugly so that you can take advantage of them all without the pain that others have experienced to gain this knowledge. This course is especially important if you operate equipment in developing countries. This can be an entirely different experience and one that requires considerable thought about fuel choices, installation issues, and training of staff. To be successful your focus has to be on simplicity. Real-life stories in this course communicate this clearly. Don’t be fooled by the title of the course. There’s information here that applies for equipment operated anywhere.
 
Posted by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved.
At the end of this course you will be able to:
 
• Describe the European Committee for Standardization (CEN) role related to standards and specifications in Europe and list at least two other international standards organizations
• Relate the three important questions you should ask before starting a project in a developing country
• Explain why you may benefit from keeping things simple in developing countries as opposed to using the most efficient technology available
• List at least three challenges related to creating training for facilities in developing countries
• Cite at least four examples of great technologies that are moving their way into the U.S. marketplace
1 Intermediate English
Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Business Contingency Planning Welcome to Fuel and Combustion Systems Safety – Business Contingency Planning.

Everything presented in this course is focused on helping you to reduce the probability and severity of a fuel or combustion system accident. However, nothing can bring all of this to zero risk. For example, there will always be things beyond your control, such as weather events. This course will help you to respond in an effective and timely manner and to know something about what to expect should there be an incident at your facility.

 
Posted by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved.

At the end of this course you will be able to:

• Explain factors related to fuel systems and combustion equipment that should be considered when it comes to business contingency planning
• Describe sparing philosophy and spare capacity and list components you should consider in planning spare parts needs and why commonality is integral
• Relate ideas for making fuel and combustion systems more robust toward flooding incidents through design and installation and recovery more rapid and secure
• Discuss investigation issues that can occur when your facility has an incident and how you should plan for them
• List the five key items you should implement immediately at your facility to help maintain safe fuel and combustion systems
 

1 Intermediate English
Process Safety Management (PSM): Employee Participation The Union Carbide explosions in Bhopal India, 1984 and Institute, West Virginia in 1985. The Phillips Petroleum explosion in 1989, and ARCO explosion in 1990. These are just four major incidents that led to the OSHA Process Safety Management Standards.

Process Safety Management (PSM) is aimed at preventing highly hazardous chemicals from being released. The employee participation element is a critical part of PSM that enhances overall effectiveness in areas including Process Hazard Analysis (PHA) and Incident Investigation. In this interactive online video course, learn from industry expert Jon Wallace about the employee participation component of the Process Safety Management Standards. Subjects covered include employer requirements for a written plan of action to confirm employee participation, consultation with employees regarding hazards, and employee access to process hazard analysis. Employers must follow OSHA regulations and ensure employee participation and EPA Clean Air Act Amendments are implemented in training.

By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe the importance of employee participation as part of the overall process safety management program
• Recognize OSHA 1910.119 employee participation requirements
• Outline steps on how to incorporate participation into your overall process safety management program
• Measure compliance with employee participation requirements
0.5 Intermediate English
Process Safety Management (PSM): Operating Procedures Methyl isocyanide, aldicarb oxime, anhydrous ammonia. These are just three examples of highly toxic chemicals that have been released into the atmosphere as a result of chemical plant explosions in recent years. Exposure to highly hazardous chemicals can be fatal; therefore, Process Safety Management (PSM) was designed to help prevent such chemicals from being released. PSM outlines steps for the management of hazards associated with processes using highly hazardous chemicals.

Because most PSM covered processes are complex operations, the need for clear operating procedures is critical in order to maintain a safe and healthy work environment. In this interactive online video course, industry expert Jon Wallace discusses the required elements for operating procedures, including steps for each operating phase, operating limits, and safety and health considerations. A solid understanding of this information will help ensure employers are in compliance with OSHA PSM regulations.

By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Identify the importance of operating procedures as part of overall PSM program; 
• List OSHA 1910.119 operating procedures requirements; 
• Define how to incorporate operating procedures into your overall PSM program; 
• Determine compliance with operating procedures requirements.
 
1 Intermediate English
Process Safety Management (PSM): Training On January 31, 2006, an explosion caused by a runaway chemical reaction rocked the Synthron facility in Morganton, North Carolina. One worker was fatally burned, and 14 others were injured (two seriously). The explosion destroyed the facility and damaged structures in the nearby community. Incident investigation revealed that Synthron had minimal safety information on its chemical processes, and personnel were poorly prepared to recognize dangers from an uncontrolled chemical reaction.
 
Process Safety Management (PSM) is aimed at preventing highly hazardous chemicals from being released, and effective training is needed to ensure the safe operation of oftentimes complex operations. In this interactive online video course, industry expert Jon Wallace discusses the elements of the PSM Training requirement, including initial training, refresher training, and training documentation. A solid understanding of the details of this requirement will help ensure employers are in compliance with OSHA PSM regulations.
By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe the importance of training as part of the overall PSM program
• List the OSHA 1910.119 training requirements
• Identify how to incorporate effective training into your overall PSM program
• Measure compliance with PSM training requirements
1 Intermediate English
Process Safety Management (PSM): Contractors On October 23, 1989, an explosion occurred at the Phillips Petroleum polyethylene plant in Pasadena, Texas. A massive vapor cloud was created causing 23 fatalities and over 100 injuries. Investigation into the incident revealed that a specialist maintenance contractor employed to do work on one of the reactors did not follow the proper procedures prior to maintenance work.

Process Safety Management (PSM) is a systematic process aimed at preventing highly hazardous chemicals from being released. Because contractors perform crucial activities on PSM covered processes, unsafe contractor work may jeopardize other employees as well as the contractors themselves. In this interactive online video course, safety expert Jon Wallace discusses the elements of the PSM Contractor requirement, including contractor selection, training, and evaluation. It is critical that contractors understand potential hazards of their work environment; therefore, a solid understanding of the PSM Contractor requirement will help ensure employers correctly train contractors on OSHA regulations.

By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe the importance of contractor safety as part of overall PSM program
• List OSHA 1910.119 contractor safety requirements
• Identify how to implement contractor safety into your overall PSM program
• Measure compliance with PSM contractor requirements
1 Intermediate English
Process Safety Management (PSM): Pre-Startup Safety Review On August 28, 2008, an explosion at the Bayer CropScience plant in Charleston, West Virginia killed two workers and injured eight others. The ignition of a five-thousand pound chemical vat occurred during the restart of the methomyl unit after upgrades were performed on the system. Incident investigation revealed several causes, including inadequate pre-startup safety review, and inadequate operator training on the new system.

This is an example of the importance of Process Safety Management (PSM). PSM is aimed at preventing highly hazardous chemicals from being released, and startup and shutdown are potentially the two most dangerous times for a PSM process. In this interactive online video course, safety expert Jon Wallace discusses the components of the PSM Pre-Startup Safety Review. The purpose of this review is to ensure safe operation of a PSM covered process by identifying and correcting unsafe conditions prior to process operation.

By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe the importance of pre-startup safety review (PSSR) as part of overall PSM program
• Understand OSHA 1910.119 pre-startup safety review requirements
• Understand how to implement pre-startup safety into your overall PSM program
• Evaluate compliance with pre-startup safety review requirements
1 Intermediate English
Process Safety Management (PSM): Hot Work Permits In January 2008 there was a fire at the Monte Carlo Resort and Casino in Paradise, Nevada. Welders at the time did not use fire protection mats, and the resulting fire caused 100 million dollars in damage, with thirteen people suffering from smoke inhalation and seventeen people suffering from minor injuries. This could have been prevented with an effective Project Safety Management Hot Work Permit Program.
Process Safety Management (PSM) is a systematic process aimed at preventing highly hazardous chemicals from being released. The Hot Work Permit Program is one of the fundamental components of occupational safety. Hot Works is geared towards any work that produces sparks or flames, and can includes welding and cutting among potential ignition sources. In this interactive online video course, safety expert Jon Wallace discusses the components of an effective Hot Work Permit program, how to implement it, and how it can prevent property damage, and loss of life. An effective Hot Works Permit Program will also help avoid OSHA violations.
By the end of this course you will be able to: 
• Describe the importance of an effective hot work  program as part of overall PSM program;
• List OSHA 1910.119 hot work program requirements;
•  Identify how to implement a hot work program into your overall PSM program;
• Measure compliance with hot work program requirements
1 Intermediate English
Process Safety Management (PSM): Incident Investigations There have been many incidents involving multiple losses of life that led to the formation of the OSHA Process Safety Management Standard. Learning from past incidents and investigating the root causes of these incidents can help us be prepared and prevent history from repeating itself. In this interactive online video course, you will learn from industry expert Jon Wallace (25 year safety veteran) about the importance of incident investigation as part of the process safety management program. You will also learn about incident investigation requirements, and how to implement an incident investigation program into your overall process safety management program. By the end of this course, you're going be able to:
• Describe the importance of incident investigation as part of your overall process safety management program
• List OSHA 1910.119 Incident Investigation Requirements
• Identify how to implement an incident investigation program into your overall process safety management program
• Measure compliance with incident investigation requirements
1 Intermediate English
Process Safety Management (PSM): Emergency Planning & Response Proper training and preplanning is an essential part of an emergency action plan and can help prevent disasters from occurring. In this interactive online video course, you will learn from industry expert Jon Wallace (25 year safety veteran) about the importance of emergency planning and response as part of the overall process safety management program. You will also learn about emergency planning and response requirements and how to implement emergency planning and response into your overall process safety management program. By the end of this course, you're going be able to:
• Describe the importance of emerging planning emergency planning and response as part of the overall PSM program
• List OSHA 1910.119 emergency planning and response requirements
• Identify how to implement emergency planning and response into your overall PSM program
• Measure compliance with the emergency planning and response requirements
1 Intermediate English
Process Safety Management (PSM): Compliance Audits Compliance audits serve as a self-evaluation for employers to measure the effectiveness of their process safety management system. Audits can identify problem areas and assist employers in directing attention to process safety management weaknesses. In this interactive online video course, you will learn from industry expert Jon Wallace (25 year safety veteran) about the importance of compliance audits as part of the overall process safety management program. You will also learn how to implement compliance audits into your overall process safety management program and how to evaluate compliance with process safety management compliance audit requirements. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe the importance of compliance audits as part of the overall process safety management program
• List OSHA 1910.119 Compliance Audit Requirements
• Identify how to implement compliance audits into your overall process safety management program
• Measure compliance with process safety management compliance audit requirements
1 Intermediate English
Process Safety Management (PSM): Trade Secrets There are companies that have millions of dollars in trade secrets and making that information accessible to competitors or the general public can have a significant effect on their competitive advantage. In this interactive online video course, you will learn from industry expert Jon Wallace (25 year safety veteran) about trade secret requirements outlined in the process safely management standard. You will also learn about your company’s rights and responsibilities with respect to company trade secrets and OSHA’s rights and responsibilities to access trade secret information. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe the trade secrets requirements outlined in the PSM standard
• Identify your company's rights and responsibilities with respect to company trade secrets
• List OSHA's rights and responsibilities to access trade secret information
• List why trade secrets are part of the PSM standard
0.5 Intermediate English
Unstable, Reactive, and Energetic Compounds Chemical reactions are part of our daily lives. From cooking in the kitchen, to driving a car, to handling chemicals at your workplace, these reactions are commonplace. Dangerously reactive liquids and solids can be extremely hazardous. Accidental or uncontrolled chemical reactions are important causes of severe personal injury and property damage.  Unstable, Reactive, and Energetic Compounds course will explain the basic terminology relating to chemical hazard classes and reactivity.  By the end of this course you will be able to:
• Identify current CSB and OSHA regulatory oversight due to recent accidents.
• Describe a Job Hazard Assessment (JHA) and ways this tool can be used to identify hazards, evaluate risks, and take the necessary actions to eliminate hazards.
• Explain the 16 sections of Safety Data Sheets as they pertain to these chemicals.
• Recognize the specific chemicals/classes that constitute these types of compounds, identify their hazards, evaluate risks, and eliminate the hazards
0.5 Intermediate English
Incident Reporting and Investigation Anytime your company has an accident, it could affect your workers compensation cost, regulatory compliance, and profits. An incident investigation can help you find the root cause of an accident and help prevent future accidents from happening. This interactive online course will teach you how to organize and implement an incident investigation. Additionally you will learn how you can determine the root cause of an incident. You will also learn about OSHA’s recordkeeping rules. By the end of this course, you will be able to: 
• Describe the difference between an accident and incident
• Identify OSHA recordkeeping rules
• Describe the three causes of an incident
• Identify resources available for incident investigation
 
1 Intermediate English
DOT Drug and Alcohol Testing In this interactive online course, we will explore what is required from DOT regarding drug and alcohol testing. You will explore the various roles and responsibilities for employees and employers. Furthermore, we will discuss the requirements for a safety-sensitive employee. By the end of this course, you will be able to:

• Define what is a DOT safety sensitive function
• Describe when DOT alcohol testing is required
• Specify how prescribed medication and over the counter medication fit into the testing program
• Define responsibilities of employers and employees in regards to DOT drug and alcohol testing

 

1 Intermediate English
RCRA Emergency Response Being unprepared for an emergency response situation at your facility could result in injury or loss of life. This interactive online course will teach you about emergency response for entities that are covered by existing RCRA standards. Additionally you will learn the different tools you can use to help get through an emergency response situation. You will also learn how emergency plans can fit into current integrated contingency plans or be used as a standalone resource. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Determine what is required for RCRA emergency response planning as stated in the regulations
• Determine ways to assess a facilities compliance efforts for RCRA emergency planning
• Determine what is needed in a site specific RCRA emergency plan
• Describe emergency response efforts across organizational internal and external stakeholders
 
1 Intermediate English
EHS Regulatory Overview Violating Environmental, Health and Safety regulations can result in fines and even the closure of your business. This interactive online course will teach you the major regulations for general industry as it pertains to Environmental, Health and Safety. You will learn how to determine which regulations are relevant to your companies and/or industry. You will also learn what your organization can do to maintain regulatory compliance with EHS regulations. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe the necessary skills to locate and find the Environmental, Health and Safety regulations
• Describe how to monitor regulatory compliance for Environmental, Health and Safety
• Summarize and describe the major tenants of Environmental, Health and Safety regulations
• Describe the regulatory standards that governs industry from an Environmental, Health and Safety perspective
 
1 Intermediate English
Hand Safety Unprotected hands can result in severe burns, cuts, punctures, and loss of fingers. This interactive online course will teach you ways to increase hand safety through the use of workplace assessments and the identification of hazardous environments. You will also learn how to select the proper type of glove for the hazard you might encounter. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe the importance of hand safety in the workplace environment
• Determine when it is necessary to wear gloves relative to an identification process of tasks needed to be performed
• Identify opportunities in which it is important to protect hands from harmful extreme temperature conditions, toxic substances, burns and lacerations
• Identify proper techniques needed to pick out the proper types of gloves based on the hazards and conditions identified through an assessment process
 
1 Intermediate English
Lockout/Tagout Accidents can happen anytime and anywhere and can result in equipment damage, personal injury, or even death. A potential, but preventable, cause of accidents is failing to properly isolate equipment before servicing or maintaining it. Ensuring that equipment is safe to work on is critical as uncontrolled hazardous energy cause unexpected startups or releases of stored energy that can be hazardous to workers.
 
In this interactive online course we will discuss hazardous energy. We will review OSHA lockout/tagout standards and procedures, and describe employee training and inspections necessary for an energy control program.
By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• List types of energy sources
• Define the term hazardous energy
• Compare active energy and residual energy
• Discuss the purpose and scope of OSHA’s lockout/tagout standards
• Describe the components of an energy control program
• Compare lockout procedures and tagout procedures
• Describe the characteristics of lockout devices and tagout devices
• Describe employee training and inspections necessary for an energy control program
• Identify the basic steps of applying energy controls
• Identify the basic steps for releasing equipment from lockout/tagout
• Discuss special situations that can occur during lockout/tagout
0.5 Intermediate English
Basic Electrical Safety A good understanding of electrical safety can help prevent accidents on the job. Workers must be aware of electrical hazards and be familiar with the protective devices in electrical systems, as well as the safety practices that help prevent injuries and equipment damage.
 
In this interactive online course, you will learn to identify the basic aspects of working safely, such as identifying electrical parts, determining nominal voltages, and understanding minimum safe clearance distances. You will also learn the actions to take if electrical shock or another injury occurs.
By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Discuss the factors that affect the severity of an electrical shock
• Discuss the actions to be taken in the event of an electrical shock
• Discuss the different types of insulating gear that are available for use
• Discuss the lockout and tagout systems
• Discuss grounding for tools and double insulating of tools
• Discuss three basic aspects of working safely: identifying electrical parts, determining nominal voltages, and knowing the minimum safe clearance distances
0.5 Intermediate English
Electrical Safety Safety is especially important for anyone who works around electricity. Even though electricity cannot be seen, it can be extremely hazardous unless the proper precautions are taken.
 
This interactive online course covers basic electrical concepts, such as electrical qualities of current, voltage, and resistance. Hazards associated with electricity, including electrical shock will be discussed, as well as the actions workers can take to protect themselves from those hazards.
By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe the basic electrical qualities of current, voltage, and resistance
• State what an electrical shock is
• Describe factors that affect the severity of an electrical shock
• Describe the physical effects of current passing through the human body
• Describe hazards associated with working near electrical equipment
• Describe ways of providing protection to personnel from hazards associated with electricity
• Describe how to safely give aid to an electrical shock victim
• Describe how to safely respond to an electrical fire
0.5 Intermediate English
Ladder Safety How much training have you had to use, store, and maintain a ladder properly to prevent falls and injuries? Working on ladders is a necessary part of most jobs in construction, maritime, and general industry. However, the use and care of ladders are not always as easy as it appears for the worker. Training is necessary to know the tolerances of the ladder, its safety features, and how to use the ladder. There have been many reported deaths and serious injuries from improper ladder use such as falls, electrocutions, and slips. This interactive online course will give you the information needed to be aware of the hazards related to ladders and best practices for using ladders. At the end of this course, you will be able to:

• Describe the importance of ladder safety
• Identify common causes of ladder accidents
• Discuss proper labeling of ladders
• Analyze how to ascend, descend, and work on ladders safely
• Explain how to maintain, store, and transport ladders properly
• Evaluate the OSHA regulations for ladder safety

0.5 Intermediate English
Asbestos Awareness in General Industry Prolonged exposure to asbestos can cause long-term health effects, even death. So what is asbestos? This interactive, online course covers asbestos awareness as part of your Health, Safety, and Environmental (HSE) training platform. Topics include asbestos awareness and health risks, company and personal responsibilities, and what to do if asbestos is found. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
Explain what asbestos is and list the three most common names of asbestos types
Describe when asbestos is a health risk and possible illnesses that may result
Recall three common building asbestos-containing materials (ACMs) and define the terms non-friable ACM and friable ACM
Describe your company’s responsibilities, related to asbestos
List the steps to follow if you suspect ACMs or presumed asbestos-containing materials (PACMs) and identify prohibited activities with ACMs
List the four classifications of asbestos work
Describe the additional health risk smokers have if they work with ACMs or PACMs and tips for smoking cessation to reduce the risk of work-related illnesses
0.5 Intermediate English
Safe Lifting Do you know the best ways to prevent injuries associated with handling materials? Job tasks involving materials handling must be assessed to eliminate or minimize potential hazard exposure. Safe manual material handling is a continuous process that involves three reoccurring stages to be successful: Identification of the risks of all manual handling tasks, assessment of the likelihood of injury, and control of the risk through work design, use of appropriate mechanical aids, and the provision of training and information to supervisors and employees. At the end of this course, you will be able to:

• Identify manual material handling injuries & their root causes
• Explain proper lifting techniques
• Discuss when to seek help and use mechanical aids
• List minimum PPE requirements for manual handling of materials
• Describe mitigating hazards in storage areas

0.5 Intermediate English
Heat Safety Awareness During the summer months, people working outdoors or hot warehouses are at an increased risk for heat-related illnesses. Heat-related illnesses can be very dangerous and may present themselves in many different forms. This course will identify the symptoms and complications of these types of illnesses, and discuss methods of treatment and prevention. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe the heat index and the heat illness equation
• Identify the causes of heat-related illnesses
• Describe the different levels of heat illness, recognize the symptoms, and describe treatment and prevention methods
• Identify control measures to lessen the risk of heat stress
• Discuss employee and supervisor responsibilities regarding safety and health when working in hot environments
• Explain how to prevent heat illness at home
• Identify the dangers of sun exposure
• Explain ways to prevent and control illness related to sun exposure
0.5 Intermediate English
Bloodborne Pathogens Bloodborne pathogens are pathogenic microorganisms present in blood that are capable of causing disease in humans. Workers in certain occupations, especially those that work in healthcare, have a potential to be exposed to bloodborne pathogens or other potentially infectious materials (OPIMs), so it is important to understand the dangers of these pathogens and precautions to take to avoid exposure.

In this interactive, online course, we will discuss methods to prevent or reduce exposure to bloodborne pathogens. We will discuss signs, labels, and color-coding of bloodborne pathogens. We will talk about the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), in addition to removal, handling, decontamination and disposal of PPE. We will discuss the occupational reasons for getting Hepatitis B vaccine and how it is administered. We will review appropriate actions to take and persons to contact in case of emergency involving blood or other potentially infectious materials, and cover procedures to follow if an exposure incident occurs.

By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Define “bloodborne pathogen”
• Identify the different types of bloodborne pathogens
• Discuss how to evaluate the safety and health risks of bloodborne pathogens
• Identify the causes and modes of transmission for bloodborne pathogens
• Identify methods of exposure controls for bloodborne pathogens
• Discuss the elements of an effective written exposure control plan
• Describe what is meant by “universal precautions”
0.5 Intermediate English
Lead Safety Awareness The U.S. worker is exposed to lead through a variety of occupational tasks and locations. When lead enters the body it creates an elevated blood lead level (BLL), which can affect the kidneys, liver, nervous system, and cause other damage. This interactive online course presents lead regulations you should know, as well as important information about exposure control and testing and lead abatement. By the end of this course you will be able to:
• Describe lead and its dangers
• Identify where lead exposures are in the workplace
• Identify how to test for lead levels in materials
• Discuss the OSHA requirements related to medical monitoring and medical removal
0.5 Intermediate English
Legionella Prevention and Control In 1977, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) identified a condition known as Legionella pneumophila, which is a waterborne disease responsible for 34 deaths at an American Legion convention in Philadelphia. This interactive online course presents the causes and risk factors for Legionella contamination and some of the problems associated with Legionella in water systems in commercial buildings. Other topics include the ANSI/ASHRAE 188-2015 Standard and testing methodology and frequency. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Define legionella, its causes and risk factors
• Discuss the ANSI/ASHRAE 188-2015 Standard
• Review water management for buildings to prevent outbreaks
• Describe testing methodology and frequency
0.5 Intermediate English
Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) Safety Task Review Why are safe task analyses and job hazard analyses important for employees? Employees sometimes move about their facility without fully understanding the hazards they may be exposed to. This interactive online course teaches the importance of having a safe plan in place that includes the type of equipment you wear, the kind of facility that you may be in, the hazards that are present—whether they be physical or chemical—or any additional hazard that may present itself. By the end of this course you will be able to:
• Describe the elements of safe task planning
• Summarize the requirements for an effective job hazard analysis
• Explain how to use the safety task analysis form
• Discuss how to analyze risk using a risk matrix
• List the benefits of a job hazard analysis
• Explain the steps in performing a job hazard analysis
0.5 Intermediate English
Safety for Office Personnel What do office personnel need to know in order to stay safe at work? This interactive online course covers a composite of all things that office environment personnel should know. You will receive instruction in: safety culture, office safety, ergonomics, emergency procedures, blood borne pathogens, requirements for safety programs, incident reporting policy, employer responsibilities, required education and training, electrical safety, and hazard communication. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Identify office hazards and determine controls and communication
• Discuss ergonomic hazards related to office work environments
• Explain proper lifting and workstation positioning techniques
• Explain the bloodborne pathogen program and controls
• Describe a vehicle accident reporting processv
1 Intermediate English
Driving Safety As a professional, you are expected to be good at what you do. With regard to driving, this means striving to drive safely and accident-free. Each year, roughly 40,000 people lose their lives in motor vehicle accidents, which equates to about one fatal accident every 13 minutes. This interactive, online course is designed to help you avoid the devastating consequences that can result from a motor vehicle accident. By the end of this course you will be able to:
 
• Describe the factors typically involved in motor vehicle accidents
• Differentiate between the terms “not at fault” and “accident-free”
• Explain the terms “defensive driving” and “space management”
• Discuss specific defensive driving and space management techniques
• Explain the error-prone states of mind: frustration and anger, rushing, distraction, and drowsiness
• Discuss the role of alcohol in motor vehicle accidents
• Relate the importance of the condition of the vehicle and the safety features: safety belts, air bags, and antilock braking systems
 
0.5 Intermediate English
Respiratory Protection If there is not sufficient oxygen in the air that you inhale, your body cannot continue to function. If the air contains particulates that are small enough to enter your lungs, tissues in your lungs and other parts of your body could be damaged. If the inhaled air contains toxic gases, the gases can react with body fluids and damage your blood, lungs, and other vital organs. In this interactive, online course, you examine air-purifying respirators, air-supplied respirators, and the use and care of respirators. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
 
Describe the following and explain how they can be used:
air-purifying respirators
disposable filtering facepiece respirators
chemical cartridge or filter respirators
gas masks
air-line respirators
self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA)
portable escape respirators
Identify common types of air-purifying respirators
Explain how to choose the proper cartridge for a chemical cartridge respirator
Identify basic types of air-supplied respirators
List factors that affect respirator selection
Describe general rules for inspection, safe use, cleaning, and storage of respirators
0.5 Intermediate English
Safe Forklift Operation Forklifts must be operated properly or serious accidents and injuries can occur. An estimated 100 workers are killed each year in powered industrial truck accidents. This interactive, online course provides formal instruction in safe forklift operation. You will also need formal instruction in understanding forklifts and in making forklift safety checks. Before operating a forklift, you should also receive practical, hands-on training and be evaluated on how you operate your forklift in the workplace. By the end of the course, you will be able to: 
• Relate three basic tips for maneuvering a forklift with rear-wheel steering
• Describe how to drive a forklift, with emphasis on personal, tipover, traffic, and pedestrian safety
• Discuss at least one guideline associated with safely handling forklift  loads in these areas: visual inspection, load weight, lifting and carrying loads, and placing loads
0.5 Intermediate English
Ionizing Radiation Ionizing radiation is found in many sources and may be found in a wide range of occupational settings, including healthcare facilities, research institutions, nuclear reactors, nuclear weapon production facilities and other various manufacturing settings. The health effects of exposure to this radiation depend greatly on the level of exposure.
 
In this interactive, online course, we will cover the importance of time, distance and shielding on the level of exposure. Radiation sources can pose a considerable health risk to affected workers if not properly controlled. This course provides a starting point for technical and regulatory information regarding the recognition, evaluation, and control of occupation health hazards associated with ionizing radiation. 
By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Discuss the fundamental concepts of ionizing radiation such as the types, source and effects
• Describe the different units that are used in measuring ionizing radiation
• Recall exposure limits and discuss federal regulations regarding radiation exposure
• Describe safe practices and ways of controlling ionizing radiation
• Describe the different types of shielding materials
• Identify who should wear radiation dosimeters or badges
0.5 Intermediate English
Assessing Occupational Exposure Assessing occupational exposures is a process for managing the health risks associated with workplace exposures to chemical, physical, and biological agents. This interactive, online course will cover ways to assess and prioritize exposures into exposure control categories to focus resources on the highest risks, differentiate "acceptable" from "unacceptable" exposures, and discuss ways to control "unacceptable" exposures. This course will introduce comprehensive strategies to best manage risk and resources. By the end of this course you will be able to:
• Assess and prioritize exposures into exposure control categories and focus resources on highest risk
• Differentiate acceptable from unacceptable exposures
• Identify a comprehensive strategy for assessing exposures on specific workers and help prevent occupational illnesses
• Demonstrate an understanding of compliance with government and exposure guidelines
0.5 Intermediate English
Powered Industrial Trucks Improper use of powered industrial trucks can lead to catastrophic injury or death. Accidents can be avoided by adequate policy, procedures and training. This interactive online course will teach you the requirements for safely operating a forklift. You will also learn the OSHA standards that govern forklift safety. Additionally you will learn best practices for battery safety, storage and the handling. By the end of this course you will be able to:
• Describe the hazards related to PITs
• List the different types of PITs
• Describe safe operations for PITs
• Identify best practices for battery storage, handling, and safety
• List the requirements for operator training
 
1 Intermediate English
Eye and Face Protection Workers are subject to blindness, contusions and sometimes fatal injuries, due to eye and face hazards. 90% of all workplace eye injuries can be avoided by using the proper safety eyewear. This interactive online course will teach you how to select the proper personal protective equipment for eye safety. Additionally you will learn OSHA regulations for eye and face protection. You will also learn how to properly maintain your eye and face protective equipment. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Identify the OSHA eye and face violations
• Describe OSHA’s new regulation on eye and face protection
• Describe the personal protective equipment (PPE) hazard assessment requirement
• List resources for selecting the proper PPE
 
1 Intermediate English
Crystalline Silica: Understanding the Hazards Crystalline silica are very small particles of hazardous dust that can cause severe scarring of your lungs and possibly lead to death. This interactive online course will teach you how to recognize materials which may contain crystalline silica dust. Additionally you will learn how to stay compliant with OSHA regulations pertaining to crystalline silica. You will also learn about hazardous control techniques for silica exposure. By the end of this course you will be able to:
• Describe the health hazards of crystalline silica
• Recognize materials which may contain silica 
• Describe the compliance guidance for medical surveillance
• Identify the key provisions in the new silica standard
 
1 Intermediate English
DOT Hazardous Materials Safety In 2015, there were 42,000+ HazMat violations concerning the transport of Hazardous Materials. Violations included missing placards on vehicles, lack of hazard markings on packages, and errors on shipping papers. Federal Regulation 49 CFR 172.704 (a)(1) requires that all hazmat employees shall be provided general awareness/familiarization training in which hazardous materials are prepared or transported. In addition, the employee shall be able to recognize and identify hazardous materials consistent with the hazard communication standard. This interactive, online course will provide you with the tools to properly identify hazardous materials and prepare those materials for shipment. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
 
Identify the various hazardous material classifications
Recognize the consequences of not properly preparing packages for shipment
Apply steps to protect yourself and co-workers from hazards associated with preparing packages for shipment
Respond to shipments that have been rejected for shipment from transportation companies
Identify the various package material and which types are appropriate for shipping hazardous materials
2 Intermediate English
Explosive and Flammable Chemicals A review of the U.S. Chemical Safety Board's website shows a running scroll of chemical accidents in the news. Almost on a daily basis, there is a listing for a fire or explosion at an industrial site and many of these accidents are due to an explosive or flammable chemical. While production and use of these types of chemicals are essential to many industries, it is vital that they are handled properly to prevent the loss of life, property damage, or evacuations of nearby communities. Through this interactive, online course, a foundation for recognizing the classification of explosive or flammable chemicals will be provided. In addition, safe work practices for the storage and use of these chemicals will be presented. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
List appropriate regulations pertaining to explosive and flammable chemicals
Identify the classification of chemicals as explosive or flammable
Determine proper storage methods for explosive and flammable materials
Explain how to handle hazardous materials which are classified as explosive or flammable
1 Intermediate English
Electrical General Requirements Only a high level of quality is accepted for the installation process of electrical wiring. Any abnormal electrical condition has a potential to start a large fire, hurt someone, or kill them. This interactive online course will teach you how to inspect, deduce, select, and correctly install most common electrical raceway and conductor systems in a professional manner. You will also learn how to use different types of digital multimeters. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Define and Identify electrical terms found in the OSHA 1910.303 standard
• Describe how to use a digital multimeter
• Identify electrical components found in approved enclosures or building structures
• Describe proper installation procedures for electrical wiring
1 Intermediate English
Electrical Wiring Methods All use of electricity has some danger associated with it. Improper electrical wiring installation can lead to fires, injuries and even death. This interactive online course will teach you proper installation of basic electrical devices and equipment. Additionally you will learn about testing and inspection procedures for electrical wiring methods. You will also learn about different conduit systems and the expenses and time related to each wiring method. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Define and identify electrical construction industry terms found in the National Electric Code and OSHA 1910.305 standards
• Identify proper wiring methods to ensure public safety standards for electrical construction and use are achieved
• Identify proper installation, testing, and quality electrical industry wiring methods according to the National Electric Code and OSHA 1910.305 standards
• Describe electric branch circuits, electric equipment, and raceway systems for proper operation, safety, and reliability of electoral wiring methods
 
2 Intermediate English
HAZWOPER: Awareness OSHA has established several levels of training under the umbrella of HAZWOPER. Participants that have taken one or both of the training levels know exactly what is meant by this acronym. HAZWOPER stands for Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response. OSHA defines HAZWOPER through the General Industry Regulation Title 29, section 1910.120, also called 29 CFR 1910.20. This regulation defines several operations where HAZWOPER training is required, which will be reviewed in this Awareness Training.

This interactive online course will cover the Awareness Level of HAZWOPER training. Topics in this course include:
• Levels of training which must be completed
• Definition of hazardous materials informational resources
• Medical surveillance programs
• Engineering controls
• Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

 

By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Identify operations that require HAZWOPER training
• List HAZWOPER training levels
• Identify various hazardous materials
• Describe sources of information for the HAZWOPER First Responder
• Identify the required site-specific sections of an Emergency Response Plan
• Discuss the medical surveillance and exposure monitoring element of HAZWOPER
• Identify engineering controls and personal protective equipment (PPE) for HAZWOPER First Responders
1 Intermediate English
HAZWOPER: Operations OSHA has established several levels of training under the umbrella of HAZWOPER (Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response). HAZWOPER training is required for personnel that may potentially be exposed to hazardous materials and for those involved in spill cleanup operations. OSHA defines HAZWOPER through their General Industry Regulation Title 29, section 1910.120, also known as 29 CFR 1910.20. This regulation defines several operations where HAZWOPER training is required. The Operations portion of the HAZWOPER training will cover the following:
• Levels of training which must be completed
• Emergency plans and hazardous waste informational sources
• Responses to various hazardous waste sources
• Medical surveillance programs
• Site monitoring, engineering controls and work practices
• Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
By the end of the course, you will be able to:
• Identify hazardous materials involved in a spill or release
• Describe the implementation and execution of a facility emergency response plan
• Identify the proper PPE and spill cleanup material to be used during an incident response
• Discuss basic spill cleanup and decontamination procedures
• Describe the process for determining what material should be considered hazardous waste following a spill or release.
1 Intermediate English
Irritants, Corrosives and Sensitizers In this interactive online course, you will be introduced to the hazard classification and categories of an irritant, a corrosive, and sensitizer. In addition, you will learn how to identify these chemicals so you can protect yourself, and others, from them. Guidance for excessive risk will be given for these substances in the workplace. By the end of this course, you will be able to:

• Define what is an irritant, a corrosive, and a sensitizer
• Describe how hazards for these substances are communicated to employees and the public
• Identify hazards and risks of substance of these characteristics
• Describe the hazardous determination process

1 Intermediate English
Ammonia Safety In this interactive online course, you will be introduced to the tenants of ammonia safety in the workplace. You will discover how to identify ammonia and where ammonia exposures are likely to occur. You will learn how to properly handle and store ammonia. Emergency response procedures will be addressed regarding spills and leaks. By the end of this course, you will be able to:

• describe where ammonia exposures are likely to occur
• describe how workers can be exposed to ammonia 
• identify proper handling and storage requirements of ammonia in the workplace
• identify the signs and symptoms of ammonia exposure

1 Intermediate English
American Chemistry Council's Responsible Care Program In this interactive online course, you will be introduced to the program requirements for the American Chemistry Council Responsible Care Program. In addition, you will evaluate the global EHS initiatives that have been affected by member companies that participate in the Responsible Care Program. Finally, the inspection and reporting requirements will be explored regarding participation in the program. By the end of this course, you will be able to:

• Describe what ACC's Responsible Care Program is
• Describe why involvement with Responsible Care is important to society
• Identify EHS&S areas where Responsible Care member companies have been successful in the implementation of the program 
• Identify ways that a company would maintain compliance with Responsible Care

1 Intermediate English
Hand & Power Tool Safety Screwdrivers, wrenches, hammers, power actuated tools, nail guns, and saws. These are common industrial tools used to help workers easily perform maintenance and construction tasks. As common and simple as some of these tools may be, they each have the potential to cause serious injury if misused or improperly maintained. It’s important to understand the risks associated with the use of these tools, and safe procedures for working with these tools so that future injuries can be prevented.

This interactive online course is designed for front-line individuals who select and use various hand and power tools, including power actuated tools, nail guns, skill saws, saws, chain saws, table saws, screwdrivers, wrenches, and hammers. This course will identify the hazards associated with the use of these tools, and discuss safe operating practices to help prevent accidents. The course will also assess hand and power tool accidents, explain how these accidents occurred, and identify how they may be prevented.

By the end of this course you will be able to:
• Identify the most common types of hand and power tools
• Describe safe working practices for hand and power tools
• Identify the proper PPE to be worn while using hand and power tools
• Define hazards and controls for power actuated tools and nail guns
• Describe the importance of selecting and maintaining reliable, quality tools
1 Intermediate English
Transporting Hazardous Materials Every day, hazardous materials are shipped in this country—materials that could threaten the safety of individuals, property, and the environment. These materials are transported by truck, by train, by air, and by water. Because of the risks posed by transporting hazardous materials, you need to know about the potential dangers and steps you must take to help protect yourself and others against them.

In this interactive, online course, we'll cover some general requirements associated with transporting hazardous materials. We'll look at what's meant by the term hazardous materials, and we'll see how these materials are classified. We'll also look at documentation and packaging that must be used when hazardous materials are shipped, and we'll look at labels and placards used to identify hazardous materials.

By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Define the term hazardous materials and identify the Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations that control the shipment of these materials
• Identify and describe the different classes of hazardous materials
• Identify and describe terms and symbols used to identify hazardous materials
• Describe documentation that is needed to transport hazardous materials
• Describe types of packaging used to transport hazardous materials
• Describe markings used to identify hazardous materials contained in packaging
• Identify and describe labels and placards used to identify hazardous materials
0.5 Intermediate English
Ergonomics Economics What is ergonomics and how does it benefit you? This interactive online course looks at medical aspects which will help you understand why ergonomic study and a well-designed work environment are not only important, but essential. In addition to general solutions presented, you will review 13 common user-friendly ergonomic guidelines which have been developed from exhaustive studies. Finally, you will examine the economics of ergonomics to learn how well-designed ergonomic products and practices can help produce savings. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Define the following terms: ergonomics, microergonomic equipment, macroergonomic equipment, acute trauma, and cumulative trauma
• Briefly describe how each of the following traumas result from lack of ergonomic design and improper work techniques: lifting or pulling, twisting or turning, carpal tunnel syndrome, poor blood circulation, and bursitis
• List at least seven of the 13 presented common economic guidelines
• Explain how a net cost savings can result from increased efficiency due to implementation of an ergonomic change to a workstation object, such as a chair or a table
0.5 Intermediate English
Reasonable Suspicion of Drugs and Alcohol for Supervisors Do you have reason to suspect an employee of drug or alcohol use? If drug or alcohol use is suspected, it is every supervisor's and manager's responsibility to proactively assist the employee and protect others who may be affected by erratic or uncontrollable behavior due to drug use.

This interactive online course is designed to help managers, supervisors, and human resource professionals understand the legal and practical issues associated with testing employees for drug or alcohol use. It will inform designated employees on the "dos" and "don'ts", "whys" and "hows" in making a fair, reliable, and reasonable suspicion for a drug or alcohol referral to cover suspected employees performing safety-sensitive job functions.

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

• Describe how alcohol and drug use can affect the human body
• Identify the social and workplace issues involving alcohol and drug use
• Explain how alcohol and drug use can affect driving performance
• Define the term “Reasonable Suspicion” and determine when one can intervene in a reasonable suspicion case
• Explain how to respect employee’s privacy and handle difficult situations
• Identify who must conduct employee’s testing
• Describe how to document events and council employees

1 Intermediate English
Walking and Working Surfaces Slips, trips, and falls constitute the majority of general industry accidents, second only to motor vehicle accidents. They cause 15% of all accidental deaths, and are third only to motor vehicles and violence as a cause of fatalities. The OSHA standards for walking and working surfaces apply to all permanent places of employment, except where only domestic, mining, or agricultural work is performed and if appropriately applied, can reduce lost work time. This interactive online course details the OSHA standard in a practical format with easy to implement solutions to provide a workplace that is free from hazards to better protect the workplace and reduce unnecessary costs. At the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Define walking and working surfaces
• Describe requirements for aisles, stairways, guard rails and fall protection systems
• Identify areas within and outside of OSHA compliance
• Develop solutions to avoid injury
0.5 Intermediate English
General Industry Safety – Hazard Communication Chemicals can pose a danger to your health and the environment. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that there could be as many as 650,000 chemicals in use in the United States, and these chemicals are in over 5 million workplaces. This means that there are over 40 million American workers potentially exposed to hazardous chemicals while at their jobs.
 
This interactive online course explores the various methods that employers use to communicate information about hazardous chemicals in the workplace. You will learn requirements for labeling chemical containers and how to use Safety Data Sheets to identify chemical hazards in your workplace. Additionally, you will learn about employee safety training and hazard communication requirements.
 
Note: This course offers subtitles in Brazilian Portuguese and Spanish.
By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe the history and importance of the Hazard Communication Standard
• Compare acute and chronic health effects
• Identify the elements of a shipped container label
• Describe the types of information found on safety data sheets
• List the topics hazardous chemical training must include
• Describe the basic purpose and content of a written hazard communication program
0.5 Intermediate English
General Industry Safety – Personal Protective Equipment Various types of protective clothing protect workers from many job-related hazards, and protective equipment protects a worker’s head, hands, and feet. In certain situations, a worker may also need equipment that provides respiratory protection and fall protection.
 
This interactive online course teaches you about a variety of protective clothing you can wear to protect yourself against job-related hazards. You will learn about protective equipment you can use to protect your head, eyesight, and hearing. Additionally, you will learn about equipment used for respiratory protection and equipment used for fall protection.
By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe basic clothing that can be worn to protect against job-related hazards
• Describe a typical hard hat and other head protection used to protect the head from job-related hazards
• Describe types and uses of protective equipment commonly used to protect eyesight and hearing
• Describe equipment used for respiratory protection
• Describe typical equipment used for fall protection
0.5 Intermediate English
General Industry Safety – Confined Spaces Part of your job may involve entering and working in confined spaces. If you must work in a confined space, your life may depend on being properly informed about the hazards in the space and being properly prepared to protect yourself from those hazards. In this interactive, online course, we will discuss the general requirements of the OSHA Permit-required Confined spaces standard (29 CFR 1910.146). We will review the hazards associated with confined spaces and learn what you can do to protect yourself from them. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe the characteristics of a confined space and list examples
• Explain how a permit-required confined space differs from one that does not require a permit
• Describe the main types of hazards found in permit-required confined spaces
• Describe the general requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Permit-required Confined Spaces standard (29 CFR 1910.146)
• Describe the general requirements for a written permit space program
• Describe the general requirements of a typical entry permit
• Describe some general protective measures used to protect workers in confined spaces
• Describe general responsibilities of the confined space attendant
0.5 Intermediate English
General Industry Safety – Fall Protection Your job may often require you to work at elevated locations. Having appropriate fall protection in these situations is vital. Otherwise, you could find yourself plummeting toward serious injury. Employees must understand the regulations and be proactive in protecting themselves from any potential injuries. In this interactive, online course, we'll introduce you to the OSHA Fall Protection standard under 29 CFR, 1910. We will review situations where fall protection is needed, and discuss the basic means by which fall protection can be achieved. We'll also look at a specific kind of personal fall protection: a personal fall arrest system. Finally, we'll discuss how to properly select, use, and care for a personal fall arrest system.
 
Note: This course offers subtitles in Brazilian Portuguese and Spanish.
By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Describe the working conditions and tasks where fall protection is required and the purposes served by fall protection 
• Identify common methods to achieve fall protection in the workplace 
• Describe the difference between fall prevention and fall arrest 
• Identify and describe the basic parts of a typical personal fall arrest system 
• Describe the proper selection, use, and care of a personal fall arrest system
0.5 Intermediate English
General Industry Safety – Hearing Conservation How loud is too loud? When your job requires you to be exposed to high noise levels, it is essential for you to take steps to protect your hearing. Infrequent exposure to loud noises may not be hazardous, but prolonged exposures to these noises can cause irreversible hearing loss. In this interactive online course, you will examine hazardous noise levels, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, OSHA’s, occupational noise exposure standard, and how protection equipment, such as earplugs and earmuffs, can help protect your hearing. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Define the terms sound, sound wave, and noise 
• Describe the sound wave properties of intensity and frequency 
• Identify your employer’s responsibilities concerning high-noise area identification, hearing protection and training, and hearing tests, per OSHA 
• Describe how earplugs and earmuffs provide hearing protection
0.5 Intermediate English
New Employee Safety Orientation All occupations, even ones that are not typically assigned to dangerous tasks, have certain safety hazards associated with them. For some occupations, the hazards are obvious. For other occupations, however, the hazards may be less apparent. It would be difficult to fully discuss all safety rules and regulations to avoid every danger you could potentially encounter in your job. So, instead, this online interactive course provides a basic overview of safety issues to help improve your safety awareness. These safety issues include safe work habits, which should be part of your daily routine; personal protective equipment, which may be required to maintain your health and safety on the job; hazard communication, which provides vital information about chemicals and other hazards that affect working conditions; and fire safety, which is a critical concern in any workplace. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• identify good housekeeping practices that promote workplace safety 
• describe safety concerns associated with the proper use of tools and ladders 
• state methods for isolating energy sources 
• describe the steps for responding to electrical shock 
• list types of personal protective equipment commonly used and for special hazards 
• describe the types of information found on Safety Data Sheets 
• compare the colors and numbers used on a fire diamond 
• describe warning labels and signs that may be used to communicate information about hazards in a workplace 
• describe basic steps for responding to a fire 
• compare the uses of different classes of fire extinguishers
0.5 Intermediate English
CPR Academic Each year approximately 250,000 people die of sudden cardiac arrest in the United States. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a combination of rescue breathing and chest compressions delivered to victims thought to be in cardiac arrest. During cardiac arrest, the heart stops pumping blood, blood pressure falls to zero, and the pulse stops. Within 10 seconds a victim may lose consciousness and become unresponsive. CPR helps circulate blood that contains oxygen to the brain and other vital organs and can help "buy time" until help arrives. This course highlights how to recognize the signs of cardiac arrest, how and when to perform CPR, and how to use an AED to help a person in cardiac arrest. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• Select the signs and symptoms of choking and provide care
• Describe the signs and symptoms of a heart attack and provide care to reduce the possibility of cardiac arrest
• List how to administer CPR when a person's heart stops beating
• Identify the links in the cardiac chain of survival
• List the steps for use of an automatic external defibrillator (AED)
1 Intermediate English
General First Aid, Part I First aid is the basic medical knowledge that could save a life. The risks involved with daily life may call for immediate action and you may be the only one capable of doing it. First aid will never replace professional medical care, but many injuries will only require first aid care. This course covers basic first aid techniques, including care for childbirth, chest pain, and stroke. This course is Part 1 of a two-part series. This training program has 14 learning modules with a ten-question exam. By the end of this course you will be able to:
• Identify the legal considerations associated with providing first aid
• List how to protect yourself from disease transmission when providing emergency care
• Select the signs of an emergency
• Describe basic first aid for illnesses in the event of emergencies, such as asthma and chest pain
1 Intermediate English
General First Aid, Part II First aid is the basic medical knowledge that could help save a life. It is the emergency care or treatment given to an injured or ill person. The many accidents and illnesses that occur in daily life may call for immediate action, and you may be the only one capable of doing it. While first aid will never replace professional medical care, it sometimes can be enough for many minor injuries. For more serious injuries and illnesses, first aid is an important, often vital, first step in providing care. This course covers basic first aid techniques, including care for insect bites, injuries, burns, and poisonings.  By the end of this course you will be able to: 

      • Identify the steps to take before providing emergency care
      • Describe basic first aid for injuries in the event of an emergency

1 Intermediate English
Machine Guarding Crushed hands and arms, severed fingers and blindness are just some of the possible machinery-related injuries. There are many hazards created by moving machine parts. Machine guarding and training are essential for protecting workers from needless and preventable injuries. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• discuss how safeguards should be utilized
• explain how machinery is modified to protect the worker
• work with machines in a safe manner
• identify what makes a machine dangerous 
1 Intermediate English
Fleet Program Adjusting to Changing Conditions In 2005, 848,000 crashes in the U.S. occurred under rain, sleet, or snow conditions, and although there are far fewer vehicles on roadways at nighttime, over half of all vehicle crashes involving fatalities occurred in dim or dark lighting.* Certainly environmental conditions play a significant role in vehicle crashes. The most unfortunate aspect of such collisions is that oftentimes they are entirely preventable. The main culprit in such crashes is not the effect of the environment but the drivers who failed to recognize the hazardous conditions and drive appropriately.
 
Environmental conditions that can affect driving include weather, visibility, and road surface quality. All of these require drivers to be able to respond appropriately and suit their driving performance to make sure the vehicle handles safely under the conditions present. This course reviews these environmental conditions and explains the required driver responses to ensure safe vehicle operations.
By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• recognize hazardous conditions on the roadway
• explain how to adjust your driving to meet hazardous conditions
• describe how to handle various driving emergencies 
1 Intermediate English
Operating an AED More than 600,000 patients die each year from cardiovascular diseases. Half of these deaths occur before the patient reaches the hospital. Many times, collapse and sudden death is the first sign of cardiac disease. Research has shown that rapid defibrillation is the major determinant of survival in cardiac arrest caused by ventricular fibrillation. This course highlights the signs and symptoms of cardiac compromise, the steps to take to use an automated external defibrillator (AED) properly, special considerations and precautions involving the use of an AED. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
• describe the proper use of both monophasic and biphasic AEDs 
• discuss safety considerations for the use of AEDs
• identify the indications and contraindications for the use of monophasic and biphasic AEDs
• evaluate the importance of documentation of a cardiac incident involving use of an AED, as well as the need for proper care ad maintenance of AEDs 
1 Intermediate English
First Responder Operations Level Refresher This course is designed to be a refresher for the Operations Level Responder to Hazardous Materials Incidents, meeting the requirements of NFPA 472 and 29 CFR 1910.120(q). The course is divided into four modules. Each module should take approximately two hours to complete.
 
The first module covers how to survey a hazmat spill or incident; how to collect hazard and response information with MSDSs, labels, and markings; and how to identify the various transport containers and storage tanks used for hazardous materials.
 
The second module covers the chemical and physical properties of materials and their impact on storage and transport containers; response objectives, including how to assess the risk to a responder for each hazard class; and how to determine the suitability of SCBA and personal protective equipment.
 
The third module covers the principles of site management, how to establish and enforce control zones, and tactics for emergency decontamination. It will discuss common types of releases and how to deal with them, and how to conduct defensive operations such as damming and diking and air monitoring.
 
The fourth module covers incident management systems and the first responder's role in a response plan. It will also cover the potential for terrorist attacks, typical agents used in a terrorist event, and the appropriate response tactics.
8 Intermediate English
Sexual Harassment Prevention: Quick Refresh This course is designed as a review to supplement a comprehensive sexual harassment prevention course. Sexual harassment is one of the most litigated areas of the law. Virtually all major companies, government organizations, colleges and universities, and even the military, now have sexual harassment policies in place. Creating a supportive environment is one of the best ways to prevent sexual harassment in the workplace. Learn about sexual harassment prevention programs and other preventive actions you can take to eliminate harassing behavior in the workplace. For the sake of brevity, some information has been omitted, summarized, or simplified. 0.5 Intermediate English
Sexual Harassment Prevention for Employees (AB1825 & AB2053) Sexual harassment is a form of employment discrimination prohibited under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Title VII prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, and national origin. In this course the student will be learning how to recognize sexual harassment, what to do when it happens, how companies should respond with policies and procedures to protect their employees from this type of behavior. 1 Intermediate English
Sexual Harassment Prevention for Managers (AB1825 & AB2053) Sexual harassment is a constant presence in America’s workplaces. To prevent harassment, we need to understand it. For many people, “sexual harassment” is an emotionally-charged topic loaded with confusion and uncertainty. This course is designed to provide a comprehensive explanation of what sexual harassment is, how it can occur in the workplace, current legal positions, and how management can maintain a harassment-free workplace. Some of the topics that will be covered in this course include: behaviors that constitute sexual harassment, the different types of harassment including abusive conduct, what constitutes a hostile work environment, and how to handle complaints. If you are a manager in California this course includes specific references to California laws regarding Sexual Harassment training. This course is designed to meet CA compliant standards. 2.5 Intermediate English
Occupational Safety Training: Walking and Working Surfaces Did you know that slips, trips, and falls are leading causes of general industry accidents? These types of accidents constitute about 15 percent of all accidental deaths in the United States. In the course, Walking and Working Surfaces, you will be introduced the general safety requirements for housekeeping, aisles and passageways, covers and guardrails, and floor loading protection. We will introduce you to the various ways and techniques that you can use to protect floor openings, holes, and wall openings. We will also take a look at potential safety threats for stairways and portable ladders and the safety measures you can take to secure these areas. 1 Intermediate English
Occupational Safety Training: Safety and Health Programs Safety and Health Programs focuses on why organizations should implement safety and health programs, and what must be in place in order for these types of programs to be effective. By taking this course, you will recognize the benefits of an effective safety and health program and be able to list the four key elements. Whether you are a business owner looking for ways to improve costs and workplace safety, or a worker interested in learning more about how a safety and health program can benefit you, this course will provide you with the information you need. 0.75 Intermediate English
Occupational Safety Training: Personal Protective Equipment OSHA Standards for Personal Protective Equipment takes a deeper look at using PPE controls in the workplace. This course describes the two primary means of protecting employees from workplace hazards before considering PPE; explains what should be included in PPE training; lists PPE that may be used for protection; and identifies hazards that are reduced or eliminated by using the appropriate PPE for eye, face, head, hearing, foot, hand and body protection. 0.75 Intermediate English
Occupational Safety Training: Machine Guarding This course goes over OSHA’s standards for machine guarding, to protect employees from being injured while working with machinery with unguarded moving parts. Proper training in Machine Guarding is essential for all employees who work with any type of machinery or may come in contact with machinery. This training identifies the different types of guards, and when and how to use them. With the knowledge gained in this course, employees will be able to maintain safety when using machines. 1 Intermediate English
Occupational Safety Training: Fire Safety and Prevention Fire safety training is an important part of safety in the workplace. Employers must train employees about fire hazards that exist in the workplace, how to prevent fires, and what to do in the event one occurs. By taking this course, you will be able to identify fire hazards; know the proper way to evacuate safely in the event of a fire; and be able to identify fire extinguishers and how to use them properly. 0.75 Intermediate English
Occupational Safety Training: Fall Protection Fall Protection provides you with a look at the work conditions that require the use of fall protection and the available options to protect employees from falls. By taking this course, you will be able to identify fall protection methods available for protecting employees; the basic conditions that trigger the use of fall protection for employees in the general industry; and the importance of good work practices and training. Implementing each of these elements in your workplace will ensure that employees are protected from fall hazards whether four feet or forty feet from the ground. 0.75 Intermediate English
Occupational Safety Training: Hazardous Materials The storage and disposal of hazardous materials can be a serious threat to the environment. The improper storage and disposal of hazardous material is also a critical safety and health problem that continues to endanger both human and animal life. Hazardous Materials focuses on OSHA’s requirements for hazardous materials and hazardous waste operations; the requirements for emergency response at uncontrolled hazardous worksites and treatment, storage and disposal facilities; and the steps an employer must take to protect the health and safety of employees in these environments. 0.75 Intermediate English
Occupational Safety Training: Introduction to Industrial Hygiene Industrial hygiene covers a vast number of subjects in the working environment. Early in its history, OSHA understood that industrial hygiene played an integral part of ensuring a healthful work setting. It is paramount to use the application of industrial hygiene concepts in its health standards and as a tool to effectively enforce job safety and health regulations. By recognizing and applying the basic values of industrial hygiene to the work environment, the workplace will become healthier and safer. Learn how to identify sources of potential problems, about the different types of hazards, and how to control and respond to those hazards in the workplace. 0.75 Intermediate English
Occupational Safety Training: Electrical Safety Every day, an average of one worker is electrocuted on the job. Not only can electricity cause death, but it can also cause serious injury from shock, burns, and falls. In our course, Electrical Safety, the student will be learning how electricity works, what kind of electrical injuries there are and how they occur, and they will review a variety of electrical hazards including, overview of electrical hazards, wiring and overload hazards, and grounding hazards. This course will finish up by going over the electrical safety training requirements. 1 Intermediate English
Occupational Safety Training: Bloodborne Pathogens The proper training in Bloodborne Pathogens is important for the safety of employees in all work categories. It is particularly essential for employees who are constantly at risk of exposure to blood, fluids, or other contaminated materials that are known to cause illnesses, or even death. This video training identifies the types of BBPs, BBP exposure, and the proper protection from exposure, how to dispose of contaminated or used materials, and what to do in the event of exposure. It is important to know the ways in which infections can lead to exposure and transmission, and ways to prevent exposure through personal protective equipment and vaccinations. Take a closer look at bloodborne pathogens. 0.5 Intermediate English
Occupational Safety Training: Flammable and Combustible Liquids There are two primary hazards associated with flammable and combustible liquids: explosion and fire. In order to prevent these hazards, the National Fire Protection Association’s publication NFPA 30, Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code was created. In our course, Flammable and Combustible Liquids, the student will cover topics on the definitions of 29 CFR1910.106, classes of combustible liquids, flammable (explosive) limits, as well as container and portable tank storage. 0.5 Intermediate English
Occupational Safety Training: Hazard Communication OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) is based on a simple concept – that employees have both a need and a right to know the hazards and identities of the chemicals they are exposed to when working. HCS addresses the issues of evaluating and communicating chemical hazard information to workers. In our course, Hazard Communications, we will be giving the student an in-depth look into hazard communications and how it affects the workplace. 0.5 Intermediate English
Occupational Safety Training: Introduction to OSHA Many of the health and safety programs and procedures in this Health and Safety Guide are derived from federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations. This course provides you with some background information about OSHA and OSHA standards, inspections, citations, and penalties. At the end of this course, you will be able to distinguish between the role of OSHA and the role of the office of Environmental Health and Safety (EHS). Learn more about the role of OSHA in establishing a safe and secure work environment. 0.5 Intermediate English
Occupational Safety Training: Ergonomics in the Workplace Employers have the responsibility of providing safe workplaces for employees. Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or OSHA, has created ergonomics program guidelines for various industries, from meatpacking plants to nursing homes to retail grocery stores. Ergonomics is defined as fitting a job to a person. It is concerned with posture and movement of the body and environmental factors present when a task is being performed. This course covers ergonomics in the workplace. 1 Intermediate English
Occupational Safety Training: Emergency Action Plans Emergencies are unpredictable; therefore it is most effective to prepare in advance to handle a crisis situation by creating an Emergency Action Plan. OSHA requires written Emergency Action Plans for many businesses, and certain businesses have specific additional regulations. This course gives you a look at how to prepare an Emergency Action Plan and includes how to integrate OSHA regulations into the plan. 1 Intermediate English
Occupational Safety Training: Lockout/Tagout In our course, Lockout/Tagout, our intent is to establish the minimum requirements for the lockout or tagout of energy isolating devices. This is done to prevent unexpected energization, start-up, or release of stored energy that may cause injury. This course will cover the requirements and definitions of lockout/tagout, who is responsible for the implementation of lockout/tagout procedures, as well as employee training/retraining, device requirements, and procedural requirements. This course will also cover lockout/tagout procedures. 0.5 Intermediate English
Occupational Safety Training: Respiratory Protection A respirator is a device that is intended to protect employees from inhaling dangerous substances, such as chemicals and infection particulates. Respirators are among the most important parts of protective equipment for working in hazardous environments. This course will provide basic information on respirators and respiratory protection to workers and employers. The topics that will be covered include what respirators are, how respirators function, and what is needed for a respirator to provide protection. 0.5 Intermediate English
Occupational Safety Training: Slips, Trips, and Falls Slips, trips, and falls make up the majority of the general industry accidents. These types of injuries are responsible for 20 percent of all occupational injuries. the potential for a slip, trip, or fall to occur is always present at a work site or office. Our course, Slips, Trips, and Falls, is designed to teach employees and employers about one of the most common and preventable causes of serious injury and deaths. This course will cover the best practices to help avoid these types of accidents. The student will learn how to be more aware of how slip, trip, and fall injuries continue to happen and how they can be reduced. 1 Intermediate English
OSHA 10 Hour Construction Program The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recommends Outreach Training Program courses as an orientation to occupational safety and health for workers. And while workers may need additional training based on OSHA standards and the specific hazards of their jobs, RedVector’s OSHA-online 10-Hour Construction Industry Outreach Training program can help inject entry-level workers with critical knowledge on a variety of OSHA-regulated safety and health topics.

Here you can learn the basics about what topics fall under OSHA’s umbrella, how OSHA operates to protect both workers and employers, and how you personally can benefit from knowing OSHA’s standards.
 
Note: OSHA regulations state that a student can not spend longer than 7.5 hours in a OSHA 10 course per training day.  Please allocate a minimum of two (2) calendar days to complete this training.

The specific Modules covered in this course are:

• Introduction to OSHA
• Electrical Safety
• Fall Protection
• Struck-By & Caught-Between Accidents 
• Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
• Scaffolds
• Cranes
• Hand & Power Tools
• Excavations
• Materials Storage
• Demolition
• Hazards in Construction

Upon successful completion of this 10 Hour Program, you will be able to:

• Explain OSHA’s purpose and how its standards serve to make the workplace safer for construction workers
• Discuss the major areas in construction to which OSHA standards apply, and what those standards mandate 
• Recall what employer/employee issues OSHA covers, how and when to contact OSHA , and what protections OSHA may provide 
• Name overall safety practices relevant to the construction industry, and explain what precautions to take against hazards on the job 
• Obtain your OSHA 10 Card

10 Fundamental English
IICRC 7 Hour Mold Remediation Program #1 This program is designed to give a background on Mold Detection and Remediation. The program also discusses the personal protective equipment to wear and the chemicals used in mold remediation projects. This program has 4lessons with a test at the end of each lesson which must be passed with a score of 70% or better to move on to the next lesson. The 4 lessons are:

Lesson 1: Toxic Mold Detection, Prevention, & Remediation

Lesson 2: Mold Remediation

Lesson 3: Personal Protective Equipment for Mold Remediation Contractors and Consultants

Lesson 4: Chemicals Used in Mold Remediation

By the end of the program, you will be able to:

• Identify an indoor mold problem and determine its severity.
• Identify Building and HVAC design, construction and operation and maintenance practices that can help control or prevent mold.
• Identify the first step in remediating mold in a confined space
• Differentiate between limited and full containment
• Identify the basics of the OSHA regulations related to PPE
• Distinguish the necessary hand protection that also provides the dexterity you need
• Discuss advantages and disadvantages to each sterilizer, disinfectant, sanitizer, and cleaner -Recognize the controversies you will encounter regarding the selection and use of chemicals

7 Intermediate English
Texas Electrician 4 Hour CE Program #3 This four-hour course is presented in four lessons.

Lesson 1 – NFPA 70E® 2018 Updates   This interactive online course will cover the most recent updates and changes from NFPA 70E® 2018 as well as offer some education on what we need to be doing to stay compliant from an electrical safety perspective as it relates to these new updates. Upon completion, you will walk away with a much better understanding of what can be done to reach electrical compliance.

 

Lesson 2 – Texas State Laws and Rules for Electricians.  This 1-hour interactive online course discusses Title 8, Occupations Code, Chapter 1305 of the Texas Statutes, and 16 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 73 of the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation. These two codes contain important information regarding the regulation, licensing, and conduct standards for Texas Electricians. By reviewing this information on a regular basis, you will stay abreast of changes and amendments to the Texas State Laws and Rules as they pertain to this profession. 

 

Lesson 3 – 2017 NEC Changes: Overcurrent Protection and Grounding & Bonding.   Article 240 and 250 of the National Electrical Code (NEC) contain the requirements for overcurrent protection and for grounding and bonding. Several changes were made in Articles 240 and 250. In this interactive, online course, we will discuss notable changes to the 2017 NEC. Such changes include the addition of arc energy reduction requirements for fuses, additional options for the grounding of separately derived systems, changes to the allowed and prohibited types of grounding electrodes, recognizing new options for intersystem bonding, clarifying the rules for parallel conductors, and others.

 

Lesson 4 – 2017 NEC Changes: Special Equipment.  In this interactive online course we cover Chapter 6 of the 2017 National Electrical Code (NEC) and the changes it contains for special equipment requirements. Several changes were made in the articles for special equipment, including signs, electric vehicle charging systems and swimming pools. Notable changes include new requirements for signs with retrofitted illumination systems and changes to wiring methods for swimming pools and similar installations.

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

 

·         Recall the 2018 changes to NFPA 70E®

·         Recall the six-point plan for electrical safety

·         Define “electrical contractor” based on Texas Occupations Code, §1305.002(5)

·         Define “on-the-job” training based on the Texas Occupations Code, §1305.002(11)

·         Recall the insurance requirements of an electrical contractor in the state of Texas

·         List the standards of conduct for engaging in electrical work in the state of Texas

·         Describe the new requirements for arc energy reduction 

·         Locate requirements for photovoltaic powered signs, and the 2017 NEC

·         Describe the requirements for signs where retrofitted illumination systems

·         Describe the updated requirements for electric vehicles

·         Explain the changes to underground wiring methods for pools

4 Intermediate English
Texas Electrician 4 Hour CE Program #4 This four-hour course is presented in three lessons.

Lesson 1 – NFPA 70E® 2018 Updates   This interactive online course will cover the most recent updates and changes from NFPA 70E® 2018 as well as offer some education on what we need to be doing to stay compliant from an electrical safety perspective as it relates to these new updates. Upon completion, you will walk away with a much better understanding of what can be done to reach electrical compliance.

 
Lesson 2 – Texas State Laws and Rules for Electricians.  This 1-hour interactive online course discusses Title 8, Occupations Code, Chapter 1305 of the Texas Statutes, and 16 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 73 of the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation. These two codes contain important information regarding the regulation, licensing, and conduct standards for Texas Electricians. By reviewing this information on a regular basis, you will stay abreast of changes and amendments to the Texas State Laws and Rules as they pertain to this profession.
 

Lesson 3 – 2017 NEC Changes: Branch Circuit, Feeder and Services.  Chapter 2 of the 2017 National Electrical Code (NEC) contains requirements for wiring of grounded conductors, branch, feeder and service conductors. Several changes were made for branch circuit conductors, feeder conductors and service conductors in Articles 210, 215, and 230, and, as always, they are some of the biggest in the entire Code. This interactive, online course covers changes that include new and revised rules for GFCI and AFCI protection, dwelling unit circuiting and receptacles outlet revisions, fixing the electric service receptacle rule, adding required lighting, adding receptacles in commercial buildings(!), clarifying how to size feeders, and new listing rules for service equipment, and others as well.

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

 

·         Recall the 2018 changes to NFPA 70E®

·         Recall the six-point plan for electrical safety

·         Define “electrical contractor” based on Texas Occupations Code, §1305.002(5)

·         Define “on-the-job” training based on the Texas Occupations Code, §1305.002(11)

·         Recall the insurance requirements of an electrical contractor in the state of Texas

·         List the standards of conduct for engaging in electrical work in the state of Texas

·         Explain the new rules for GFCI's and AFCI's 

·         Describe the changes to required branch circuits and receptacles in dwelling units and commercial buildings

4 Intermediate English
Análisis de riesgos por destello de arco (Arc Flash Hazard Analysis – The Basics) La electricidad viaja a la velocidad de la luz, sorprendentemente a unos 299 338 kilómetros (186 000 millas) por segundo. Sin duda, esto es mucho más rápido de lo que ningún ser humano puede reaccionar ante una situación de peligro eléctrico. La acumulación exponencial de calor  de una falla de arco puede causar una explosión en una fracción de  segundo, dejando destrucción y muerte a su paso. Los trabajadores expuestos con frecuencia a equipos eléctricos conectados deben comprender qué es un destello de arco, cómo se produce y cómo se puede prevenir. Realizar un análisis de riesgos por destello de arco puede ayudar a predecir la posibilidad de una falla de arco y asegurar que los trabajadores estén usando equipo de protección  personal adecuado para estar protegidos en caso de que ocurra un destello de arco.  Comprender el peligro y cómo evitarlo es una cuestión de vida o muerte.    

 
En la primera parte de este curso interactivo en linea de 1 hora se hablará acerca de la definición, las causas y los peligros de un destello de arco, la historia del análisis de riesgos por detello de arco y los órganos de rectores para la prevención del destello de arco. En la siguiente parte de la sección se tratan los componentes del análisis de riesgos por destello de arco y cómo el análisis se utiliza para aplicar las normas de seguridad de OSHA mediante la determinación de distancias de trabajo, la elección del equipo de protección personal y la capacitación de los trabajadores. Por último, este curso abarcará la prevención de riesgos de arco (cómo los avances tecnológicos están permitiendo a los trabajadores  realizar mantenimiento remoto a los equipos y cómo los nuevos dispositivos pueden prevenir los arcos antes de que comiencen).

Al finalizar este curso usted podrá: 

• Hablar sobre las causas y los peligros de un destello de arco
• Relatar la historia del análisis de riesgos por destello de arco
• Reconocer los órganos de gobierno para la prevención de destello de arco y la normalización en seguridad
• Enumerar las variables que se usan para el cálculo del análisis de riesgo de destello de arco
• Describir cómo se pone en práctica la seguridad contra los peligros por destello de arco en base a cálculos
• Comprender los componentes de la capacitación en seguridad contra riesgos por destello de arco
• Definir las técnicas y la tecnología de prevención de riesgos por destello de arco

 

1 Fundamental Spanish
Killer Bees Wasps And Spiders This program provides understanding and prevention techniques when you are faced with a potential bite. It trains employees to protect themselves from these insects, and covers when and why a bee is likely to attack, how to defend oneself, treatment for bee stings and spider bites, and recognizing allergic reactions. 0.5 Fundamental English
Chains Cranes Slings & Hoists Illustrates proper use of cranes and lifting devices while emphasizing safety. This program explains sling angles, safety techniques, and inspection procedures, and is designed for anyone operating jib hoists or cranes. Anyone operating this equipment must be trained; this program meets OSHA training requirements outlined in 1910.180. Topics covered also include: Practices for inspection, maintenance and safe use of lifting devices. Daily pre-use inspection and proper use of equipment. Physics of sling angles and safe load capacities. Don't twist chains, swing and raise loads over body. 0.25 Fundamental English
Shipping Of Hazardous Material This great video explains how the shipping process works, what regulations guide you through the shipping process, and some other useful information on shipping hazardous materials. The goal is to make you aware of hazardous materials and the proper shipping procedures. This program complies with 49 CFR Section 172.704.Topics covered also include:Hazard classes, division, packing groupsMaterials classification and documentationLoading and load segregationHazardous materials table 0.25 Fundamental English
Kitchen Safety With the kitchen being one of the busiest departments in your establishment, employees may be tempted to take shortcuts when it comes to safety. New and experienced kitchen staff will benefit from watching this program as they learn the potential hazards present in the kitchen environment and what action to take to reduce the risk of accidents or injuries.Topics covered also include:Prevention of slips, trips and fallsKnife use and safetyKitchen machineryFire and burn preventionChemical and hazardous materials 0.25 Fundamental English
Slips Trips and Falls (Hospitality) Slips and falls can happen to anyone, and may happen anywhere on your property. In this video, you'll view several different scenarios of slips, trips and falls in the hospitality industry. It examines steps that you and your employees can take to prevent future injuries.Topics covered also include:Circumstances of conditions that can contribute to an incident.Employee behavior that contributed to each incident.What steps can be taken to prevent future, similar occurrences. 0.1 Fundamental English
Lockout Tagout (Hospitality Industry) Lockout/Tagout procedures and training are mandated by OSHA and may be necessary for many pieces of equipment in your facility during maintenance or repair. This video will ensure that all of your employees are aware of when this critical compliance issue applies to them. Great for raising awareness and teaching employees about safety regarding Lockout/Tagout.Topics covered also include:KitchensLaundry roomsMaintenanceSpas 0.25 Fundamental English
Fire Prevention in Healthcare Fire can be a frightening safety concern for employees, yet many do not realize how their own actions or inactions can contribute to the risk of fire. This video covers many topics including common causes of fires in healthcare facilities, how to prevent fires, the concept of flashpoint, fire extinguishers and first aid, among others. Updated for 2014 with the new GHS Standard. Topics covered also include: Common causes of fires in healthcare facilities Preventing fires The concept of 'flashpoint' and 'classes' of fires Fire extinguishers and how to handle flammable materials First aid, evacuation and other employee responsibilities 0.25 Fundamental English
Norovirus: Facts & Prevention Did you know as many as half of all food related outbreaks of illness may be caused by the norovirus? This must-see video shows you how noroviruses are transmitted and contracted, how to prevent transmission and how to contain outbreaks of the infection. Topics covered also include: The definition of Norovirus How infection occurs, symptoms, and treatment What to do during an outbreak 0.25 Fundamental English
Security Awareness – Management Training (Hospitality) According to the Department of Homeland Security, hotels are soft targets. Ensure that your property managers respond effectively and appropriately to emergencies with as little disruption to guests as possible. This video is a great way to train management on what threat levels are and what action must be taken to minimize risk regardless of the threat level.Topics covered also include:Emergency Action PlanPrevention, reporting and investigation proceduresBehavior, not appearance, is key to maintaining safetySecuring non-public rooms, gates, etc.Levels of security and law enforcement notification guidelinesResponsibilities of management for guest safetyCommon risks and how to deal with them 0.25 Fundamental English
Dealing with Drug and Alcohol Abuse for Employees More than 75 million Americans deal with a substance abuse issue. That's about one in 10 workers. Abusers in the workplace cause safety issues for everyone and can tarnish your company's reputation. This program discusses various types of substance abuse in the workplace, how they can affect somebody's work situation, and what employees can do to help keep their workplaces drug and alcohol free. 0.25 Fundamental English
Bus Persons Dishwashers and Janitor Safety (Hospitality) Hospitality workers encounter a significant amount of daily risk in their jobs. With this thorough video that illustrates preventative safety measures, workers will be able to maintain a safer work environment for everyone, including customers. Covers uniforms, back injuries, cleanliness, burns, and more.Topics covered also include:Back injury; safe liftingCuts and burnsSLIPs and falls 0.25 Fundamental English
Dishwashers: Safe Work Practices Dishwashers work in a unique setting that requires extra attention to safety. Food handling, water temperature and equipment safety are featured in this video. The program addresses specific dish washing hazards and increases awareness of personal safety while working in the dish washing area.Topics covered also include:Adopting personal responsibility for safetyPreventing cuts and burnsIdentifying safety hazards 0.1 Fundamental English
Universal Housekeeping Safety Training for Hospitality Safe housekeeping is key to performance in the hospitality industry. This fantastic and easy-to-understand video highlights common hazards, and teaches housekeepers how to recognize them and take the steps necessary to minimize or eliminate risk. Works in any language as it contains no words, only demonstrations. 0.25 Fundamental English
Conflict Resolution – Industrial Whenever two or more people come together, eventually they will experience conflict. Give your employees the skills to work toward a solution in a productive, positive way with this comprehensive program. Techniques and strategies to limit the damage and disruption are discussed in this straightforward video. 0.25 Fundamental English
Conflict Resolution – Office Whenever two or more people come together, eventually they will experience conflict. Give your employees the skills to work toward a solution in a productive, positive way with this comprehensive program. Techniques and strategies to limit the damage and disruption are discussed in this straightforward video. 1 Fundamental English
Safe Operation of Scissor & Boom Lifts Scissor and boom lifts come in various lift styles, designed for different applications and site conditions. But without proper training, there is the potential for serious injury or death when operated in an unsafe manner. This program discusses procedures operators must follow to prevent njuries such as electrocution, falls, crushed body parts and tip overs.Topics covered also include:Operator training and authorizationLeverage, weight capacity and other factors that affect stabilityPre-operational inspectionTesting of functions and controlsSafe driving proceduresUse of harnesses and lanyards, and avoiding falls from platforms 0.25 Fundamental English
Boom Truck – Bucket Truck Safety Bucket truck work puts operators at risk every day. For their protection and your company's thorough training is essential. This unique video has everything you need to deliver professional training on the subject; the kind of training your operators will benefit from for years to come. Developed with OSHA guidelines in mind, this program covers critical material your operators need to stay safe.Topics covered also include:Daily Safety InspectionsWorksite InspectionFall HazardsFall ProtectionTip Over PreventionElectrical Hazards 0.25 Fundamental English
Pandemic Flu: The Facts The threat of a global influenza epidemic is very real. Now is the time to insure your company is prepared. This program is a great way to raise awareness in your workplace and train your employees on the proper universal precautions they need to take to protect themselves and contain the spread of disease. Ensure that employees will act and react in a calm, confident manner in the event of an outbreak or potential outbreak situations.Topics covered also include:Information on historical pandemicsGeneral methods of transmissionProper universal precautionsSelf-quarantine: don't come to work and infect others 0.15 Fundamental English
The Safe Operation of Utility Carts Utility Carts are used in many types of facilities from warehouses to apartment complexes. This video addresses the many hazardous and potentially dangerous situations often overlooked by Utility Cart operators. It stresses the importance of following safety guidelines, and the problems caused by complacency in the operation and basic maintenance of these utility vehicles.Topics covered also include:Daily Inspections (tires, fluids, steering, obstacles)Load limitsOccupant & Pedestrian safetySpeeding, skidding & slick surfacesTurns, center of gravity & blind spotsBacking up, ramps and parkingRules for riders 0.15 Fundamental English
Preventing The Spread Of Contagious Illness This new program, which includes information about seasonal flu, avian flu, SARS and MRSA in addition to swine flu, explains the origins and symptoms of these illnesses as well as the general hygiene and prevention measures required to prevent spreading and contracting all contagious illnesses. The video stresses prevention and the personal responsibility required to avoid spreading an illness or infection.Topics covered also include:Decontaminating work areasSpecial MRSA precautionsResponding to a potential infectionMedical diagnosis and treatment of contagious illnesses 0.25 Fundamental English
Good Housekeeping: Keeping Your Workplace Safe This video will offer viewers training on staying compliant with OSHA'S regulation: 1910.22. Maintaining a clean, organized, non-cluttered workplace, and non-hazardous will not only help with overall appearance, but will also create a safe work environment and will prevent injuries, illnesses, allergies, and even fires. This video offers information on cleaning methods for substances like dust, clutter, and mold, using the five S's method as well as other cleanup tips. Employees will gain an understanding of how to remain organized and clean, and therefore also remain safe and efficient.Topics covered also include:choosing the proper footwearproper ventilationelectrical safetypreventing combustible dustproper storage of hazardous materials 0.25 Fundamental English
The Top Five Things You Need to Know About The Flu In The Top Five Things You Need To Know About The Flu, viewers will be taken on a tour of the top five most effective ways to avoid the flu during flu season, and beyond. The reality of the flu will be discussed along with the reality of each individual's ability to prevent it. After watching this presentation, employees will have the tools necessary to take more responsibility for their own health and likely prevent the flu from affecting themselves and those around them. 0.25 Fundamental English
Bloodborne Pathogens for Custodians Maintenance and custodial workers regularly encounter situations where they could be exposed to a bloodborne pathogen. This video, produced especially for custodian and maintenance staff, demonstrates how custodians and maintenance workers can safely clean up spills of blood or other potentially infectious materials without risking exposure. Topics covered also include: What bloodborne pathogens are Diseases that could be transmitted Potential exposure routes How to protect yourself from exposure 0.25 Fundamental English
Safety Orientation for Nursing There are many potential dangers that face nurses in all types of healthcare environments. This program is designed to provide basic safety orientation information to nurses so they are aware of the various hazards they may encounter, starting from their first day on the job. Train your nurses to always "Think Safety" and to exercise good judgement and caution in their everyday work practices.Topics covered also include:Safe Lifting TechniquesElectrical SafetyFire SafetyNeedle Stick PreventionBasic Infection Control ProceduresAnd Other Important Topics. 0.25 Fundamental English
Safety Orientation for Restaurants The restaurant environment can be challenging with many potential safety hazards. This video is designed to educate associates in ways they can mitigate these hazards and work safely. The program provides overview training on a variety of topics including basic safety, machinery, slips and falls, and back injury prevention. Meets OSHA requirements for safety orientation. Topics covered also include: Cut & Burn Prevention Preventing Slips, Trips & Falls Hazard Communication Food Safety & Cross Contamination Back Injury Prevention Security 0.25 Fundamental English
Preventing Slips & Falls for Restaurants Restaurants are busy places with a lot of activity and foot traffic. Not just out front with guests and staff, but in the back of house as well. Personal safety, the safety of fellow team members and the safety of our guests is a top priority. One way to make the restaurant a safer place for everyone is by preventing slips, trips and falls. Slips, trips and falls are some of the most common incidents in the restaurant industry and it doesn_t have to be that way. Why? Because slips, trips and falls are almost always preventable. This program shows you how. 0.15 Fundamental English
Hazard Communications for Restaurants Chemicals can be found in every work environment, including restaurants. OSHA mandates that all employees be trained in the safe use, storage and handling of these materials. This video details material safety data sheets, container labeling and basic chemical safety. Information is presented in a clear, concise manner that is effective and easy to understand. 0.25 Fundamental English
WSI – Groundskeeping Safety After a frightening incident, expert workplace investigators are called to crack the case. In the midst of the story, viewers will learn about the hazards of exposure to the various machinery and elements of outdoor work environments. In this unique video, emphasis is placed on working in the elements and how to recognize, prevent and handle heat stress and a variety of other outdoor situations. This landscaping safety video is designed to prevent complacency from entering into your landscaping training. 0.25 Fundamental English
Crane Safety Crane-related accidents can often be deadly, due to the heavy loads that are lifted. Once a load or a crane itself falls, not much can be done to stop it, and there is little time for people to move safely out of the way. This training program points out to employees that over 90% of crane-related accidents are caused by human error… and that they are the key to preventing these incidents. Included on the DVD is a Leader’s Guide, End of Course Quiz, Completion Certificate, and Attendance Log. Topics covered also include: Recent changes in the OSHA crane regulations. Operator certification. Equipment inspection and hazard assessment. Boom, jib and overhead cranes. General and operational safety devices. Crane operations and hand signals. Working around power lines. 0.25 Fundamental English
Crane Safety – The New Regulation Produced specifically to train your employees on changes arising from OSHA's new crane safety standard, this program addresses and outlines the changes in a clear, concise manner that is easy for employees to understand. Training your crane operators and other employees so they are knowledgeable about what training is required under the new regulation.Topics covered also include:Important provisions in the new standardsTraining regarding overhead power lines for operators and crew membersTraining for dedicated spotters and operator certificationQualification requirements for signal personsQualifications of maintenance and repair employeesRequirements for ground condition inspectionsRequirements for crane inspections 0.5 Fundamental English
Preventing Burn Injuries – Restaurants & Food Service The food service industry employs approximately 6.5 million workers in the United States and comprises one of the largest groups of workers injured on the job each year. Food service employees experience roughly 12,000 burn injuries each year, the highest of any employment sector. These injuries and illnesses are costly and damaging, both for the employee and for the employer. This video training program is designed to train employees on the hazards of burn injuries and what steps they can take during their work shift to avoid them.Topics covered also include:Types of kitchen equipment that can cause burnsUse of Personal Protective EquipmentProper method of filling or emptying fryersHandling of hot plates and pans 0.15 Fundamental English
Back Injury Prevention for Retail Stores Back injuries are one of the most common injuries in retail stores, but they are entirely preventable. Safe lifting techniques are vital in a retail environment due to the wide range of lifting challenges. This program stresses preparation, technique and fitness as the keys to back injury prevention.Topics covered also include:The importance of stretching and warming upHow to prevent strain, stress or injurySafe lifting and material handling techniquesThe meaning of the Lever Principle 0.25 Fundamental English
Baler Safety Cardboard balers are a common sight in many retail stores. There are many different types of balers that may operate in slightly different ways. However, what they all have in common are safety hazards and the need to follow safe operating procedures. This program is designed to train employees how to operate a baler safely.Topics covered also include:Basic safety rules for baler usePre-use inspectionStandard operating proceduresSafely removing the baled cardboard 0.15 Fundamental English
Box Cutter Safety Box cutters are used in every type of retail environment. Millions of cuts are made with box cutters each day and it only takes a moment of inattention to cause an injury. Regardless of the type of box cutters used, they all can cause serious injuries if not handled properly. This video program is designed to train your employees on the dangers of box cutters as well as demonstrate the steps they can take to remain safe.Topics covered also include:Safe body positioningProper storage of the box cutterBlade disposalSafe blade changing techniques 0.1 Fundamental English
Preventing Slips, Trips, & Falls for Retail Stores Supermarkets, grocery stores and other types of retail environments are all busy places with a lot of activity and foot traffic. Not just out front on the sales floor, but in the back room as well. All this activity can easily lead to situations where both employees and customers are exposed to slip, trip, or fall hazards. Slips, trips and falls are some of the most common incidents in retail stores yet they are almost always preventable.Topics covered also include:The employee's responsibility to identify and correct slip, trip, or fall hazardsHow carelessness and inattention can lead to slip, trip, or fall injuriesProper identification of spills and the need for quick clean up action 0.15 Fundamental English
Safety Orientation for Retail Supermarkets, grocery stores and other types of retail environments present a broad range of safety training challenges. As such, it is critical that new employees receive a comprehensive safety orientation covering what these hazards are. This training program is designed to insure your employees receive proper orientation on the most common hazards, and on the many ways to minimize risk.Topics covered also include:Preventing Slips & FallsBack Injury PreventionPreventing Cuts & BurnsFood SafetyHazard CommunicationMachinery Safety 0.25 Fundamental English
Crane Signal Person Basic Training OSHA's revised crane standard includes a new training requirement for signal persons. Anyone who may signal a crane is now required to be qualified on the Standard Method for hand signals. Signal persons must know and understand the type of signals used and be tested as competent in their application of these signals. This program trains crane signal people and crane operators in the use of the 20 standardized hand signals as described in ASME B30.5 and OSHA 29 CFR 1926.Topics covered also include:A general overview of crane operations and limitationsClear demonstrations of the 20 standard crane hand signalsAn explanation of correct voice signal communicationGuidelines for using non-standard and new signalsBasic safety practices for a crane signal person 0.25 Fundamental English
Work Zone Traffic Control & Flagger Safety Work zone traffic control is an important part of any well-planned construction or maintenance project. Traffic control is essential to protect both the public from the hazards associated with the project and the employees on the work project from the traffic and the flagger is the key individual charged with the responsibility of maintaining this control. The flagger must always remember that their job is the most important one on the crew, as the lives of all individuals in the work area and the safety of those driving through the work zone depends on you and your decisions. 0.25 Fundamental English
Heavy Truck Braking System and Braking Techniques The single most important component in any vehicle is the braking system, especially on heavy trucks. The tractor portion of a tractor-semi trailer rig may have ten or more valves controlling the air flow to the brakes. This program reviews the types of braking systems found on large trucks versus cars and illustrates the importance of properly maintaining the braking system. 0.25 Fundamental English
Safe Backing of Tractor Trailer Rigs Backing a single trailer or a set of doubles with a semi tractor is the most dangerous, intricate and time-consuming set of maneuvers a big rig driver has to master. No matter how many miles you drive forward, not one of those miles will help when it comes to backing. This program trains drivers on the mechanics and techniques required in backing large vehicles such as tractor trailers, and discusses using the _cone of visibility_ to insure safe backing. 0.25 Fundamental English
Bobtailing and Jackknifing Bobtailing is sometimes necessary but a dangerous method of driving a big rig tractor without any trailing component. This program is designed to train your drivers on the challenges of bobtailing and the dangers of jackknifing. Drivers will learn how the profile, weight dynamics and engine power of the tractor can cause problems without a trailer attached. 0.25 Fundamental English
Convenience Store Safety There are many things to keep in mind when working at a convenience store, of which the safety and security of employees and customers must be at the top of the list. This training program is designed to train employees on the proper actions they must take to prevent robberies, as well as how to act during and after a robbery or robbery attempt. It also discusses other important training points for employees to be aware of such as proper housekeeping and safe lifting procedures. Regardless of experience level or age, anyone working in a retail or convenience store environment can learn valuable information that can increase their safety and security and protect company assets. 0.25 Fundamental English
Aerial Boom Lift Platform Safety Aerial boom lift platforms are powerful machines that help us in many maintenance and construction projects. If used correctly, these pieces of equipment can provide quick and easy access to work areas that were once almost impossible to reach. While there are several types of these vehicles, they all have one thing in common: they must be operated safely to prevent accidents, property damage, injuries and death. This program demonstrates safe work practices for operating aerial boom platforms.Topics covered also include:Pre-operational inspection of vehicle and work areaRequired personal protective equipmentSafe procedures for driving, raising/lowering the platform 0.25 Fundamental English
Breakthrough Safety Leadership for Hospitality Your property's safety systems are in place. They're solid. They work – if they're implemented properly. Breakthrough Safety Leadership trains your employees to focus on the behaviors that lead to a safe environment, and to not focus solely on the end result which could be Zero Accidents or some other accident reduction goal. This program takes you on a step by step, detailed journey through the entire Breakthrough Leadership process and trains employees and Management how to focus on executing existing programs properly and influencing behaviors to achieve your company's safety goals. 0.25 Fundamental English
Safe Food Handling According to the CDC, every year in the US, 48 million people are infected with a food borne illness, 128,000 are hospitalized and 3,000 people die. Nobody wants this to happen; and, with proper training in safe food handling, it doesn't have to. Foodborne illnesses can be prevented by insuring your employees are properly trained on basic food safety procedures. This program is targeted at everyone involved in the preparation, handling or service of food and outlines what these basic procedures are. It can assist employers on documenting employee training if required by their local health agency.Topics covered also include:Food-borne illnessesTime and temperature controlPersonal hygienePreventing contaminationCleaning and sanitizing equipment and utensilsPreventing cross contaminationHousekeeping and maintenance. 0.25 Fundamental English
Safe Food Handling California Version According to the CDC, every year in the US, 48 million people are infected with a food borne illness, 128,000 are hospitalized and 3,000 people die. Nobody wants this to happen; and, with proper training in safe food handling, it doesn't have to. Foodborne illnesses can be prevented by insuring your employees are properly trained on basic food safety procedures. This program is targeted at everyone involved in the preparation, handling or service of food and outlines what these basic procedures are. In most of California, employers are responsible for maintaining records documenting that each food handler employed by them possesses a valid food handler card. These records must be provided to the state or local enforcement officer upon request.Topics covered also include:Food-borne illnessesTime and temperature controlPersonal hygienePreventing contaminationCleaning and sanitizing equipment and utensilsPreventing cross contaminationHousekeeping and maintenance. 0.25 Fundamental English
Valet Safety Essentials As a valet parking professional, safety is extremely important as the hazards you could face are many. Vehicle traffic, sometimes in close quarters, other drivers not paying attention, weather, handling baggage, and parking in tight spaces are just a few of these. Equally important is customer service and courtesies extended to your guest. This program is an excellent training tool for new associates and can also be used as refresher training for experienced personnel. 0.25 Fundamental English
Globally Harmonized System for Hazard Communications – Hospitality This program, focused on the hospitality industry, fully explains the changes to OSHA's Hazard Communication Standard brought about by it's adoption of the Globally Harmonized System, or GHS. The video covers in detail the key points of the change, replacement of the MSDS with the Safety Data Sheet, the hazard classification system, new pictograms, and the updated labeling requirements. Use this program to train both your employees and supervisors on the elements of the new system. 0.25 Fundamental English
Tree Trimming Safety Tree trimming is a job that requires a professional attitude and a high level of training in order to work safely and productively. The very nature of tree trimming lends itself to many hazards. Of course, we all are aware of the potential of a serious fall, but there are also risks of coming in contact with energized utilities, falling trees and limbs, contact with poison ivy, oak, or even snakes. A good tree trimming program must be designed to provide safe working conditions, the training needed to do the job safely and efficiently, selection of qualified personnel, and providing well-maintained tools to do the job.Topics covered also include:Saws, axes, and pruning toolsChainsaw usePersonal protective equipmentSafety belts, climbing spikes, and harnessesWorking from ladders, boom trucks or aerial basketsPlanning and other considerations that need 0.25 Fundamental English
Chainsaw Safety Using a chain saw is something landscape personnel in public works and many other occupations must frequently do. Because of the dangers inherent in chain saw use, it is critical that you operators be properly trained on how to use them. This comprehensive video demonstrates chain saw use by skilled operators. In it, the most important techniques to prevent injuries when using a chain saw are covered. Every chain saw operator can learn something from this easy to understand program. 0.25 Fundamental English
Chainsaw Accidents – The Consequences Chainsaw accidents can be devastating and drastically affect your quality of life. In this program, we explain how chainsaw accidents can occur, and what the consequences can be. Filmed with visual scenes of injuries to employees who were involved in chainsaw accidents, this video hammers home the seriousness of what can happen when using a chainsaw, and the importance of following proper safety procedures at all times during chainsaw use. By demonstrating the many ways a chainsaw accident can occur your employees will walk away trained in how to prevent them. 0.15 Fundamental English
Hazard Communication in Healthcare Facilities This video introduces employees to the Hazard Communication regulations and provides training on the various groups of chemicals found in the healthcare environment. Created specifically to assist healthcare facilities of all types in complying with federal, state and municipal Hazard Communication regulations, the course addresses the major education and training requirements in these chemical hazard laws. This program comes with a Leader’s Guide, End of Course Quiz, Attendance Log, & Completion Certificate. Topics covered also include: Background of the regulation GHS Safety Data Sheets and container labels, toxins, corrosives and irritants Flammables, combustibles and gases Exposure situations Personal protective equipment Chemical storage, spills and clean-up 0.25 Fundamental English
Hazard Communication in the Hospitality Industry This video introduces employees to the Hazard Communication regulations and provides training on the various groups of chemicals found in the hospitality environment. Created specifically to assist hospitality facilities of all types in complying with federal, state and municipal Hazard Communication regulations, the course addresses the major education and training requirements in these chemical hazard laws. This program comes with a Leader’s Guide, End of Course Quiz, Attendance Log, & Completion Certificate. Topics covered also include: Background of the regulation GHS Safety Data Sheets and container labels, toxins, corrosives and irritants Flammables, combustibles and gases Exposure situations Personal protective equipment Chemical storage, spills and clean-up 0.25 Fundamental English
Active Shooter: Helping Prevent Tragedy – Hospitality Active shooter incidents have become an alarming concern for safety and security directors everywhere. Active shooter incidents are sudden, shocking and dynamic. And while the incident may be over within minutes, the impact on individuals and organizations may last for years. As these tragic cases seem increasingly common, it is essential for managers to consider the potential of such an attack at their location, and provide employees with appropriate training. 0.25 Fundamental English
General Safe Work Practices In Hospitality There are far too many specific safety concerns relating directly to the Hospitality Industry. There are programs designed to address these subjects in depth. This program is designed for new employees; to give them a general over view of their responsibilities in this fast-paced industry.Topics covered also include:Associate SafetyGuest Safetyand Security Basics 0.15 Fundamental English
Hotel Security: Handling Modern Threats This program is designed to take the viewer past the basics into some of the regulatory challenges facing Hotel Security personnel in today ís business environment. A great way to keep your security staff up to date and engaged in potential issues at your property and the issues facing the Hospitality Industry as a whole.Topics covered also include:Ever-expanding LiabilityThe Emergence of Standards and GuidelinesThe Risk Assessment ProcessA Growing Demand for Handling Dangerous ActivitiesThe Ongoing Threat of Terrorism. 0.25 Fundamental English
Hospitality Security: The Basics The program teaches them the basics of Hotel Security. It also discusses Security personnel's role in Customer Service as well as which attitudes and behaviors enhance a properties image and those they should avoid. A great program for Orientation Training for Security Staff.Topics covered also include:How to DressHow to Interact with GuestsHow to Conduct Routine Security DutiesDealing with Suspicious Individuals and others 0.25 Fundamental English
Shop Safety The shop. A lot of different things go on in here. What DOESN'T go on in here? It's a busy place with a variety of functions, tools, personnel and responsibilities. Perhaps the most important responsibility is safety….your safety and the safety of those working around you.Topics covered also include:Fire PreventionElectrical SafetyCompressed GasRespiratory HazardsSafe LiftingChemicalsSlips and Falls and Injury Reporting 0.1 Fundamental English
Good Housekeeping: Everyone's Responsibility Good housekeeping is everyone's responsibility. It doesn't matter what position you hold or what type of task you are performing; keeping your work area tidy and free of clutter should be every employee's obligation. It's part of your commitment to safety and your actions go a long way in showing your co-workers that you want everyone to go home safe at the end of each day. This program reviews basic housekeeping practices that can prevent workplace fires and discusses other hazards that could contribute to employee injuries, but can be controlled by good housekeeping.Topics covered also include:keeping a tidy work areacontrolling fire hazardsmaximizing productivitycontrolling slip and trip hazardsmaintaining personal hygienehousekeeping practices for offices and break areas 0.25 Fundamental English
Scissor Lifts in Industrial and Construction Environments Working off the ground can be challenging in both industrial and construction work environments. Often, lifting equipment such as Scissor Lifts is used to help workers get to hard to reach and previously unreachable places. However, Scissor Lifts bring their own set of hazards. This video is designed to safely work with these lifts. 0.25 Fundamental English
Security Begins At The Front Desk Hotel Security requires the participation and cooperation of everyone on Staff, not limited to Security Personnel. Front Desk personnel are a pivotal part of the Security of your property. Front Desk personnel are often the first line of defense and have perhaps the most visible role in spotting and preventing potential threats, and reporting suspicious activity. The Security of any property is at higher risk without a vigilant Front Desk Staff. This program trains your Front Desk Associates, Bell Staff or anyone working in, around or near your property’s lobby.Topics covered also include:Protecting Guest PrivacyHuman TraffickingEmergency ResponseKey Control 0.1 Fundamental English
Clean And Safe: Restrooms Clean restrooms are significant. But, this video isn’t just about HOW to clean a restroom, it’s about how to do it SAFELY. What PPE is needed? How can slips and falls be prevented in damp environments? How can you work with chemicals safely? What should be done with broken glass and/or other pointed objects? All of these questions and more are answered in this video designed for both Housekeeping and Facilities personnel. 0.1 Fundamental English
DOT General Awareness Training For Handling And Transporting Hazardous Materials Updated with the latest OSHA regulations on HAZMAT including recent changes in the Department of Transportation's labeling and placarding requirements. It is also compliant with the Globally Harmonized System. This video focuses on employees who handle as well as transport hazardous materials. It also complies with CFR 49 Section 172.704(a)(1), and incorporates the latest updates in the regulations (HM-126 and more). Included on the DVD is a Leader’s Guide, End of Course Quiz, Completion Certificate, and Attendance Log. Topics covered also include: The purpose of DOT hazardous materials regulations in 49 CFR 172.700 The definition of "hazardous materials" Required employee training Proper packaging and packaging materials Handling hazardous materials The Hazardous Materials Table and more 0.25 Fundamental English
DOT Safety Training For Handling And Transporting Hazardous Materials Increases employees awareness of the hazards associated with the materials they handle and shows them how to work safely. Updated with the latest OSHA regulations on HAZMAT including recent changes in the DOT's labeling and placarding requirements. This video also complies with GHS and the safety training regulation CFR49 Section 172.704(a)(3). It helps employees avoid accidents and teaches them about HAZMAT and the HAZMAT labeling and placards they may encounter. Included on the DVD is a Leader’s Guide, End of Course Quiz, Completion Certificate, and Attendance Log.Topics covered also include:Hazardous materials labelsShipping Papers and the Safety Data SheetPackaging, loading, shipping & receiving HAZMATsEmergency response informationThe Emergency Response GuidebookEmergency actions & first aid proceduresand more 0.25 Fundamental English
DOT Hazmat Security Awareness This program focuses on employees who handle hazardous materials. Updated with the latest OSHA regulations on GHS & HAZMAT including recent changes in the DOT's labeling and placarding requirements. It teaches them to be aware of security risks they may face when transporting hazardous materials. It covers everything employees must know to recognize and address the security risks associated with handling and transporting hazardous materials, and complies with CFR49 Section 172.704(a)(4). Included on the DVD is a Leader’s Guide, End of Course Quiz, Completion Certificate, and Attendance Log.Topics covered also include:The need for HAZMAT security trainingInternal vulnerabilitiesSecuring HAZMATs and the facilityPreparing to ship hazardous materialsProtecting HAZMAT shipmentsand more 0.25 Fundamental English
DOT In Depth Hazmat Security Training This program covers security objectives, various types of security procedures, employees' responsibilities and actions to take in the event of a security breech, as well as risks of transporting hazardous materials and more. Updated with the latest OSHA regulations on GHS & HAZMAT including recent changes in the DOT's labeling and placarding requirements. It also complies with CFR49's Section 172.704(a)(5). It also includes the HazMat transportation manual. Included on the DVD is a Leader’s Guide, End of Course Quiz, Completion Certificate, and Attendance Log.Topics covered also include:The need for HAZMAT security trainingThe Security Plan & tips to avoid hijackingInternal vulnerabilities & facility securityPreparing to ship hazardous materials & shipping HAZMATsUnloading hazardous material shipmentsActions to take in the event of a security breachand more 0.25 Fundamental English
Workplace Violence: Facts & Prevention for Hospitality The potential for workplace violence has become a stark reality in our world today. While the odds of a serious incident happening on your property may be slim, the importance for effective preparedness remains vital. This program helps you achieve a level a preparedness and allows viewers to develop a sense of confidence if faced with a potentially violent situation in the workplace. How to recognize signs of potential problems and what to do if this potential becomes reality are both discussed in depth. 0.25 Fundamental English
Emergency Preparedness & Response While they may be rare, fires, severe weather, chemical spills or exposures, severe injuries, medical emergencies, workplace violence and other emergency situations often occur without warning. Employees have the responsibility to be prepared and know how to respond should such an emergency occur at their workplace. Knowing the proper procedures to follow during an emergency could mean the difference between life and death. The purpose of this program is to familiarize viewers with basic emergency response practices that will help them be prepared for and respond to a crisis or an emergency. 0.5 Fundamental English
Manager on Duty for Hospitality Manager on Duty. What exactly does that mean? It might be easier to define what it DOESN’T mean because the responsibilities of a Manager on Duty involve every aspect of the entire operation including outside, inside, front of house, back of house, Associates, Guests, everything. This video focuses on some of the more vital issues relating to Safety and Security. A Manager on Duty may not be actually perform the duties or responsibilities in each issue we discuss, but they are responsible to ensure they are done, or not done, to protect the safety of our guests, property and our Associates.Topics covered also include:guest privacy and noise complaintsevictions and aggressive behaviorDRAM shopemployee/guest injuriesdrugs/weaponsand much more 0.25 Fundamental English
Injury Prevention in Restaurants and Food Service Restaurants are busy places with a wide variety of potential hazards. This video examines some of the more common hazards in Food Service and discusses choices workers can make to protect themselves and co-workers.Topics covered also include:strains, sprains, bruises and fracturescuts, lacerations and puncturesburns and scaldssafety tips for kitchen staff, servers, bus people, bar staff and dishwashers 0.25 Fundamental English
Bloodborne Pathogens for the Hospitality Industry Hospitality industry employees can easily be exposed to Bloodborne pathogens, regardless of whether they are in housekeeping, food service, or maintenance. This program trains your employees on the dangers of Bloodborne Pathogens and how to control exposure that will prevent diseases and save lives. This program provides a comprehensive overview about the important topic of Bloodborne Pathogens and explains OSHA's required training points to your employees. This DVD contains both English and Spanish versions.Topics covered also include:DiseasesExposure Control PlanOccupationsRoutes of EntryProper DisposalAction after exposure 0.15 Fundamental English
Hazardous Material Labels One important method for identifying hazardous materials is through the use of container labels. From bottles and drums to trucks and railcars, labels and placards provide information about the contents of a container, as well as what to do and who to call in case of an emergency. Because this information is so critical for the safe handling and transporting of these potentially dangerous substances, several organizations have developed labeling and placarding systems to communicate to employees about a container's contents. This program, Hazardous Materials Labels, is designed to train your employees so they understand the characteristics of different labeling systems and the ways that each convey information. By recognizing the differences and similarities of these systems, employees will be better prepared to work safely around hazardous materials.Topics covered also include:Types of containers requiring labels and the information required on the label.Types of containers requiring labels and the information required on the label.Department of Transportation (DOT) hazardous material classifications.DOT label and placard requirements.The National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA) labeling system.The Hazardous Materials Identification System (HMIS).Hazardous waste labeling. 0.5 Fundamental English
Cold Stress – Working Safely in Cold Weather Anyone who works outside on a regular basis knows – at some point or another – you’re going to experience cold and wet weather conditions. These working conditions can threaten your ability to do your job safely, as cold can have negative effects on the body. This is known as cold stress. Cold and wet weather can begin to have negative effects on the body in temperatures as high as 59 degrees Fahrenheit. This safety video trains employees to understand and recognize why it’s important to keep an eye out for the effects of cold stress.Topics covered also include:Hypothermia PreventionHypothermia SymptomsFrostbiteFrostbite SymptomsFrostbite TreatmentTrench FootTrench Foot Treatment 0.15 Fundamental English
Backhoe & Front End Loader Safety Backhoes are one of the most common types of construction equipment found on jobsites. Backhoe loaders can dig, scrape and load material. With special attachments they can perform virtually any required task. Backhoe loaders are complicated machines and it is important your employees know and understand the equipment’s capabilities. This program covers the maintenance and operation of a backhoe with emphasis on safety. This program contains both an English & Spanish version on the DVD and also comes with a Leader’s Guide, PowerPoint presentation, end of course quiz, attendance log, and completion certificate. 0.25 Fundamental English
Emergency First Aid First Aid is the immediate care given to the injured or suddenly ill person. It is temporary assistance that is rendered until competent medical care, if required, arrives and takes over. This training program is designed to provide basic information for your employees on how to properly apply first aid in emergency situations. This program contains both an English & Spanish version on the DVD and also comes with a Leader’s Guide, PowerPoint presentation, end of course quiz, attendance log, and completion certificate. Emergency situations covered include: Severe bleeding When a person is not breathing Broken bones When a person has no heartbeat 0.25 Fundamental English
Janitorial Safety Janitorial workers have many varied responsibilities. It would be easier to talk about what tasks they DON’T perform, than what they actually do on a daily basis. Regardless of how many different tasks they perform or how busy they are, the simple truth is that their safety should be a company’s top priority. This program trains your employees on how to identify the common hazards that janitorial staff face on a daily basis and the steps they can take to minimize risk. It also includes both English and Spanish versions on one DVD.Topics covered also include:Personal Protective EquipmentBack Injury Prevention,Bloodborne PathogensSlips, Trips and FallsElectrical SafetyChemicals 0.25 Fundamental English
Commercial Kitchen Fire Prevention Fires are an ever-present danger in a commercial kitchen. But the danger can be controlled and contained by following sound fire prevention principles. This video outlines these principles and trains your employees that properly following them will help in preventing and containing fires in your establishment. This program covers the different types of fire suppression systems as well as how to operate and inspect them. Additionally, the importance of keeping flues and appliances grease-free is reviewed as well as other common sense tips that will help your employees remain safe. It comes with both English and Spanish on one DVD. Topics covered also include: Different types of fire suppression systems How to operate and inspect these systems The importance of keeping flues and appliances grease-free Common sense tips to help employees remain safe 0.1 Fundamental English
Property Management Safety – Employee Slips and Falls Property management company employees work in many types of varied environments. Inside, outside, rain, snow, and wet floors are just a few of the many slip hazards they face. This training program is designed to promote awareness of slips and falls from a property management perspective. It trains your employees on various potential hazards, the importance of proper maintenance and cleaning procedures, and many other aspects of slip and fall prevention. This DVD contains both English and Spanish versions. 0.15 Fundamental English
Property Management Safety – Fire Prevention Few things can be more terrifying and catastrophic than a fire, especially in a multi-unit property environment. That is why training and education is so important. This video program trains your employees on ways fires can be prevented, conditions that contribute to fires and the steps employees can take to minimize the risk of a potential fire in a unit. This DVD contains both English and Spanish versions. 0.1 Fundamental English
Property Management Safety – Personal Protective Equipment During their workday, property management maintenance personnel can face many different types of safety situations. As such, it is important that they be properly trained on what Personal Protective Equipment is required and how to use it. Personal Protective Equipment is often overlooked. Failure to utilize the correct PPE can have disastrous, life-changing results. This video emphasizes to your employees the importance of making sure they have and use the proper PPE in a multi-unit complex environment. This DVD contains both English and Spanish versions. 0.1 Fundamental English
Property Management Safety – Resident Safety In every property management environment, nothing is more important than the safety of your residents. There a many hazards that can exist when you have a large number of people living close to each other. Fire prevention, cleanliness and maintenance are just a few of the subjects covered in this production training program. This video highlights trains your employees on the key issues relating to safety in regards to new residents. This DVD contains both English and Spanish versions. 0.1 Fundamental English
Property Management Safety – Resident Slips and Falls When a resident in a multi-unit property injures themselves through a slip or fall, the potential liability exposure to management is great. All property management employees must be aware of this and what their responsibilities are to keep slip and fall hazards to a minimum. With a focus on exterior and weather related hazards, this training program is designed to train your employees on what types of hazards to look for and how they should be corrected. This DVD contains both English and Spanish versions. 0.1 Fundamental English
Emergency Planning According to existing OSHA, SARA Title III, and numerous state regulations every facility is required to have an Emergency Plan that spells out what is to be done in case of an emergency. The plan, as well as other important information, should be shared with the local Emergency Planning Committee and emergency response groups such as the police, fire department and others. This training program covers the basics of Emergency Planning and assists facilities in complying with regulations to help them prepare for potential emergency situations. Included on the DVD is a Leader’s Guide, End of Course Quiz, Completion Certificate, and Attendance Log. Topics covered also include: The emergency planning process The threat of terrorism Your role in emergency planning Emergency action drills… the process Emergency action drills… playing your part And more 0.25 Fundamental English
Evacuation Procedures Imagine a crisis striking your workplace. Would your employees be ready to clear the building safely? Dealing with an emergency is never easy. Neither is evacuating a facility when one is happening. Very few people can think clearly or act logically in a crisis, often leading to a panic. The result can be a stampede that causes injuries and property damage. This program trains your employees how to evacuate in a calm and orderly fashion. It provides the information employees need to learn to act quickly and safely during a crisis. Included on the DVD is a Leader’s Guide, End of Course Quiz, Completion Certificate, and Attendance Log. Topics covered also include: The Evacuation Team Preparing yourself for an evacuation Basic evacuation procedures Evacuating multi-story buildings Coping with fires and explosions Dealing with HAZMAT emergencies And more 0.25 Fundamental English
Carbon Monoxide: The Facts – Hospitality Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas generally formed in the process of incomplete combustion of organic substances such as fuels. It is dangerous because it interferes with normal oxygen intake for humans and is a potential hazard within the hospitality industry. This program outlines a number of recommendations that can help reduce the threat of carbon monoxide on your property. It comes with both English and Spanish versions on the same DVD. Topics covered also include: What is carbon monoxide and why it is dangerous How carbon monoxide is generated Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning Proper maintenance of fuel-fired equipment to minimize carbon monoxide accumulation 0.25 Fundamental English
HIPAA The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, or HIPAA, forbids sharing, transmitting or divulging of information designated as Protected Health Information or PHI of individuals. It’s designed to offer workers specific protections. Businesses are charged with the responsibility of complying with the provisions set forth in HIPAA and this program was designed to help you reach this goal. This program will help you understand what the HIPAA rulings mean, what your company must do and the steps that must be taken to bring your organization into compliance.Topics covered also include:Business Associate AgreementsNotice of Privacy PracticesDefinition of Protected Health Information 0.25 Fundamental English
Bloodborne Pathogens in Healthcare Facilities Bloodborne diseases continue to pose major health problems in healthcare facilities. Increasing infection rates for Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C are now making them as serious a concern as HIV, the virus which can often lead to AIDS. So it’s more important than ever for employees to understand the hazards of bloodborne pathogens, the policies and practices that can prevent their transmission, and the OSHA regulations that address them. This training program provides essential information while assisting healthcare organizations in fulfilling the training requirements contained in the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard (29 CFR 1910.1030).Topics covered also include:HIV, Hepatitis and sources of infectionThe Exposure Control PlanBiohazard labelingReducing the risk of exposurePersonal protective equipmentHepatitis vaccinationPost-exposure procedures and more! 0.5 Fundamental English
Bloodborne Pathogens in First Response Environments Bloodborne diseases continue to pose major health problems in first response environments. Increasing infection rates for Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C are now making them as serious a concern as HIV, the virus which can often lead to AIDS. So it’s more important than ever for employees to understand the hazards of bloodborne pathogens, the policies and practices that can prevent their transmission, and the OSHA regulations that address them. This training program provides essential information while assisting first responders in fulfilling the training requirements contained in the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard (29 CFR 1910.1030).Topics covered also include:HIV, Hepatitis and sources of infectionThe Exposure Control PlanBiohazard labelingReducing the risk of exposurePersonal protective equipmentHepatitis vaccinationPost-exposure procedures and more! 0.5 Fundamental English
Bed Bugs: Facts And Prevention Bed bugs have made a comeback in the US due to increased international travel. Bed bugs can crawl out of a traveler’s suitcases and establish themselves in hotel rooms. A Bed bug problem can be quite expensive. In fact, an outbreak could lead to serious litigation and large settlements and loss of business. Can your property afford it? This program trains your employees to spot bed bugs so they can be caught in the early stages and remediated before a major infestation occurs. This DVD contains both English and Spanish versions. 0.15 Fundamental English
Tuberculosis in the Healthcare Environment Tuberculosis (TB) kills more than a million people every year. In the United States, more than 11 million people already carry tuberculosis in a "latent", noninfectious form. And thousands of these people will eventually develop the "active" form of the disease as well, which can be fatal. This education and training program discusses the risk of TB in the healthcare environment today, and discusses how employees can help prevent transmission of the disease in their workplace. Topics covered also include: The resurgence of tuberculosis How TB spreads and guidelines for fighting it TB risks in healthcare environments Medical surveillance Engineering controls Wearing a respirator Working with and treating active TB 0.5 Fundamental English
HIPAA Rules and Compliance To get quality healthcare, people should not have to sacrifice the privacy or security of their personal health information. The set of regulations known as HIPAA ensures that private patient data remains private. But the laws can seem complex and the penalties for non-compliance can be costly. This training program defines HIPAA terms, explains the laws, and discusses what business entities and employees in healthcare-related fields need to do to comply with them.Topics covered also include:HIPAA and protected health information (PHI)Covered entities, business associates and subcontractorsPHI and patients' rightsGuidelines for use and disclosure of PHIUsing PHI for marketing and fundraisingRequirements of the HIPAA Security RuleBreach notification and penalties …and more 0.25 Fundamental English
Trenching and Shoring Safety in Construction Environments Construction work can expose employees to some pretty serious hazards. Compared to other areas on a construction site, working in an excavation more than doubles an employee's chances of being killed on the job. And some of the greatest excavation hazards can be encountered when they work in a trench. This training program provides employees with the information they need to work safely in and around a trench (OSHA Standard 29 CFR 1926). 0.25 Fundamental English
Dealing with Drug & Alcohol Abuse for Employees in Construction Environments In the United States there are over 50 million binge drinkers, 17 million illegal drug users and almost 15 million people who abuse prescription drugs. Substance abuse directly affects a construction worker's health, personality, and ability to function safely on a worksite. It can also decrease productivity, create a hostile work environment, and damage your company's reputation. This training video discusses the hazards of substance abuse, how employees can avoid them and what they can do to help keep their job site drug and alcohol free. 0.25 Fundamental English
HAZWOPER 8 Hour Refresher A hazardous materials incident is defined as the release, or suspected release, of a hazardous material into the environment. Even with the best prevention methods in place, hazardous materials incidents are bound to happen. Understanding the nature of the hazardous materials you work with, and how to respond to an incident or potential incident will help you quickly manage a dangerous situation and minimize damage done to persons, the environment, and facilities.
 
This HAZWOPER Refresher course serves as continuing education training for workers who have taken the prerequisite 24 or 40 hour HAZWOPER course and meets the requirements of OSHA CFR 1910.120 for 8 hours of annual refresher training. 
 
After completing this course, you will have immediate access to a personalized certificate of completion that can be printed from your computer. 
After successfully completing the first lesson, you will be able to:
• list the different environmental regulations surrounding the issue of hazardous waste
• describe what is considered to be a hazardous “event” and explain how it differs from other types of emergency events
• recall the definition of a hazardous waste and identify the different types of hazardous wastes
• describe the characteristics of toxicity, reactivity, ignitability, and corrosivity
• name different examples of hazardous wastes generated by various industries
After successfully completing the second lesson, you will be able to:
• describe the different forms of hazard communication
• identify the different parts of a label required by OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard, the DOT, NFPA 704, HMIS, and other systems of labeling hazardous chemicals
• recall the format of a Safety Data Sheet (SDS) and what information it requires
• explain the purpose of the North American Emergency Response Guidebook
After successfully completing the third lesson, you will be able to:
• define toxicology and describe the different kinds of toxins
• recall the different types of toxic exposure routes of entry and effects
• choose what kind of PPE is appropriate for a given situation
• perform proper fit testing and understand the limitations of PPE
• describe how exposure limits are determined
After successfully completing the fourth lesson, you will be able to:
• recall the definition of a hazardous materials release
• take steps to prevent hazardous materials incidents from occurring
• describe the different emergency responder roles, in particular the role of the first responder at the awareness level
• explain the incident command system and the different members that comprise it
• list the different types of decontamination
8 Fundamental English
Smart Workplaces: Designing Safe Workspaces & Preventing Injury Common workplace health and safety issues can take a toll on staff and the company budget, but it doesn’t have to be that way. Many of the problems workers encounter on the job are preventable if steps are taken to avoid injuries before they happen. This online course explores methods used to design safe workspaces and examines work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs), which are a leading cause of injury in the workplace. You’ll also learn specific ergonomically correct techniques for heavy lifting, setting up a computer station and more. At the conclusion of this course, you will be able to:
• Explain the risk factors for MSDs and the process for addressing ergonomics issues in your workplace
• Identify problem areas and minimize hazards to prevent MSDs
• List specific ergonomic guidelines
• Explain the best way to set up a computer workstation to help prevent the development of MSDs
1 Fundamental English
Smart Workplaces: Preparing for a Pandemic Flu Outbreak What if a third of our employees could not come to work because they were sick – or were caring for sick family members? What if the companies that we rely on to do business – suppliers, staffing companies, even banking – could not take care of our business due to flu absences in their own companies?

An outbreak of influenza can cripple a business’s productivity if a large percentage of its employees are infected all at once. As the threat of a pandemic flu increases, business managers and HR professionals should take steps now to create and implement a pandemic influenza response plan. If done properly, an influenza response plan can help businesses reduce the risk of a large percentage of absenteeism and maintain crucial operations, as influenza is more widely transmitted.
 
This course will explain the latest CDC and Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines, as well as provide checklists and sample communications to help business and HR professionals assemble a pandemic influenza response plan. The training provided in this course will help employers to determine how to avoid adverse effects on other entities in their supply chains while also reducing transmission among staff. 

At the conclusion of this course, you will be able to:
• Explain how a flu outbreak may affect your business
• Describe the components of an Influenza Plan for your business
• List the action steps you can take to prevent the spread of flu in your business
1 Intermediate English
Smart Safety: Safe Driving Driving is a dangerous activity most of us participate in every day. Even if you are doing everything correctly you have to watch out for others. People are routinely distracted by eating, texting, cell phones, emotions and just about everything else under the sun. This is coupled with dangerous roadways, construction zones, pedestrians, adverse weather conditions, equipment failure and congestion. It's no wonder that a commute to work or a simple work trip can feel like running a dangerous gauntlet. The aim of this course is to reduce the risk of driving by anticipating dangerous situations, despite adverse conditions or the mistakes of others. This can be achieved through adherence to a variety of general rules, as well as the practice of specific driving techniques.  In this lesson the student will be introduced to the basic concepts of safe driving including definitions and statistics, perception and ability, legal driving vs. safe driving; and causes of unsafe driving. At the conclusion of this course, you should be able to:
• Examine the basic concepts of safe driving.
• Describe what should be done to avoid distraction while driving.
• Explain the dangers of being under the influence of alcohol and drugs while driving.
• Recognize the repercussions of speeding and tailgating.
• Describe risks and warning signs of drowsy driving and what to do for drowsiness.
• Examine the causes of aggressive behavior and how it should be avoided.
• Identify vehicle safety equipment and how they should be used.
1 Intermediate English
Smart Health: Bloodborne Pathogens The OSHA BBP Standard is a published set of regulations designed to protect you against the health hazards of exposure to bloodborne pathogens — exposures that may cause diseases that may be transmitted by blood or other body fluids.  The OSHA BBP Standard requires that controls and compliance methods be put in place by employers and followed by employees in order to eliminate or minimize the scope of the exposure.  In this interactive course, you will learn about the OSHA BBP Standard in terms of specific pathogens, including Hepatitis B virus, Hepatitis C virus, and HIV.  You will also learn about what to do if you are exposed to bloodborne pathogens in the workplace. At the conclusion of this course you will be able to:

• Explain the engineering controls, work practice controls, and personal protective equipment used to reduce exposure to blood and other potentially infectious material
• Describe the OSHA BBP Standard, the characteristics of BBPs, including HBV, HIV, and HCV and how the immune system responds
• Describe the benefits of the Hepatitis B vaccine, the OSHA requirements regarding the exposure incident, evaluation, and follow-up and the OSHA requirements regarding specific workplace practices.

1 Intermediate English
Coronavirus 101 – What You Need to Know Protecting your health against the Coronavirus (COVID-19) starts with getting the right information. This interactive online microcourse features critical information about how COVID-19 spreads, how to recognize its symptoms, how to prevent and treat the virus, and what to do if you become sick with the virus. 0.25 Fundamental English
Coronavirus 102 – Preparing your Household A COVID-19 outbreak could last for a long time in your community. Creating a household plan can help protect your health and the health of those you care about in the event of an outbreak in your community. This interactive online course will provide you with practical guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to help you get your household ready for community transmission of the disease in the United States. 0.25 Fundamental English
Coronavirus 103 – Managing Stress and Anxiety Crises such as the COVID-19 outbreak can certainly induce an incredible amount of worry and stress on anyone. Stress is our body's way of responding to physical, emotional, or mental demands, such as those imposed by COVID-19 pandemic. This interactive online course discusses signs and symptoms of stress and explains the physical and emotional effects of built up stress, such as anxiety. This course also discusses stress management techniques, treatment options, and lifestyle changes to help alleviate. 0.25 Fundamental English
Coronavirus 104 – Transitioning to a Remote Workforce Advancements in technology and 24/7 internet access have dramatically changed strategies for workforce management, providing flexible, remote working opportunities for some workplaces in times of crisis like the COVID-19 outbreak. This interactive online course describes the factors that contribute to the need for a remote workforce, discusses the advantages and challenges of transitioning to a remote workforce environment, and lists best practices for successful remote workforce management. 0.25 Fundamental English
Coronavirus 105 – Cleaning and Disinfecting your Workplace Cleaning of visibly dirty surfaces followed by disinfection is a best practice measure for prevention of COVID-19 and other viral respiratory illnesses in community settings. This interactive online course will provide you with practical guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for cleaning and disinfecting rooms or areas where those with confirmed COVID-19 have visited. 0.25 Fundamental English
Coronavirus 106 – DIY Cloth Face Coverings The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released new guidelines for the use of cloth face coverings to help slow the spread of coronavirus, also known as COVID-19. This interactive online course covers best practices for wearing cloth face coverings and includes tutorials for sew and no sew methods for creating face coverings as recommended by the CDC. 0.25 Fundamental English
Coronavirus 107 – Reopening your Organization Are you considering reopening your business? The CDC has released guidance to help organizations make reopening decisions during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially to protect vulnerable workers. It is important to check with state and local health officials to determine the most appropriate actions that are unique to your community. This interactive online course will provide you with practical guidance from the CDC to help get your organization ready to reopen. 0.25 Fundamental English
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